Religion

The broad academic purpose of the study of religion at Hope College is to understand the Christian faith and the role of religion in human society.

To accomplish that end, the Department of Religion divides its field into four areas of academic investigation: biblical studies, historical studies, theological studies and world religions. Some students concentrate in one of those areas and develop a considerable expertise. Others combine their religion major with another (such as biology, English, or psychology) and "double major". Whether they choose greater depth or greater breadth, however, students find the focus provided by a religion major to be an excellent way of centering their liberal arts education at Hope College.

Students majoring in religion participate in a wide variety of academic and service activities which include:

  • Assisting professors with research programs
  • Enrolling in The Philadelphia Center or the Chicago Semester to investigate alternative ministries in an urban setting
  • Leading youth groups, both denominational and non-denominational, in area churches

Students in Religion often go on to remarkable and accomplished careers as:

  • Youth ministers, pastors, priests, and chaplains (hospital, military, hospice)
  • Lay church workers, summer camp directors, and immersion trip leaders
  • Serving as a counselor with a Christian agency
  • Missionaries, translators, and leaders in non-profit organizations
  • College Professors in Religion, Theology, Biblical Studies, History and Philosophy

Graduates with Religion as second major or Minor attract the attention of Graduate Schools and Employers looking for critical thinking, breadth of perspective, and cultural sensitivity and competence.

Hope Religion graduates have excelled in the following fields among others:

  • Counseling and Social Work
  • News Media and Social Media
  • Medicine
  • Secondary Education
  • Library Science
  • Law School
  • Politics and Government

Options for religion majors and minors include seminars or individual research and, in consultation with the department chairperson, the opportunity to fulfill selected required courses through a tutorial reading program. The program has been endorsed and recommended by graduate theological seminaries for students preparing for church vocations.

RELIGION OFFERINGS FOR THE ALL-COLLEGE REQUIREMENTS

Studies in the department are an integral part of the college curriculum. Six credits in religion are required for graduation: a two-credit basic studies in Religion course (REL 100) and one four-credit introductory course in religion (REL 220’s, 240’s, 260’s, or 280’s).

Majors

The Department of Religion is a department within the Humanities Division presenting an area of study and research which students may choose as the focus of their liberal arts education. The Department of Religion is comprised of four fields: Biblical Studies, Historical Studies, Theological Studies and Studies in World Religions.  There are four Religion Majors from which to choose:

  1. Biblical Studies
  2. Christian History and Theology
  3. Ethics, Culture and Social Witness
  4. Standard Religion Major

Religion 100 does not count toward any major. The details of each major are outlined below.

A student with special interests and objectives may apply to the department for a "contracted religion major" which consists of  16 credits at the introductory 200-level  and 16 credits of advanced work in religion appropriate to the academic and vocational interests of the student.

Biblical Studies

Introductory Courses (12 credits)

Biblical Language (4 credits)

Students must take 4 credits in either Greek or Hebrew language.

Foundations (8 credits)

Students must take one of the following 200-level courses and 281.

  • REL 221 – Intro to Biblical Literature OR
  • REL 222 – Intro to the Old Testament OR
  • REL 223 – Intro to the New Testament
  • REL 281 – Intro to World Religions

Advanced Courses (20 credits)

Biblical Corpus Studies (8 or 12 credits). Students must take at least two of the following Religion courses, one in Old Testament and one in New Testament:

  • REL 321 – Pentateuch: The Torah of the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 322 – Prophets and Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 323 – Psalms, Wisdom, and Apocalypse in the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 324 – Luke-Acts
  • REL 325 – Jesus and the Gospels
  • REL 326 – The Bible and Archaeology
  • REL 327 – Late New Testament and Early Christian Writings
  • REL 328 – Johannine Literature
  • REL 329 – Studies in Scripture

Electives (4 or 8 credits)

Students must take at least one Religion elective, not listed above, outside Biblical Studies (i.e. any non-biblical studies Religion course at the 300 level).

