Hope College News

2017 Sep

  1. Multiple Members of Hope Community Have Work in ArtPrize Nine

    Two members of the Hope campus community and several alumni have entries in ArtPrize Nine, which is running in multiple venues in Grand Rapids from Wednesday, Sept. 20, through Sunday, Oct. 8.

    Multiple Members of Hope Community Have Work in ArtPrize Nine
  2. Music Convocation Celebrates Three “Living Legends” of the Department

    The Department of Music celebrated three “living legends” — retired faculty Joan Conway, Roger Rietberg and Dr. Robert Ritsema, who had each spent 30 years or more teaching at Hope — during the department’s annual opening convocation on Thursday, Aug. 31.

    Music Convocation Celebrates Three “Living Legends” of the Department

2017 Aug

  1. Teaching a New Dog Old Tricks

    Posted by Lindsey Engelsman

    by Dr. Kirk Brumels, professor and chair, Hope College Kinesiology Department Providing unabashed love in exchange for food and shelter, my dog Dixie’s devotion and friendship is a commonplace canine occurrence. Yet, as an English Setter from hunting bloodlines, she is genetically wired for more. So when Dixie became part of our family two years … Continue reading Teaching a New Dog Old Tricks

    Teaching a New Dog Old Tricks
  2. Religion Professor Co-Authors “From Cairo to Christ”

    Dr. Kent Van Til of the Hope College religion faculty is co-author of “From Cairo to Christ: How One Muslim’s Faith Journey Shows the Way for Others,” published this summer by IVP Books, an imprint of InterVarsity Press of Downers Grove, Illinois.

    Religion Professor Co-Authors “From Cairo to Christ”
  3. Remembering a Banner Year

    August is a time of anticipation at Hope, as new students, faculty and staff prepare to begin their time as members of the college community and returning students prepare to resume theirs.

    Remembering a Banner Year
  4. New Book Tells of the Origins of March Madness

    Long before it became a national phenomenon linked to a $11 billion television contract, obsessive office wagering and another meaning to the name “Cinderella,” the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament — more commonly dubbed March Madness — had its humble beginnings in modestly populated Midwestern gymnasiums to little fanfare and hype. Gradually big-name coaches and big-city venues, plus a big-time point-shaving scandal, enveloped the tournament, directing it toward the more prominent stage it would eventually play upon today. It’s this early roundball history, when college basketball was fresh-faced and growing, that Dr. Chad Carlson of the Hope College faculty recounts in his new book, “Making March Madness: The Early Years of the NCAA, NIT and College Basketball Championships, 1922-1951.”

    New Book Tells of the Origins of March Madness
  5. Violist Barbara Corbató to Present Faculty Recital on September 10

    Violist Barbara Corbató will present a faculty recital at Hope College on Sunday, Sept. 10, at 2 p.m. in the John and Dede Howard Recital Hall of the Jack H. Miller Center for Musical Arts.

    Violist Barbara Corbató to Present Faculty Recital on September 10
  6. New book explains the origins of March Madness

    Posted by Eva Dean Folkert

    It’s this early roundball history, when college basketball was fresh-faced and growing, that Dr. Chad Carlson recounts in his new book out today titled "Making March Madness: The Early Years of the NCAA, NIT and College Basketball Championships, 1922-1951."

    New book explains the origins of March Madness
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