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Hope College
Department of English
126 E. 10th St.
Holland, MI 49423

english@hope.edu
phone: 616.395.7620
fax: 616.395.7134

 

Spring 2014 Upper-Level English Courses

Notice: English 271 (British Literature II), English 281 (American Literature II), and English 282 (American Ethnic Literature) are now taught in rotations, two semesters on, one semester off.

  • 271 will be offered Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, and Spring 2015.
  • 281 will be offered Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, and Spring 2015.
  • 282 will be offered Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, and Fall 2014.

If you have any questions, please contact Sarah Baar (baar@hope.edu).

213.01 Expository Writing II James TR 2:00 - 2:50 PM
214.01A Workplace Writing Werner MW 2:00 - 3:20 PM
214.01B Workplace Writing Werner TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM
231.01 Literature of the Western World I James TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM
234.01 Modern Global Literature Cole TR 1:30 - 2:50 PM
248.01 Introduction to Literary Studies Cole MW 9:00 - 10:20 AM
248.02 Introduction to Literary Studies Cole MW 2:00 - 3:20 PM
248.03 Introduction to Literary Studies Kipp TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM
254.01 Creative Writing: Fiction Kenagy MW 1:00 - 2:50 PM
255.01 Creative Writing: Poems Kenagy TR 1:00 - 2:50 PM
258.01 Creative Writing: Nonfiction Trembley MW 3:00 - 4:50 PM
270.01 British Literature I Schakel MWRF 11:00 - 11:50 AM
271.01 British Literature II Hemenway MWF 12:00 - 12:50 PM
279.01 Writing for Teachers Trembley MW 1:00 - 2:50 PM
280.01 American Literature I Verduin MWF 1:00 - 1:50 PM
281.01 American Literature II Verduin MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM
295.01 African American Lit Parker TR 9:30 - 10:50 AM
295.02 Gender and Sexuality in Chinese Literature and Society Shih TR 3:30 - 4:50 PM
354.01 Inter. Creative Writing: Novel Trembley M 5:30 - 8:20 PM
355.01 Inter. Creative Writing: Poems Childress TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM
360.01 Modern English Grammar Verduin MWF 11:00 - 11:50 AM
371.01 Old and Middle English Gruenler MWF 9:30 - 10:20 AM
373.01 Novels of Crime and Punishment Hemenway MWF 2:00 - 2:50 PM
373.02 Shakespeare's Plays Cox MW 3:00 - 4:20 PM
373.03 Lit for Children and Adolescents Portfleet TR 12:00 - 1:20 PM
380.01 Teaching Secondary School Engl Moreau M 4:00 - 5:50 PM
454.01 Adv. Creative Writing: Fiction Childress TR 3:00 - 4:20 PM
455.01 Adv. Creative Writing: Poems Peschiera M 5:30 - 8:20 pm

Course Descriptions

ENGL 213 01: Expository Writing II
James, David
TR 2:00 PM 2:50 PM

In this workshop-oriented course, students will make their own choices of both topics and expository genres. In the process, everyone will focus on clarity and style to suit chosen audiences and purposes. Revising with feedback will then lead to a semester’s end portfolio. Full semester.

ENGL 214 01A: Workplace Writing
Werner, Courtney
MW 2:00 PM 3:20 PM

Workplace writing is a writing workshop course that focused on specific workplace and professional genres and writing styles and patterns. The focus of every writing workshop is helping students become more effective writers. In this course, students focus on becoming better professional writers by spending time theorizing about and practicing skills suited to workplace writing, including practice with appropriate formats, styles, and genres.

In some ways, this course focuses on rhetoric—both oral and written—because rhetoric is the foundation of strong communication skills. The course is taught as a participation-heavy, collaborative workshop. Students work with each other in groups daily, and they work collaboratively on certain projects. Multimodal and technology-related projects are also incorporated into various areas of the course.

