Education

The Department of Education prepares students to teach in elementary and secondary schools.

Hope College's Teacher Education programs are approved by the Michigan Department of Education. In addition, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) recognizes the Department of Education at Hope College as a nationally accredited program (CAEP: 1140 19th Street N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 or caepnet.org). This accreditation covers all preparation programs.

To fulfill the requirements for graduation and for certification, all teacher candidates planning on a professional teaching career must complete a major in an approved academic field, all general education requirements, and the professional education course sequence. This sequence introduces the theoretical foundations of creative and responsible teaching and simultaneously provides clinical experiences for teacher candidates to put theory into practice. Teacher candidates complete a minimum of five clinical experiences in area schools prior to student teaching. Throughout the professional sequence,  teacher candidates develop increasing competence and confidence in the professional abilities identified by education faculty. These abilities enable graduates to act as:

  • Ethical Educators
  • Skilled Communicators
  • Engaged Professionals
  • Curriculum Developers
  • Effective Instructors
  • Decision Makers
  • Reflective Practitioners

Student-led chapters of national organizations, particularly the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)  and Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) offer professional development and service opportunities for teacher candidates. Teacher candidates are also given the opportunity and encouraged to engage in research projects with professors, as well as to attend and present at state, regional and national conferences.

Graduates of Hope's education program teach in public, private, charter and parochial PK-12 schools across the country and around the world as well as early childhood centers such as Head Start. Most graduates pursue advanced studies for continuing certification and complete graduate degrees in their majors or special areas of education (such as reading, curriculum development, special education, counseling and administration).

Graduates of our education program are currently serving as:

  • Classroom teachers in rural, urban and suburban PK-12 schools
  • Special education teachers in categorical, inclusive, or resource classrooms
  • Overseas teachers
  • Peace Corps volunteers
  • Intermediate School District professionals
  • Counselors in elementary and secondary schools
  • Curriculum coordinators and supervisors
  • Administrators in school systems throughout the United States
  • College professors and administrators

Information contained in this catalog is subject to change, due to mandates by the Michigan Department of Education or the Michigan State Board of Education. Teacher candidates should consult Department of Education personnel and/or the Department of Education website to ensure that they have received updated information.

TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS :

Teacher candidates planning to teach in elementary and secondary schools must be formally admitted to the Hope College Teacher Education program. Application for admission to the Hope College Teacher Education program is made following the successful completion of the required introductory courses and clinical experiences. Michigan law, as well as some other state laws, prohibit an individual from obtaining or maintaining a valid certification if the individual has any of several listed criminal convictions. The Hope College Department of Education will evaluate criminal convictions to determine an individual’s likelihood of obtaining a teacher certificate and whether this individual will be admitted into the program. Application information and procedures can be accessed online on the  Hope College Department of Education website.

Teacher candidates are urged to plan their programs carefully and should begin that process early in their college careers. Teacher candidates are expected to meet individually with education faculty for advising. Teacher candidates typically begin the teacher education sequence with Education 200/201, Education 270, and Education 225/226 during their freshman or sophomore year and reserve at least one semester of the senior year for student teaching. Application for student teaching must be made two semesters before the student teaching semester. Information about required courses is available on the Hope College Education Department website.

All program requirements must be completed for teacher candidates to be recommended for a teaching certificate in the State of Michigan. Program requirements include:*

  • Formal admission to the Hope College Teacher Education program.
  • Satisfy the general education requirements for the B.S., B.A. or B.Mus. degree at Hope College.
  • Completion of the Professional Education Sequence which has been established.
  • Earn a C+ or better grade in each education professional sequence course in levels 1, 2 and 3 and corresponding clinical experiences.
  • Earn a GPA of at least 2.75 in each of the following areas prior to student teaching: the major course sequence, the minor course sequence, the education sequence and the cumulative GPA for all college coursework at Hope College.
  • Complete the requirements for a major and minor** approved by the Department of Education and affirmed by the Michigan Department of Education.
  • Pass the required Michigan Tests for Teacher Certification (MTTC) in appropriate areas.
  • Hold valid certification in CPR/First Aid at the time of application for Michigan teacher certification.

*State of Michigan requirements are subject to periodic change. Teacher candidates must meet State of Michigan and Department of Education requirements for teacher certification in effect at the time application is made.

**Specific requirements for all certifiable majors and minors are available on the department website.

A COMPLETED APPLICATION INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING ITEMS:

  • Completion of orientation sessions
  • Declared Education Major/Minor emailed to education@hope.edu
  • Three faculty  recommendations (one in Education Department, two other Hope professors)
  • Successful completion with a C+ or better of EDUC 200, 201, 225, 226, 270
  • Confidentiality, Criminal Background Check and Commitment to Professionalism Statements
  • Program Completion Plan (with advisor)
  • Overall GPA of 2.75 or higher

All policies that pertain to the application process to the Hope College Teacher Education program, the continuation through the course sequence, the process for assignment to a student teaching placement, and final approval for Michigan certification can be found on the department’s website under Applying to the Department. These policies and procedures are available electronically on the department’s website (www.hope.edu/academics/education/). Teacher candidates must read this information, become familiar with all expectations, deadlines and responsibilities, and comply with policies and regulations stated therein. Failure to do so may cause delays in the application process, in entry to courses in the professional sequence and to the student teaching semester.