Research Seminar (4 credits)

Students must take a 400 level research seminar.

Independent Study (1-4 credits)

Students may take REL 490.

Christian History and Theology

Introductory Courses (16 credits)

Students must take 4 courses, one in each area (220's, 241, 260's and 281).

  • REL 221 – Intro to Biblical Literature OR
  • REL 222 – Intro to the Old Testament OR
  • REL 223 – Intro to the New Testament
  • REL 241 – Intro to the History of Christianity
  • REL 261 – Faith Seeking Understanding OR
  • REL 262 – Prayer, Creed, Commandments OR
  • REL 263 – Perspectives on Christ
  • REL 281 – Intro to World Religions

Advanced Courses (16 credits)

Students must take 16 credits at the 300 and 400 level. They must be in both history and theology. Students may take one 300 level course in Scripture.

  • REL 344 – Christianity & the Middle Ages
  • REL 345 – The Reformation
  • REL 346 – Women in American Religious History
  • REL 362 – Feminist Theology
  • REL 363 – Studies in Christian Spirituality
  • REL 364 – Philosophical Theology
  • REL 366 – World Christianity
  • REL 367 – Reformed Theology
  • REL 368 – Christian Doctrine
  • REL 369 – Studies in Christian Theology

Research Seminar (4 credits)

Students must take a 400 level research seminar.

Independent Study (1-4 credits)

Students may take REL 490.

Ethics, Culture, and Social Witness

Introductory Courses (12 credits)

Students must take three courses; 265, 281 and one from the remaining listed courses:

  • REL 265 – Ethics and Christian Discipleship
  • REL 281 – Introduction to World Religions
  • REL 242 – Religion in America OR
  • REL 261 – Faith Seeking Understanding OR
  • REL 262 – Prayer, Creed, Commandments OR
  • REL 264 – Christian Feminism OR
  • REL 266 – Christian Love OR
  • REL 295 – Learning and Serving Among the Oglala Lakota (May Term)

Interdisciplinary Elective (4 credits)

Students must take one 4 credit course or one pair of 2 credit courses:

  • ENV 377 – Environmental Philosophy & History
  • POL 110 – Race and Politics AND
  • SOC 269 – Race and Ethnic Relations
  • POL 110 – Global Political Development AND
  • POL 110 – Gender, Conflict, and Peace
  • POL 301 – Religion and Politics
  • POL 352 – Global Political Economy
  • SOC 281 – Sociology of Popular Culture
  • SOC 312 – Urban Sociology
  • SOC 341 – Sociology of Religion
  • SOC 365 – Social Movements

Advanced Courses (16 credits)

Students must take three courses at the 300 level:

  • REL 322 – Prophets & Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 345 – The Reformation
  • REL 346 – Women in American History
  • REL 347 – Piety and Politics
  • REL 362 – Feminist Theology
  • REL 365 – Ecological Theology and Ethics
  • REL 366 – World Christianity
  • REL 369 – Special Topics in Christian Theology
  • REL 381 – Studies in Islam
  • REL 383 – Religions of India

Research Seminar (4 credits)

Students must take a 400 level research seminar.

Independent Study (1-4 credits)

Students may take REL 490.

Standard Religion Major

This major includes four 4-credit introductory courses in religion (220s, 240s, 260s, 280s) and four 4-credit courses at the 300 and 400 level. Three of the four fields of religion must be represented among the four courses at the 300/400 level. One course must be a 400 level seminar. One 300 level course must be an independent study

Introductory Courses (16 credits)

  • REL 221 – Intro to Biblical Literature OR
  • REL 222 – Intro to the Old Testament OR
  • REL 223 – Intro to the New Testament
  • REL 241 – Intro to the History of Christianity OR
  • REL 242 – Religion in America
  • REL 261 – Faith Seeking Understanding OR
  • REL 262 – Prayer, Creed, Commandments OR
  • REL 263 – Perspectives on Christ OR
  • REL 264 – Christian Feminism OR
  • REL 265 – Ethics and Christian Discipleship OR
  • REL 266 – Christian Love
  • REL 281 – Introduction to World Religions
Advanced Courses (16 credits)

One of these must be a Religion seminar (400 level course), although you can take more than one; three of the four fields of religion (Biblical Studies, Historical Studies, Theological Studies and World Religions) must be represented among the four courses at the advanced level. One of the advanced level courses may be an independent study.