ENGL 214 01B: Workplace Writing
Werner, Courtney
TR 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

Workplace writing is a writing workshop course that focused on specific workplace and professional genres and writing styles and patterns. The focus of every writing workshop is helping students become more effective writers. In this course, students focus on becoming better professional writers by spending time theorizing about and practicing skills suited to workplace writing, including practice with appropriate formats, styles, and genres.

In some ways, this course focuses on rhetoric—both oral and written—because rhetoric is the foundation of strong communication skills. The course is taught as a participation-heavy, collaborative workshop. Students work with each other in groups daily, and they work collaboratively on certain projects. Multimodal and technology-related projects are also incorporated into various areas of the course.

ENGL 231 01: Literature Western World I
James, David
TR 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

The objectives of this version of World Lit I are: to read, with care, several of the many important texts of the ancient, medieval, and renaissance western world; to discover and appreciate aspects of the developing literary art; and to understand how such texts reflect the ideas and values of their eras and likewise have contributed to our own. The course method will encourage connecting personally with the readings and contributing personal observations during class, which in turn will blend with informal lecture and some video viewing. Students, therefore, should expect to prepare fully for, and participate frequently during, class—at which attendance will be required. As one would expect, students do a fair amount of reading, often of rather difficult material, as well as a fair amount of explorational and formal writing.

This course fulfills the Cultural Heritage I requirement. 4 credit hours.

ENGL 234 01: Modern Global Literature
Cole, Ernest
TR 1:30 PM 2:50 PM

The contact between western societies and the so–called “Third World” has led to the creation of a number of discourses that have shaped and continue to shape the literary cannons of both societies and the relationship between scholars and writers of the two distinct traditions. This initial contact has led to, for instance, the discourse of imperialism and its representation of indigenous peoples and societies as “other” or “different.” The socio-cultural and political assumptions that go with these labels have shaped western consciousness of other peoples as well as contributed to the emergence of a body of work and criticism that seek to deconstruct western hegemony, control and domination by writing back to former colonialists and their literature.

This course would focus on how former colonized societies from Sub-Saharan Africa to South Asia, the Caribbean and South America react to this discourse of “otherness” and their attempts at de-colonization and promoting their political and cultural independence. In the process, this form of literature would “write back to empire” by addressing issues as destruction of indigenous cultures, representation of otherness, identity, alterity, and gender.

Thus, in this course, we would examine works that cover a considerable period of growth and development in time and place in global literatures from Africa to the Caribbean and Latin America. Within this historical and cultural framework, we would trace the impact of westernization on it the literature, and its reconfiguration of colonial perceptions of indigenous societies in the process of writing back to empire.This course fulfills the Cultural Heritage II requirement. 4 credit hours.

ENGL 248 01: Intro to Literary Studies
Cole, Ernest
MW 9:00 AM 10:20 AM

Please contact faculty member for more information.

ENGL 248 02: Intro to Literary Studies
Cole, Ernest
MW 2:00 PM 3:20 PM

Please contact faculty member for more information.

ENGL 248 03: Intro to Literary Studies
Kipp, Julie
TR 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

This course is an introduction to the literary forms of fiction, poetry, drama, and creative nonfiction, considering elements they have in common and elements unique to each. It will examine how genres differ, but also how they intersect and overlap and influence each other. It aims to teach how to read literature with sensitivity, understanding, and appreciation, and how to approach that reading from a variety of theoretical perspectives. It is not a course in writing stories or poems or drama--for that, see English 254 or 255 or 258. It is a foundational course, intended as preparation for all higher-numbered literature courses in the English department. But it also is of value in itself and is recommended for students looking for an elective dealing with literature broadly. Four credit hours.

