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Saturday, February 2, 2013

Schedule and Event Locations

Seminar Descriptions


All seminars are free, but we’d like you to register for
them so we can plan for enough seating for each session.
To make a reservation please contact:
Julie Huisingh, (616) 395-7860, huisingh@hope.edu

9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Registration

Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue


9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Celebrating Hope College’s Early Graduates
Professors Alfredo Gonzales, John Yelding
and Fumihito Andy Nakajima
Ballroom 1 & 2
Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue



Preparation, Hard Work, and Luck: A Guide to the Development of a New Chemical Reaction
Dr. Jeffrey Johnson
Gentex/Trans-matic Room
Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue



Making Youth Sports Safer for the Mind, Body, and Spirit
Dr. Kirk Brumels ’88 and Dr. Scott VanderStoep ’87
Donnelly Dining Room
H
aworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

A Good Fight: Loyalty and Conflict in the RCA
Dr. Lynn Japinga ’81
Ballroom 1 & 2
Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue



Electrical Stimulation as a Treatment
Option for Phantom Limb Pain

Dr. Katie Polasek
Gentex/Trans-matic Room
Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue



Making Democracy: Lessons from 19th Century London

Dr. Marc Baer
Donnelly Dining Room
H
aworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue

12:30 p.m.
Luncheon with a musical presentation.
($12 per person, advanced reservation required)
Ballroom 3
Haworth Inn and Conference Center, 225 College Avenue

 

Top: Kumaji Kimura, Motoichiro Oghimi; bottom:
James Collins Ottipoby, James Carter Dooley Jr.

Paintings by Paul Collins of Grand Rapids

2 p.m.
Reception showcasing the debut of portraits honoring four of Hope College’s first international and minority graduates
more information
second-floor rotunda
Martha Miller Center for Global Communication



3 p.m.
Basketball Game (Adults $6, General Admission)
Hope Men vs. Albion
Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse


 

2013 SEMINARS


Celebrating Hope College’s Early Graduates

Professors Alfredo Gonzales, John Yelding
and Fumihito Andy Nakajiman

9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

Diversity, inclusion and global education are not new trends at Hope. Rather, they have been present since the foundation of the college. Immigrant founders, who understood the value of education and need for inclusion in a new nation, believed (remove) that that the education of international students was necessary as Hope College began living into its mission. Understood from this historical perspective, it should not be surprising to learn that in the Class of 1879 two of the six graduates were from Japan; nor should we be surprised that the commencement address for this class was delivered in Japanese and Latin. The admission and the subsequent graduation of Kumaji Kimura and Motochiro Oghimi set in motion the later graduation in 1925 of the first Native American, James Ottipoby, and in 1932 the first African American, James Carter Dooley. This legacy of inclusion and global learning is today found in the mission of Hope College as it seeks “to educate for lives of service and leadership in a global society.” It is this legacy and the impressive stories of these early graduates that we will celebrate during Winter Happening 2013.

Alfredo M. Gonzales is Associate Provost, Dean for International and Multicultural Education. In this capacity he directs the advancement of diversity and global learning at Hope College.

John Yelding, associate professor of Education, has been teaching at Hope since 1994. He specializes in secondary education / multiculturalism / rural education.

Fumihito Andy Nakajima, associate professor of Japanese, has been teaching Japanese language, history, and culture at Hope since 1996.


Preparation, Hard Work, and Luck:
A Guide to the Development of
a New Chemical Reaction

Dr. Jeffrey Johnson
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.

In the Johnson group at Hope College, student research focuses on the investigation of the molecular nature of chemical reactions and the development of organic reactions. A new organic transformation is much like adding a new tool to the chemist’s toolbox—simply put, while a nailgun won’t change the shingles that ultimately top your house, it can make installation significantly more efficient than the use of a hammer. Likewise, a new organic transformation can shorten a synthetic route and provide more efficient and cost effective production of a complex molecule. This presentation will illustrate, in layman’s terms, our study of chemical reactions: the techniques used to develop molecular understanding, the characteristics of a desirable reaction, and the role of hard work—and luck.

Jeffrey B. Johnson, assistant professor of chemistry and Towsley Research Scholar, joined Hope College in 2007. He has since mentored over 35 undergraduate researchers pursuing the mechanistic investigation of transition-metal catalyzed processes and the development of new organic chemistry reactions. This work has resulted in numerous peer-reviewed publications with student coauthors, including two in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. While at Hope, he has received over $1 million in external funding, highlighted by an NSF CAREER award.