Biblical Studies

  • REL 321 – Pentateuch
  • REL 322 – Prophets and Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 323 – Psalms, Wisdom and Apocalypse in the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 324 – Luke-Acts
  • REL 325 – Jesus and the Gospels
  • REL 326 – Bible and Archaeology
  • REL 327 – Late New Testament & Early Christian Writings
  • REL 328 – Johannine Literature
  • REL 329 – Studies in Scripture or a 420 course

Historical Studies

  • REL 344 – Christianity in the Middle Ages
  • REL 345 – The Reformation
  • REL 346 – Women in American Religious History
  • REL 349 – Studies in Religious History or a 440 course

Theological Studies

  • REL 362 – Feminist Theology
  • REL 363 – Studies in Christian Spirituality
  • REL 364 – Philosophical Theology
  • REL 365 – Ecological Theology and Ethics
  • REL 366 – World Christianity
  • REL 367 – Reformed Theology
  • REL 368 – Christian Doctrine
  • REL 369 – Studies in Theology or a 460 course

World Religion

  • REL 381 – Religions of India
  • REL 383 – Studies in Islam
  • REL 389 – Studies in World Religions or a 480 course

Religion Seminar

  • REL 420 – Seminar in Scripture
  • REL 440 – Seminar in the History of Christianity
  • REL 460 – Seminar in Theology/Ethics
  • REL 480 – Seminar in World Religions

Minors

Religion

A minor consists of a minimum of 20 credits, including three courses at the 200 level, one four-credit course at the 300 level, and a 400-level seminar. Religion 100 does not count toward a minor.

Studies in Ministry

The Studies in Ministry minor is dedicated to preparing students, theologically and practically, for lay ministry positions in churches and para-church organizations. It aims to provide students who have a vocational interest in Christian service with the theological framework, practical experience, spiritual disciplines and mentoring guidance necessary to embark upon a lifetime of involvement in Christian ministries.

Through coursework, year-long internships and relationships with each other and mentors, students in this program will be prepared for possible future theological education and various entry-level ministry positions in churches and organizations – locally and worldwide. The minor has three different tracks: Youth Ministry, Worship Leadership, and Social Witness. Depending on the courses and track chosen, the minor will comprise 25 to 30 hours, to be distributed across required courses, electives and an internship.

Hebrew

295. Studies in Hebrew — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
0-4 Credits | As Needed

Religion

195. Studies in Religion — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-2 Credits | As Needed

295. Topics in Religion — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

395. Studies in Religion — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

Basic Studies In Religion

100. Basic Studies in Religion — The course is designed to introduce students to the content and methods in the study of religion. A variety of topics are available each semester, varying by instructor. Topics range across the fields of biblical studies, theology and ethics, church history, and world religions. Religion 100 may be taken for credit only once; exceptions are granted by the chairperson in unusual circumstances.
2 Credits | Fall, Spring | Religious Studies I (RL1)

Classical Languages Courses

171. Biblical Hebrew I — An introduction to classical Biblical Hebrew as found in the Hebrew Bible, the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. For students with no previous study of Hebrew. Cross-listed with Rel 171.
4 Credits | Fall, alternate years

172. Biblical Hebrew II — Continuation of Biblical Hebrew I. This course is the second course in the sequence Rel 171/Hebr 171 (fall semester) and Rel 172/Hebr 172 (spring semester). Instruction in grammar will focus on Hebrew syntax and building vocabulary. Students will read texts from the Hebrew Bible, including the complete books of Jonah and Ruth. Cross-listed with Rel 172. Rel 171 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring, alternate years | Second Language (FL2)