ENGL 254 01: Creative Writing: Fiction
Kenagy, Robert
MW 1:00 PM 2:50 PM

This class will explore, experiment, and expand our understanding of fiction. Through a variety of writing exercises, you’ll practice the methods and conventions of the short story while trying new techniques. Drafting, expansion, revision, and dedication lie at the heart of the class. We’ll work to make our writing vivid, continuous, and alive for the readers and ourselves. Expect to read plenty of rich, compelling, and engaging writers – both current and canonized. You’ll also thoughtfully read and comment on your peer’s writing. A strong work ethic, an honest and open curiosity, keen observations, a love of reading, and a willingness to participate in class are essential to your success. As far as nuts and bolts go, you’re required to write and read for every class, produce a number of short stories in various drafts, and attend the Jack Ridl Visiting Writer’s Series events. Ultimately, this class is fun – serious fun – that will equip you to better approach writing and the world around you.

ENGL 255 01: Creative Writing: Poems
Kenagy, Robert
TR 1:00 PM 2:50 PM

This class will explore, experiment, and expand our understanding of poetry. Through a variety of writing exercises, you’ll practice the methods, conventions, and forms of poetry while finding your voice. Drafting, expansion, revision, and dedication lie at the heart of the class. We’ll work to make our language play, inspire, transform, and dance. Expect to read plenty of rich, compelling, and engaging writers – both current and canonized. You’ll also thoughtfully read and comment on your peer’s poems. A strong work ethic, an honest and open curiosity, keen observations, a love of reading, and a willingness to participate in class are essential to your success. As far as nuts and bolts go, you’re required to write and read for every class, produce a number of short stories in various drafts, and attend the Jack Ridl Visiting Writer’s Series events. Ultimately, this class is fun – serious fun – that will equip you to better approach writing poetry and the world around you.

ENGL 258 01: Creative Writing: Nonfiction
Trembley, Elizabeth
MW 3:00 PM 4:50 PM

RISK WRITING
Ask Your Questions. Discover Your Answers.

First off: personal essays = public thinking = today’s great blogging.

I mention this not because you have to want to blog to get lots out of this class, but if writing personal essays sounds boring and useless, thing again. Most great blogs are personal essays. Do you read great blogs? Do you want to learn to do that? Take this course.

No interest in blogging? That’s okay. If you are interested in a course where you can ask the questions most important to you, write and think your way through an exploration of your question, and then polish up your writing so others can read it and learn from it, then take this course!

We’ll write, workshop and read. All kinds of writers, all kinds of topics. Questions, conundrums, adventures, voyages, laughs, aha!s, wonders, risks. Writing level: high. Reading level: high/moderate.

If you have curiosity and if writing helps you figure things out, you’ll love this course.

ENGL 270 01: British Literature I
Schakel, Peter
MWRF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM

Brit Lit I surveys literature written in England until the late eighteenth century. Its purpose is to give students a general knowledge and understanding of the great writers and works of early England (Beowulf and other Old English texts), medieval England (Chaucer, Langland, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight), Renaissance England (Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and Shakespeare), writers of the early seventeenth century (Donne, Jonson, Herrick, Herbert) and the later seventeenth century (Marvell, Milton, Bunyan, Dryden), and writers of eighteenth century England (Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Austen). These are the “classic” works and writers that established the tradition on which later writers built, works and writers that all students of English literature should be familiar with. Four credit hours.

ENGL 271 01: British Literature II
Hemenway, Stephen
MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM

Enter the world of ancient mariners, solitary reapers, Grecian urns, opium-eaters, angels of the house, night winds, goblin markets, speckled bands, garden parties, trenches, waste lands, fern hills, burned books, dumb waiters, cowboys, the prophet's hair. This scintillating survey course will introduce you to the major movements and writers in Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Commonwealth during the Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern Eras (roughly 1773-2014 or about 240 years). The literary canon (dead but vital white male poets, such as Blake, Keats, Tennyson, Eliot, and Auden) will be augmented by wondrous women warriors (Austen, Shelley, Woolf, Mansfield, and Lessing), Irish giants (Shaw, Wilde, Joyce, Yeats, and Heaney), and fresh Commonwealth voices (Rhys, Soyinka, Gordimer, Munro, and Rushdie). Most of the readings are poems and short stories, but dramas and essays are also prominent. Forging links between geographical centers, genders, genres, races, and critical approaches will be among the impossible dreams of the teacher. Three tests and/or innovative test alternatives will measure your mastery of material. Three papers and/or nonpapers (musical, artistic, sculptural, choreographic, cinematic options) or a longer research project will engage your scholarly and creative impulses. Journal entries will keep you on your toes. You will move from "The Songs of Innocence" to the "The Moment before the Gun Went Off." Four credit hours.