Making Youth Sports Safer
for the Mind, Body, and Spirit

Dr. Kirk Brumels ’88 and Dr. Scott VanderStoep ’87
9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.


Over 30 million American young people participate in youth sports every year. Dr. Brumels and Dr. VanderStoep have collected data on injuries in youth sports, perceptions of parents, and perceptions of youth and collegiate athletes. They will share their thoughts on the current status of youth sports, focusing on early athletic specialization, sports injury, and the role of parents.

Scott Vander Stoep ’87 is professor of psychology and Dean for Social Sciences. He taught at Hope from 1992-94 and rejoined the faculty in 1999. For five years he directed the Frost Research Center. He served as department chair from 2006-2012.

Kirk Brumels, PhD, AT, ATC is the director of the Hope College Athletic Training Program, associate professor of kinesiology, and Athletic Trainer. Brumels joined the Hope faculty in 2001 after 11 years as an athletic trainer for the New England Patriots of the National Football League. Brumels currently provides clinical care to Hope College athletes, and teaches in the Athletic Training and Human Anatomy programs.


A Good Fight:
Loyalty and Conflict in the RCA

Dr. Lynn Japinga ’81
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

As a church-related college, the history of Hope College has always been intertwined with the history of the Reformed Church in America. In the last 70 years, since the end of WWII, the RCA has experienced significant conflicts over ecumenism, the interpretation of the Bible, and the nature of the church. In the late 1940s, the late 1960s, and the late 1970s, conflict was so severe that there was talk of dividing the denomination. Each time, the RCA got through the crisis, in part because the denomination has a strong sense of family and its members and ministers felt loyal to and connected with the RCA. This
seminar will provide a brief overview of the history of the RCA from 1945 to 1994, with a focus on conflict and attempts at resolution.

Lynn Japinga, professor of religion, received her BA from Hope College, her M.Div from Princeton Theological Seminary, and her Ph.D from Union Seminary (New York). She began teaching at Hope in 1992. She teaches American Religious history, women's studies, and senior seminars. She is an ordained minister in the Reformed Church in America and has served as an interim preaching pastor at Hope Church, Holland.



Electrical stimulation as a Treatment
Option for Phantom Limb Pains

Dr. Katie Polasek
11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

Phantom limb sensations, or sensations that seem to be coming from the missing limb, occur in most individuals with amputations. These sensations range from mild to extremely painful. One proposed mechanism for these odd sensations is improper connections between the part of the brain that used to receive input from the missing limb and adjacent brain areas. Dr. Polasek's research team is looking at using electrical stimulation of nerves in the residual limb to send more 'normal' sensations to the brain that will seem to be from the missing limb. The goal is to strengthen the old connections and weaken the improper ones and that this will reduce or eliminate these painful sensations. Dr. Polasek will present this idea in detail as well as results from her preliminary work in this area.

Katie Polasek, assistant professor of engineering, joined the engineering department in 2010 after completing a post-doctoral fellowship in Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. She has enjoyed incorporating biomedical engineering into her electrical circuits class and looks forward to seeing the first Hope student to graduate with an emphasis in Biomedical engineering this year.


Making Democracy:
Lessons from 19th Century London

Dr. Marc Baer

11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.

From the American and French revolutions through the Arab Spring, the birth of democracy seems to depend on political cataclysms for its creation. Using insights from two decades of scholarship and his recently published book, The Rise and Fall of Radical Westminster, 1780 – 1890, Hope history professor Marc Baer will discuss how Britain’s most radical and contentious political site in the 18th century became the most conservative and tranquil by the end of the 19th century. In so doing, Westminster, in London’s West End, provided Britain an alternative path to inventing democracy.

Marc Baer joined the Hope faculty in 1983, and since then has taught a variety of courses in British and Irish history. He is now professor of history and chair of the department. He has authored two books and numerous research articles and scholarly reviews. Besides his teaching and research, every two years he helps to organize the Hope College Veritas Forum. He was also the founding director of Hope’s Pew Society, which helps students to consider and prepare for graduate school and careers as professors.

For additional information, please contact:
Lynne Powe ’86, (616) 395-7860, powe@hope.edu