Introductory Religion Courses

221. Introduction to Biblical Literature — An introductory study of the history and theology of the Old and New Testaments.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Religious Studies II (RL2)

222. Introduction to Old Testament — This course concentrates on the first part of the Christian Bible, also called the Old Testament or Hebrew Bible, and is a survey of its contents: historical events, main characters, literary forms, and religious concepts. This course provides basic training in how to read a text that is more than two thousand years old and arose out of an ancient culture with very different conceptual and worldview structures than ours. Since this material is also essential background for understanding the New Testament, connections will be made throughout the course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Religious Studies II (RL2)

223. Introduction to New Testament — This course concentrates on the second part of the Christian Bible, also called the New Testament. It is an introductory survey of its contents: historical background, literary forms, main characters, and central religious concepts. This course provides basic training in how to read this most important ancient text.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Religious Studies II (RL2)

241. Introduction to the History of Christianity — An introductory study of the history of Christianity.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Religious Studies II (RL2)

242. Religion in America — This course explores the history of religion in America from the Reformation to the present, with an emphasis on religion as a source of social change.
4 Credits | As Needed | Religious Studies II (RL2)

261. Faith Seeking Understanding — This course introduces students to the study of Christian theology by following the order of the Apostles’ Creed. Alert to contemporary issues of culture and belief, this course roots faithful Christian reflection in a constructive and informed dialogue with the history of Christianity. Students carefully read and discuss classical figures and texts as they study beliefs about God, creation, humanity, evil, Jesus Christ, salvation, and the Church.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Religious Studies II (RL2)

262. The Prayer, The Creed, The Commandments — A study of Christian theology through the careful reading and discussion of three crucial documents: the Lord’s Prayer, the Apostles’ Creed, and the Ten Commandments. In dialogue with both contemporary issues and the history of Christianity, students learn basic Christian beliefs concerning God, creation, humanity, evil, Jesus Christ, salvation, the Church, and the future.
4 Credits | Spring | Religious Studies II (RL2)

263. Perspectives on Christ — A study of Christian theology through the careful reading and discussion of classical, medieval, early modern, and contemporary texts on the person and work of Jesus Christ. In dialogue with both contemporary issues and the history of Christianity, students learn about basic Christian beliefs concerning God, creation, humanity, evil, Jesus Christ, salvation, the Church, and the future.
4 Credits | Fall | Religious Studies II (RL2)

264. Christian Feminism — A study of the role of women in the Bible, the history of Christianity, and contemporary culture, with an emphasis on the writings of feminist theologians.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD), Religious Studies II (RL2)

265. Ethics and Christian Discipleship — This course involves careful reflection about the connection between Christian beliefs and practices, including the formation of our moral vision and the role of authority in moral decision-making. Special attention is given to the way the Bible is used as a source of moral authority. The course presumes that Christian ethics as an academic discipline is in service of those who seek to live a life of Christian discipleship. To that end, the course invites students to engage in serious, critical reflection about the meaning and practice of discipleship in the context of a variety of contemporary moral challenges.
4 Credits | Spring | Religious Studies II (RL2)

266. Christian Love — This course invites students to explore the concept of love as a moral principle rooted in the Christian tradition and to critically assess a variety of voices and viewpoints related to the role of love in the Christian life. We will examine Christian love as it is expressed in relationship with self, friends, family, marriage partner, neighbors, enemies, and God. Among other themes explored are the relationship between love and sexuality, love and forgiveness, and the unique variety of loves that are part of human life and faithful living.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Religious Studies II (RL2)

267. Introduction to Catholic Christianity — This course aims to introduce students to the rich tradition of Catholic Christianity. To be a Catholic Christian means to have an encounter with the Person of Jesus Christ, an encounter which alters the whole horizon of one’s being. For the Catholic Christian, this necessarily includes an encounter with the Church, Christ’s Body, which is understood as the extension of the Incarnation through time. Through the careful study of Catholic theology, literature, art, and philosophy, students will explore the mystery of what Augustine called “the Whole Christ,” that is, Christ, Head and Body, and how this manifests itself in a distinctively Catholic culture and way of life.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Religious Studies II (RL2)