ENGL 279 01: Writing for Teachers
Trembley, Elizabeth
MW 1:00 PM 2:50 PM

This workshop course will help its members become better writing teachers by first becoming better writers. You will become more energetic, attuned, and agile writers in multiple genres. You’ll have chances to play with fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and even scripts and the graphic “novel” form! As we become more experienced with the techniques needed to write the kinds of works readers love to read, we’ll also explore how you, future teachers, will teach writing to your future students--including uses of technology. Together we will form a community founded on respect for each person as a writer, dedicated to helping each and every person in class become a better writer and teacher of writing.

This is a blended learning course. Feel free to contact me before registration if you have questions.

Four credit hours.

ENGL 280 01: American Literature I
Verduin, Kathleen
MWF 1:00 PM 1:50 PM

“ America is a poem in our eyes,” wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson, and the metaphor is apt: America is not simply a geographical space but an idea, a creation of the imagination, ever new and ever-changing—and much of what we contemplate as “American” arises from the testaments of our writers. This course surveys American literature from its beginnings to the era of the Civil War, a period when the snide British taunt “Who reads an American book?” was finally laid to rest. To crush such a rich heritage into a single semester seems a travesty, particularly since the American literary canon—those works deemed worthy of study and of perpetuation in the classroom—has undergone such dramatic change since the establishment of American literature as an academic province some hundred years ago. Still, a course like this can make a start, exposing students to American writers, American literary history, and the juxtaposition of literature with culture. The redoubtable Norton Anthology of American Literature, even in its shorter edition, provides a virtually inexhaustible resource. By the end of the semester, we all should know American literature a lot better: but if all goes as planned, we should also know a lot more about ourselves. Three examinations, three critical essays, weekly reaction papers.

ENGL 281 01: American Literature II
Verduin, Kathleen
MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM

America lives in its literature. History shows us events: literature pictures, responds, incarnates. Rejoices. Sorrows. Brings to life. This course surveys the American past from the end of the Civil War—and marches prophetically into the future. We will watch as American writers (Henry James, Henry Adams, Edith Wharton) define their country in contrast with Europe; as Civil War veterans (Mark Twain, Stephen Crane, Ambrose Bierce) confront that apocalypse; as African Americans (Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois) struggle to find their place; as Native Americans (Sarah Winnemucca, Zitkala) unfold their stories; as women (Emily Dickinson, Charlotte Perkins Gilman) explore the complexities of their condition; as the West is won, stolen, commandeered (Bret Hart, Jack London). We will trace the rise of Modernism (T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell), the explosion of new fiction in the 1920s (Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen), the confrontation of darkness in small towns (Sherwood Anderson) and rural strongholds (Robert Frost), the assertion of regional difference (Jean Toomer, William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor), the establishment of a genuinely American theatre (Eugene O’Neill, Arthur Miller). We will exult in the carnivalesque variety of American literature in the last half-century (Tennessee Williams, Bernard Malamud, the Beats, Joyce Carol Oates)—and soberly reflect on still festering wounds in the social fabric (James Baldwin, John Updike, Yusef Komunyakaa). And in the process we’ll get to know ourselves better. A lot better.

Three examinations, four critical papers, one short research project. Four credit hours.

