posted September 28, 1999

Dutch Missions in America

A lecture concerning early Dutch mission work with Native Americans will be presented at Hope College by Dr. Paul Otto of the Dordt College faculty on Friday, Oct. 8, at 3:45 p.m. in Winants Auditorium of Graves Hall.

          The public is invited.  Admission is free.
          Otto will present "Wilden en Calvinisten (Savages
  and Calvinists):  Dutch Missions to Native Americans in
  Colonial New York."  He will explore Dutch attitudes toward
  Native Americans in early American history, including how
  much the idea that Native Americans were incapable of
  becoming "civilized" affected efforts to evangelize them.
          Otto is an assistant professor of history at Dordt
  College, which is located in Sioux Center, Iowa.  He is the
  author of "New Netherland Frontier:  Europeans and Native
  Americans along the Lower Hudson River, 1524-1664," and
  maintains an on-going research interest on Dutch-Native
  American relations while also studying the representation of
  Native Americans in film.
          He originally wrote "New Netherland Frontier" as
  his dissertation, receiving his doctorate in 1995 from
  Indiana University in Bloomington.  In 1998, a revised
  version received the Hendricks Prize for the best manuscript
  on the Dutch experience in colonial America.  He is
  currently revising the manuscript for publication.
          Otto has written a variety of articles, reviews
  and essays, and has presented papers or chaired sessions at
  the meetings of organizations including the Popular Culture
  Association, the Association for Netherlandic Studies and
  the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and
  Culture.  At the invitation of the New Netherland Project,
  he presented the paper "Common Practices and Mutual
  Misunderstandings:  Henry Hudson, Native Americans, and the
  Birth of New Netherland" at the 22nd annual Rensselaerswijck
  Seminar in Albany, N.Y., on Saturday, Sept. 18.
          Otto's lecture at Hope is part of the college's
  "History Colloquium Series," which the department of history
  presents each year in conjunction with Phi Alpha Theta, the
  history honorary society.  Otto's lecture is co-sponsored
  with the A.C. Van Raalte Institute at Hope.
          Lubbers Hall is located along 10th Street between
  College and Columbia avenues.