281. Introduction to World Religions — A historical and geographical survey of some major religions of the world: the religions of India, China, Japan, and the Middle East. Emphasis is placed on the role of religion in the development of the culture and ethos of these areas.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Global Learning International (GLI), Religious Studies II (RL2)

Biblical Studies Courses

321. Pentateuch: The Torah of the Hebrew Bible — A close study of the literature of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy against the background of the Ancient Near East. Rel 100 and a Rel 200-level course are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

322. Prophets and Prophecy in the Hebrew Bible — The prophetic literature of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) includes the historical books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings, also called the Former Prophets, and the Latter prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and the minor prophets). In this course students will read and examine these books in their historical and literary context, and in so doing learn about the historiography and philosophy of history of biblical literature and the nature of biblical prophecy.
4 Credits | As Needed

323. Psalms, Wisdom, Apocalypse in the Hebrew Bible — The writings of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is the third division of the biblical canon. It consists of the Psalms, wisdom literature (Proverbs and Job), the Scrolls (Ruth, Esther, Song of Songs, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations), and the Daniel apocalypse. In this course students will read and study each of the these books and come to understand them as the voice of emerging Judaism as well as essential background to reading the new Testament with deeper meaning.
4 Credits | As Needed

324. Luke-Acts — A study of the two books authored by Luke: his gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. Theological issues relevant to the texts will also be examined.
4 Credits | Spring

325. Jesus and the Gospels — A study of the synoptic gospels and the Gospel of John, focusing on the life and teachings of Jesus, the development of the gospel traditions, and the special interests and concerns of each evangelist.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

326. Bible and Archaeology — An examination of Middle Eastern archaeological and textual discoveries that relate to biblical literature, including their impact on understanding history and religion.
4 Credits | As Needed

327. Late New Testament and Early Christian Writings — A study of late New Testament writings, focusing on Hebrews, James, I Peter, and Revelation. Issues of background, genre, and interpretation will be dealt with. Other late New Testament and early Christian literature will also be examined briefly.
4 Credits | As Needed

328. Johannine Literature — A study of the gospel and epistles of John. Special emphasis will be placed on the exegesis of the Johannine texts and the theological questions which are raised in the interpretation of these writings. This course is taught as a seminar.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

329. Studies in Scripture — A course designed to enable current staff or visiting faculty to teach a course in the area of their current research, and to facilitate cross-listing courses.
4 Credits | As Needed

Historical Studies Courses

344. Christianity in the Middle Ages — The history of the Christian experience from 400-1400, focusing on how Christians articulated belief and acted on religious conviction in the shifting economic, political, cultural, and social environments of the Middle Ages. Rel 241 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

345. The Reformation — The history of religious reform movements from the later Middle Ages through the sixteenth century with an emphasis on Lutheran, Zwinglian, Anabaptist, Calvinist, Anglican, and Roman Catholic reformations and churches. The course will emphasize not only theological developments, but also the interaction of religious, political, and cultural impulses and trends. Rel 241 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

346. Women in American Religious History — An overview of the role of women in American religious history, with emphasis on contemporary issues of women in ministry and feminist theology.
4 Credits | As Needed

349. Studies in Religious History — A course designed to enable current staff or visiting faculty to teach a course in the area of their current research, and to facilitate cross-listing courses.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Global Learning Domestic (GLD)

Theological Studies Courses

362. Feminist Theology — An exploration of theological questions (who is God?, what does it mean to be human?, how do we read the Bible?, etc.) from the perspective of feminist theologians. A Rel 260-level course is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