ENGL 295 01: African American Lit
Parker, Kendra
TR 9:30 AM 10:50 AM

The main premise of this course is that literature directly reflects the people who produce it.

English 295: Introduction to African American Literature is a special topics course for non-English majors as well as English majors and minors. This course, intended to provide a historical and an aesthetic context for the study of the folk and literary productions of African Americans from the colonial period up until 1940, will expose students to a range of genres: essays, novellas, short fiction, poetry, and literary criticism.

This survey of African American literature focuses on the formation and development of the African American literary tradition. Survey courses, by definition, cannot explore the full range of “significant” works; therefore, you will be exposed to the authors and texts that African American literature scholars consider the most representative of the period that governs our study. In addition to studying representative primary texts, we will also investigate and discuss the social, literary, and cultural environment in which these texts were produced.

ENGL 295 02: Gender & Sexuality in Chinese Literature & Society
Shih, Ling-Ling
TR 3:30 PM 4:50 PM

In this course, through the reading and discussion of literary works and oral history/autobiography, we will examine changing gender relations and women's roles in ancient and modern China, with a focus on the 20th century. The instructor will provide lectures on general historical, biographical, and literary background for the assigned readings, but students will participate in active discussions of their assigned readings. The goal of this course is to help students develop an appreciation and critical analytic skill for reading Chinese Women's literature. It also aims to help students gain an understanding of the socio-political developments that gave rise to new gender relations and roles in modern and contemporary Chinese society; the intricate relationship between these societal changes and the development of modern Chinese literature--feminist literature in particular; and the influence of changing Chinese literary thoughts on the representation of women in literature. There are no prerequisites for the course. All readings are in English.

ENGL 354 01: Intermediate Creative Writing: Novel
Trembley, Elizabeth
M 5:30 PM 8:20 PM

4 credits, FA2

By Spring Break, YOU COULD BE A NOVELIST!

Many people who want to write novels start, but never finish. This course provides you with the techniques and support to structure a novel and then write one—a complete first draft of a minimum of 50,000 words, in only four weeks! (Yes, really.)

The structure of the course is roughly this: until Winter Break, we’ll prepare. This means we will study story structure, craft, writing technology and building support networks. You’ll read (and watch films) like writers, studying and practicing structure and technique. You will also learn to write in a different sort of software designed to support the way writers work (and way better than a regular word processor). Assessment will be on your gathering and working with this information.

In between breaks, you’ll draft your novel in all its reckless, imaginative, energetic wonder (using the model of National Novel Writing Month—check it out at www.nanowrimo.org). With weekly pep rallies and individual conferences, you’ll complete a short novel of about 50,000 words (yes, you will!). In this part of the course, we’ll value enthusiasm and perseverance over craft. Assessment? Because of the limited time, the only things that will matter during this month are output quantity and the quality of your dedication to your work and that of your classmates. You’ll have permission to lower your expectations, risk, experiment and see what you can do. To build without tearing down.

In the last five weeks we’ll focus on re-visioning our works, both at the level of story and scene. We’ll study and experiment with issues including narrative structure, characterization, point of view, setting, significant detail and the like. Here you’ll be assessed on your command of the content of our reading and your willingness to experiment with re-vision. We’ll also present polished chunks of our drafted work for advanced workshops. You’ll be assessed on your polished work as well as on the quality of your analysis of other students’ works. We’ll also spend time learning how to approach the publishing world.

Is your blood tingling at the very thought? Great! Recruit some friends. Remember that permission of instructor is needed for this class. (Everyone is eligible—I just want to talk to you so you know what you’re getting into!) Sign up on my door, Lubbers 306, for an appointment or email me!

