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Hope College
Department of English
126 E. 10th St.
Holland, MI 49423

english@hope.edu
phone: 616.395.7620
fax: 616.395.7134

 

Fall 2014 English 113 Courses

English 113, Expository Writing I, encourages students to explore ideas through reading, discussion, and writing. The emphasis is on development of writing abilities; the area of exploration varies with individual instructors.

All English 113 sections fulfill the General Education requirement, but are not counted toward an English major. The English Department encourages each student to select the section which best meets his/her needs.

Here is the list of this semester’s variants; see below for each course description.

113.01 Natural Selections Cairn TBD
113.02 Writing and the Arts Emerson MW 8:30-10:20 AM
113.03 Rethinking Health Douglas TR 3:00-4:50 PM
113.04 Language and Meaning of Popular Music Banner TR 9:30-10:50 AM
113.05 The Will to Survive Moreau MWF 8:30-9:20 AM
113.06 The Will to Survive Moreau MWF 9:30-10:20 AM
113.07 Academic Writing Werner TR 9:30-10:50 AM
113.09 Practices in Critical Reading and Writing Gorman MWF 12:00-12:50 PM
113.10 Practices in Critical Reading and Writing Gorman MWF 1:00-1:50 PM
113.11 Natural Selections Cairn TBD
113.15 Writing Workshop 2014 Lewison TR 9:30-10:50 AM
113.16 Popular Culture Schoon-Tanis MW 12:00-1:50 PM
113.17 Who Are You? Clark TR 3:00-4:50 PM
113.18 Writing Workshop 2014 Lewison TR 1:30-2:50 PM
113.19 Crichton's Jurrasic Park Smith TR 6:30-8:20 PM

Course Descriptions

ENGL 113.01: Natural Selections
Cairn, North
TBD

Humanity’s evolving relationship to nature is one of the urgent issues of our time, shaping us and our future for generations to come. In this course, we will explore selections of nature and environmental writing (including poetry), nonfiction that deals with key challenges we face in our interdependent role in the natural world, how we balance such stresses as development vs. conservation and preservation of wilderness vs. use of natural resources, and in what ways the predominance of Homo sapiens has altered the natural world and the understanding of what it means to be human.We will examine these themes and practice various types of writing including academic, non-fiction, descriptive, scientific and others within a workshop setting. Students' work will be both peer-reviewed and evaluated by the professor.

ENGL 113.02: Writing and the Arts
Emerson, Derek
MW 8:30 AM 10:20 AM

Please contact instructor for course description.

ENGL 113.16: Popular Culture
Schoon-Tanis, Kathryn
MW 12:00 PM 1:50 PM

This course is an examination of the rhetoric and composition of popular culture. That is, in addition to being a course about academic writing, this course is a general survey of popular culture. The hope is that in studying the rhetoric and composition of popular culture, students not only will engage popular texts more critically and more fully, but also will gain greater understanding of the rhetorical and compositional needs of academic writing.

ENGL 113.05: The Will to Survive
Moreau, Bill
MWF 8:30 AM 9:20 AM

After all, isn’t that what life is all about anyway—surviving? To what extent do human beings fight to survive? To what lengths and extremes will we go to cling to life? What is the limit of our hanging on?

In this English 113 section, participants will read, discuss, and be asked to write in response to literature that exemplifies humankind’s desire to survive. To inspire our discussing and writing, we will explore three pieces of “survival” literature. Actual titles will be selected form the following works: In Harm’s Way by Doug Stanton (nonfiction), Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody (nonfiction), The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls (nonfiction), Alive by Piers Paul Read (nonfiction), A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beal (nonfiction), and/or The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (dystopian fiction).

And, speaking of survival, a major goal of this class will be to help you “survive” the writing that will be demanded of you in the real world of college and beyond; therefore, we’ll explore and practice writing that narrates, informs, persuades, reviews, responds, shares, and/or entertains.

Class time will be spent discussing the assigned literature and (to a greater extent) responding to and helping each other with the writing we create—in pairs, in small groups, and as a whole class. We will also spend time learning together through informal lectures, student presentations, in-class writing, and individual student-teacher conferences. We’ll choose from different types of writing in order to create some final products, and eventually, we’ll create a more in-depth research project.

ENGL 113.06: The Will to Survive
Moreau, Bill
MWF 9:30 AM 10:20 AM

After all, isn’t that what life is all about anyway—surviving? To what extent do human beings fight to survive? To what lengths and extremes will we go to cling to life? What is the limit of our hanging on?

In this English 113 section, participants will read, discuss, and be asked to write in response to literature that exemplifies humankind’s desire to survive. To inspire our discussing and writing, we will explore three pieces of “survival” literature. Actual titles will be selected form the following works: In Harm’s Way by Doug Stanton (nonfiction), Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody (nonfiction), The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls (nonfiction), Alive by Piers Paul Read (nonfiction), A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beal (nonfiction), and/or The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (dystopian fiction).

And, speaking of survival, a major goal of this class will be to help you “survive” the writing that will be demanded of you in the real world of college and beyond; therefore, we’ll explore and practice writing that narrates, informs, persuades, reviews, responds, shares, and/or entertains.