363. Studies in Christian Spirituality — A study of major views within the Christian tradition on the nature and practice of spirituality. In addition to the Bible, the writings of such masters as Benedict of Nursia, Maximus Confessor, Bernard of Clairvaux, Julian of Norwich, John Woolman, Soren Kierkegaard, Theresa of Lisieux, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Mother Teresa will be examined.
4 Credits | As Needed

364. Philosophical Theology — A study of major issues and questions which arise in Christian philosophical theology. Topics covered include religious experience, faith and reason, arguments for God’s existence, theology and science, miracles, the problem of evil, and religious pluralism. A Rel 260-level course is highly recommended prior to this course. Cross-listed with Phil 331.
4 Credits | Spring, As Needed

365. Ecological Theology and Ethics — A study of the nature and causes of current ecological degradation, the witness of Christian scripture and tradition concerning ecological matters, the responsibilities of humans as earthkeepers, and the practical implications of living in a more earth-friendly way. This is an off-campus course combining traditional academic study with a wilderness backpacking, canoeing, and kayaking trip in which participants learn wilderness camping skills and develop their leadership ability in addition to examining issues in the area of ecological theology and ethics.
4 Credits | Summer

366. World Christianity — With over 60% of all Christians now living in the southern and eastern hemispheres, often among the poorest peoples of the world, Christianity has returned to being a predominantly non-Western faith. The total number of Christians in Africa, Asia and Latin America increases by approximately 70,000 people per day (more than 25 million per year). This course introduces students to contemporary world Christianity by gaining a theological and historical understanding of the current shape of the Christian faith around the world.
4 Credits | As Needed | Global Learning International (GLI)

367. Reformed Theology — This course represents a significant introduction to Reformed Theology. It seeks to acquaint students with the dominant characteristics of the Reformed tradition by examining “misconceptions” of what it means to be “reformed” while also providing a historically informed and theologically substantive treatment of this tradition from John Calvin’s 1559 Institutes of the Christian Religion to Bruce McCormack’s treatment of Barth’s critically-realistic-dialectical theology.
4 Credits | As Needed

369. Studies in Christian Theology — A course designed to enable current staff or visiting faculty to teach a course in the area of their current research, and to facilitate cross-listing courses.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

World Religion Courses

381. Religions of India — A study of the history and development of the major religions of India. Special attention is drawn to the impact of historical religion on modern India.
4 Credits | Fall, Even Years

383. Studies in Islam — A study of the history and development of Islam, considering its literature, doctrines, traditions, and practices. Particular emphasis is placed upon sectarian Islam with its various geographical locations and its political significance in the world today.
4 Credits | As Needed

389. Studies in World Religions — A course designed to enable current staff or visiting faculty to teach a course in the area of their current research, and to facilitate cross-listing courses.
4 Credits | As Needed | Global Learning International (GLI)

Seminar & Independent Studies

420. Seminar in Scripture — A senior level seminar course on some topic related to the study of scripture. Declared religion major or minor is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

440. Seminar in the History of Christianity — A senior level seminar course on some topic related to the study of the history of Christianity. Declared religion major or minor is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

460. Seminar in Theology and Ethics — A senior level seminar course on some topic related to the study of theology and/or religious ethics. Declared religion major or minor is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

480. Seminar in World Religions — A senior level seminar course on some topic related to the study of religions of the world.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Spring, Summer

490. Independent Studies — A program providing an opportunity for the advanced student to pursue a project of his/her own interest beyond the catalog offerings. The course can be based upon readings, creative research and/or field projects.
Prerequisites: Permission of chairperson
1-4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

498. Religion Internship I — A supervised practical experience in a church or religious organization. This experience will involve at least 12 hours per week in a setting approved by the instructor. It may be taken for one (Rel 498) or two (Rel 498 and Rel 499) semesters. Rel 220 and 1 additional Rel course are highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

499. Religion Internship II — A continuation of Rel 498. A supervised practical experience in a church or religious organization. This experience will involve at least 12 hours per week in a setting approved by the instructor. Rel 220 and one additional Rel course are highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

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