ENGL 355 01: Intermediate Creative Writing: Poems
Childress, Susanna
TR 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

Where does poetry come from—what place inside you? What is its purpose, and what are poetry’s possible “abilities”—what does it do, both as a writer and also for readers, for society at large? We’ll press into these questions in 355, both slantwise, as Emily Dickinson would have it (“Tell all the truth but tell it slant—”), and in straightforward ways, through texts like Gregory Orr’s Poetry as Survival, Joy Harjo’s memoir, Crazy Brave, and the poetry anthology I Go to the Ruined Place: Contemporary Poems in Defense of Global Human Rights. We’ll also, of course, be writing our own poems, both in free verse/open form and in received forms. So we’ll be reading lots and lots of poems, closely, carefully, and we’ll be writing lots and lots as well. You’ll want to be comfortable doing both, but come to this workshop ready to re-think your ideas about poetry and be willing to take risks with your writing.

ENGL 360 01: Modern English Grammar
Verduin, Kathleen
MWF 11:00 AM 11:50 AM

Grounded in the State of Michigan’s standards for English teachers, this course will enable you to teach writing on the elementary and secondary levels—and, let’s hope, make you a better, more confident writer yourself. We will start by identifying common errors—those small but irritating mistakes that can make you look ignorant—and then progress to an understanding of the parts of speech, the basic forms of words, the principles of correct and sophisticated sentence structure, and the art (yes, art!) of skillful punctuation. A good deal of our activity, though, will focus on the diagramming of sentences: a daunting prospect for the novice, but eventually such a joy that it’s been called more fun than Sudoku! You will soon be batting around terms like “noun clause,” “adjectival,” “phrasal verb,” and “morpheme” as if you had known them all your life. And you will also gain a sense of how grammar—a word which means many things to many people—has become a thorny social and even political issue.
Four tests; numerous exercises; production of one error-free academic paper.

ENGL 371 01: Old and Middle English
Gruenler, Curtis
MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM

Old and Middle English: Foundations of English Literature

Hwæt! We Hopinga heortan gefrunon, hu hie tungan aldan geleornian wille. (So, we have heard of the courage and desire of the Hopings, how they want to learn old tongues.)

This course will give you a start in learning the Old and Middle English languages, enough to begin to enjoy Old and Middle English literature in their original languages. Old English is almost like learning a foreign language, so we will focus intensively on short passages chosen to represent central features of Old English literature and culture. After half a semester spent on Old English, Middle English (the language of Chaucer) will seem like a breeze. We will read some longer stories, such as chivalric romances, selections from the visionary Christian allegory known as Piers Plowman, the mystical visions of Julian of Norwich, and/or some of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales—works that did the most with the possibilities of English as it was changing during the Middle English period and laid down the tracks along which the rest of English literature has developed. We will also think about the special considerations involved in studying texts that survive only in manuscripts and preserve a close relationship to oral culture. Requirements may include options such as translation exercises and critiques, close analysis of passages, papers on interesting words, or a larger research project. This is a new course and I am very willing to adapt it to the interests of participants.

The first line above, by the way, is based on the opening sentence of the Old English Beowulf. You will learn enough to be able to compose something like that, but you won’t be required to.

ENGL 373 01: Novels of Crime and Punishment
Hemenway, Stephen
MWF 2:00 PM 2:50 PM

For more than four decades, I have used the theme of "Crime and Punishment" as a gateway for students in my Expository Writing I courses to perfect their prose style. Maybe your parents or grandparents took this course! I always included a few classic or contemporary novels to provoke and challenge students to think about problems of law and order, cops and robbers, race and gender, justice and mercy. Now I would like to revisit some of those novels as well as explore other novels dealing with crime and punishment. This time the focus will be more on literary analysis from a variety of critical perspectives.

Here are the probable authors and titles for this course: Josie Gordon (pen name for Hope English Professor Elizabeth Trembley), Whacked; Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange; Albert Camus, The Stranger; Ernest Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying; Jane Hamilton, Disobedience; Oscar Hijuelos, Mr. Ives' Christmas; Gloria Naylor, The Women of Brewster Place; Joyce Carol Oates, Rape: A Love Story; Dalton Trumbo, Johnny Got His Gun; and, of course, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment. A few short stories and film versions of novels will add flavor and ease transitions between longer works.

