/ Kruizenga Art Museum

John H. Dryfhout '64 Internship

Created by an endowment gift from John H. Dryfhout ’64, the John H. Dryfhout ’64 Internship supports student training and involvement in curatorial and collection management projects at the Kruizenga Art Museum. The goal of the internship is to provide students with hands-on experience in different aspects of museum work, so that they might be encouraged to pursue museum careers after graduating from Hope.

The John H. Dryfhout ’64 Internship Program at the Kruizenga Art Museum (KAM) is open to Hope College sophomores, juniors and seniors from any department who have completed at least one course in the Department of Art and Art History. Students interested in the John H. Dryfhout ’64 Internship Program may contact the museum director, Charles Mason, for more information.

Internship Projects

2019
Garrett Fixx '20 examing art for the KAM's "Deities and Devotion" exhibitionGarrett Fixx ’20 prepared artworks for display and assisted with exhibition design for the KAM's fall 2019 exhibition, Deities and Devotion in Mongolian Buddhist Art.
2018

Charles Mason, Caleigh White '20 and Dr. Debra Swanson examing works from the KAM's "Once Were Nomads" exhibitionCaleigh White ’20 researched artworks and wrote catalog entries and exhibition labels for the KAM's spring 2019 exhibition, Once Were Nomads: Textiles and Culture in Baluchistan.


Art works on display in the KAM's "Living Tradition" exhibitionNina Kay ’19 researched artworks and wrote catalog entries and exhibition labels for the KAM's fall 2018 exhibition, Living Tradition: Contemporary Ethiopian Christian Art from the Sobania Collection.

2017

Art works on display in the KAM's "Beyond the Stars" exhibitionMason Hunt ’18 and Madeleine Zimmerman ’20 researched artworks and wrote catalog entries and exhibition labels for the KAM's fall 2017 exhibition, From Beyond the Stars: Innovation and Inspiration in Meiji Japanese Art. 

2016

Heroic Red TaraMonica Czechowicz ’16 cataloged and photographed a large donation of Mongolian paintings. 

Image: Heroic Red Tara, Mongolian, 19th Century, Pigments on gold and sized cloth; silver and glass case (Gift of David Kamansky and Gerald Wheaton)