Class time will be spent discussing the assigned literature and (to a greater extent) responding to and helping each other with the writing we create—in pairs, in small groups, and as a whole class. We will also spend time learning together through informal lectures, student presentations, in-class writing, and individual student-teacher conferences. We’ll choose from different types of writing in order to create some final products, and eventually, we’ll create a more in-depth research project.

ENGL 113.09: Practices in Critical Reading and Writing
Gorman, Austin
MWF 12:00 PM 12:50 PM

Please contact instructor for course description.

ENGL 113.10: Practices in Critical Reading and Writing
Gorman, Austin
MWF 1:00 PM 1:50 PM

Please contact instructor for course description.

ENGL 113.11: Natural Selections
Cairn, North
TBD

Humanity’s evolving relationship to nature is one of the urgent issues of our time, shaping us and our future for generations to come. In this course, we will explore selections of nature and environmental writing (including poetry), nonfiction that deals with key challenges we face in our interdependent role in the natural world, how we balance such stresses as development vs. conservation and preservation of wilderness vs. use of natural resources, and in what ways the predominance of Homo sapiens has altered the natural world and the understanding of what it means to be human.We will examine these themes and practice various types of writing including academic, non-fiction, descriptive, scientific and others within a workshop setting. Students' work will be both peer-reviewed and evaluated by the professor.

ENGL 113.07: Academic Writing
Werner, Courtney
TR 9:30 AM 10:50 AM

The focus of every writing workshop is, of course, to help you become a more effective writer. In this writing workshop course, students will begin to become acclimated with writing for a college-educated audience. The foundations of effective writing reach all the way back to ancient civilization, where rhetoric--the art and study of argument--was first developed as a science. Effective writing is also tied to a nuanced understanding of literacy for the 21st century. In this course, students will explore effective writing through the use of rhetoric, rhetorical analysis, and multiple literacies. This is a writing workshop, which means the majority of our time will be devoted to writing activities, in-class workshops, and peer reviews. Group work will take up much of our time. Throughout the course, students will accumulate a variety of tools that can be used to strengthen their writing skills. Additionally, the course prepares students for collegiate argumentation. Students will learn to engage in intellectual arguments for different discourse communities, to utilize rhetorical principles, and to discover new elements of argumentation. This course further focuses on rhetoric—both oral and written—and is taught as a participation- and writing-heavy, collaborative workshop. Multimodal and technology-related projects will also be incorporated into various areas of the course.

ENGL 113.15: Writing Workshop 2014
Lewison, Mark
TR 9:30 AM 10:50 AM

It takes practice and it takes patience to hone writing skills. In this workshop-oriented section of English 113, we explore your interests and experiences to develop a series of essays during the term. We also use several novels and the textbook Concise Guide to Writing as a baseline for our work together. Often, you will find, the writing process is not magic, it's mechanics -- plus a dash of inspiration. With the benefit of the instructor's longtime experience as a writer and editor in the workplace, you will learn about crafting communication for today's audiences, from on paper to online, and from the academic essay to the casual-yet-concise communication of websites and blogs.

ENGL 113.18: Writing Workshop 2014
Lewison, Mark
TR 1:30 PM 2:50 PM

It takes practice and it takes patience to hone writing skills. In this workshop-oriented section of English 113, we explore your interests and experiences to develop a series of essays during the term. We also use several novels and the textbook Concise Guide to Writing as a baseline for our work together. Often, you will find, the writing process is not magic, it's mechanics -- plus a dash of inspiration. With the benefit of the instructor's longtime experience as a writer and editor in the workplace, you will learn about crafting communication for today's audiences, from on paper to online, and from the academic essay to the casual-yet-concise communication of websites and blogs.

ENGL 113.03: Rethinking Health
Douglas, Kim
TR 3:00 PM 4:50 PM

Please contact instructor for course description.

ENGL 113.17: Who Are You?
Clark, Linda
TR 3:00 PM 4:50 PM

Though forty years or more have traveled by – mostly in the fast lane – we could still say that in 2014 much insightful language we might use to describe ourselves and our life views may be expressed in song titles of The Who from the 1960’s and 1970’s. “Who Are You?” continues to have more importance than just as a “CSI” theme song, and consider “Don’t Get Fooled Again,” “How Can You Do It Alone?” “Disguises,” and “I Don’t Even Know Myself.” This expository writing course may allow you to articulate a little of who you are and what you have to say while adding to your preparation for the academic writing requirements at Hope College. Stressing the methods of the writing workshop process, our work will focus on clarity, depth of thought, voice, organization, and language effectiveness. Plan to read a variety of essay samples, write both formally and informally, engage in critical evaluation of your own products and those of others, research and cite thoroughly, and make valuable contributions within the group. Hopefully the class will help with the realization that sincere, fluent thought and writing can occur “Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere.”

ENGL 113.19: Crichton's Jurassic Park
Smith, Richard
TR 6:30 PM 8:20 PM

Please contact instructor for course description.