Journal responses, short papers, and a research project will be the major determinants for grades, but class participation will also be a significant factor. I think of this class as a book club for fiction lovers majoring in any subject from architecture to zoology.

ENGL 373 02: Shakespeare's Plays
Cox, John
MW 3:00 PM 4:20 PM

The textbook for this course organizes Shakespeare's plays into four kinds, or "genres": comedy, history, tragedy, and romance. The first "complete works" edition (the so-called First Folio, published in 1623) uses a similar organizing strategy, but it omits "romance" and often puts plays in very different categories from those a modern editor would select for them. Who is right, in a case like this, and why? How much did Shakespeare himself think in terms of genre, as he wrote his plays? Does genre have a fixed identity, or is it a cultural construct? This course will approach Shakespeare's plays by raising questions about the identity of dramatic form, trying to understand, as best we can, how the plays came to have the shape they do. An important question is whether film constitutes a new genre. Is Branagh's Hamlet a different kind of work from a stage production of the play? To help answer this question, the course will strongly emphasize filmed versions of the plays, using the extensive DVD and videotape collection in the VanWylen Library. Four credit hours.

ENGL 373 03: Lit for Children & Adolescents
Portfleet, Dianne
TR 12:00 PM 1:20 PM

This course will focus on reading many works of Adolescent and Children's Literature, with 60% of the readings being Cross Cultural Readings. Reading and analyzing what we have read will be for the purpose of writing a literary theory of your own at the end of the semester, so that you can on your own discern poor, good, and excellent literature and have solid reasons for your decisions. Your final exam for the course will be your completed literary theory. The course will be mainly discussion of the works we are reading and deciding the quality of each of our readings as the semester progresses. It will be a fun course, for the books chosen to be read are all award-winning books. This course is designed to stimulate your imaginations, help your critical thinking skills, rekindle a love of reading for pleasure in your lives, and prepare you to discern quality literature and movies on your own.

ENGL 380 01: Teaching Secondary School English
Moreau, William
M 4:00 PM 5:50 PM

Are you an English major who wants to be an English teacher in a secondary school? Are you an English minor who may end up teaching some English as part of your future career choice? If either of these situations fits you, this class is designed to help. We'll learn concrete, practical methods for choosing and teaching literature, for teaching and evaluating the process of writing, and for presenting the study of grammar and usage. Topics of interest related to the profession of classroom teaching as a whole will also be shared. Class sessions will include informal lectures, student projects and presentations, and discussions. Reading will be from texts to be named later, and a mountain of handouts. Three credits total—two for the class, one for a field experience TBA.

ENGL 381 01: Teaching Secondary School English Field Placement
Moreau, William

See info for English 380.01.

ENGL 454 01: Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction
Childress, Susanna
TR 3:00 PM 4:20 PM

In this advanced fiction workshop, we will be focusing on linked short stories. We’ll read several prominent linked collections, including Pulitzer-winners Olive Kitteridge and A Good Scent from a Strange Mountain. We’ll be examining how short story cycles work and what distinguishes them from novels. We’ll also be writing and workshopping four linked short stories (roughly 40 pages), reviewing linked collections in small groups, and preparing questions for visiting writers and other potential interviewees (including authors of our course texts). Be ready to read, read, read, and write, write, write! Be prepared to interact with other linked-story lovers and knowledgeably approach issues of craft/technique surrounding fiction and the short story. Because of the advanced nature of the course, students must gain approval from the professor prior to admittance (please email childress@hope.edu with 1) your year, 2) your major/minor, and 3) a 10-page portfolio).

ENGL 455 01: Advanced Creative Writing: Poems
Peschiera, Pablo
M 5:30 PM 8:20 PM

Please contact faculty member for more information.