For Fall 2021 and After

Elementary Education:

Elementary: 1) Teacher candidates select grade bands of (a) PK-3 (b) 3-6  and an endorsement area  in one of the following (a) Learning Disabilities, (b) Emotional Impairments or (c) English as a Second Language (d) Spanish K-12 or any combination there within.  Complete BIOL 102, CHEM 102, MATH 221, 223 (PK-3), 225 (3-6), 308, EDUC 200, 201, 203, 225, 226, 230, 232, 260, 270, 271, 272, 277, 280 & 281 (PK-3), 282 & 283 (3-6), & 310, 311, 312, 457, and 470.

Secondary education:

Secondary: Teacher education candidates select a content or group major and a minor. If an Emotional Impairments or Learning Disabilities major is selected at the secondary level, the candidate must declare an English or Mathematics minor (See Department of Education website for details). An endorsement in ESL can be added to any track. Complete EDUC 200, 201, 225, 226, 270, 275, 276, 285, 286, 287, 360, 361, 457, 480 or 485 and methods courses in the major and minor fields.

Special education:

The Department of Education offers majors in the areas of K-12 Emotional Impairments and K-12 Learning Disabilities. Teacher candidates follow either the Elementary or Secondary certification track. These teacher candidates must complete courses as listed for elementary or secondary as well as:

For Learning Disabilities: EDUC 200, 201, 225, 226, 251, 252, 253, 254, 270, 356, 357, 359, 434, 457, 460

For Emotional Impairment: EDUC 200, 201, 225, 226, 241, 242, 251, 252, 270, 356, 358, 363, 436, 457, 465

K-12 Teaching specialists:

In the areas of Art, Music, Kinesiology, and Spanish, Hope College offers K-12 programs for teaching specialists. Teacher candidates majoring in Art, Music, and  Kinesiology  follow the Secondary certification track. Teacher candidates majoring in Spanish K-12 choose either the Elementary or Secondary certification track. Complete EDUC 200, 201, 225, 226, 270, 275, 276, 285, 286, 287, 500, methods courses, student teaching.

English as a Second Language Endorsement:

Teacher candidates can add an ESL endorsement (K-12) to either an elementary or a secondary track. Teacher candidates wishing to add this will take the following  credits: EDUC 280, 281, 388, 390, 392, 393, ENGL 360 or 375, IDS 200, LING 364 or SPAN 462.

Student teaching and clinical placement requirements:

Teacher candidates completing requirements for a secondary teaching certificate must have clinical experiences (inclusive of student teaching) in both the major and minor areas of study and in both middle and high school.

Teacher candidates completing requirements for K-12 endorsement (special education, music, art, kinesiology and Spanish) must have clinical experiences (inclusive of student teaching) at the elementary and secondary levels.

Teacher candidates who complete requirements for an elementary teaching certificate must also have structured clinical experiences (inclusive of student teaching)  in all of the necessary elementary grade bands.

All teacher candidates must complete a minimum of three different diverse clinical experiences (inclusive of student teaching). Diverse clinical experiences are defined as a classroom with at least 20% racial diversity, at least 20% low socioeconomic diversity and inclusive of students with exceptionalities (special needs or gifted).

Student Teaching Opportunities:

In addition to a broad range of local student teaching opportunities, elementary and secondary teacher candidates may apply for off-campus student teaching through The Denver Program, The Chicago Semester Program,  Liverpool (UK),  Interaction International,  Watts in Los Angeles, and the Rosebud Indian Reservation, and various international settings (as available). The Hope College Department of Education website has updated information about off-campus student teaching opportunities.

After approval from the Hope College Department of Education, teacher candidates can fulfill their student teaching experience in  either urban, suburban or rural school districts.

MEETING PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS:

All teacher candidates in education courses must demonstrate that they have met the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC Standards), as well as the National Education Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS*T) to be designated as “highly qualified” teachers. Utilizing this past work, teacher candidates will develop their student teaching professional portfolios to demonstrate they have met these professional standards.

certification:

After successful completion of all program requirements, graduates will qualify for a teaching certificate from the State of Michigan. Although teaching requirements vary among states, the Michigan certificate-- through reciprocal certification agreements-- is valid in many other states. Teacher candidates desiring to teach outside of Michigan should confer with the Hope College Department of Education's Director of Certification for specific requirements.

FINDING A TEACHING POSITION:

Special efforts are made by the Boerigter Center for Calling and Career to help teacher candidates secure teaching positions, but the college does not guarantee the placement of graduates in positions. Credentials packets must be completed during the student teaching semester. These packets  are then managed either by the student or by a private online service.

Majors

For a complete list of education majors, see the department of education website.

Minors

For a complete list of education minors, see the department of education website.

Education

354. Observation & Assessment Practices in Early Childhood & Early Childhood Special Educ Birth-Kinder — Students will be introduced to early childhood assessment practices and appropriate assessment tools and methods for children birth through
kindergarten. Students will develop an understanding of responsible assessment and about ways to include families and other professionals in the
process. Students will enhance their understanding of the IEP/IFSP requirements and about adapting assessment strategies to be appropriate for
young children with special needs. Students will have an opportunity to review program assessment by completing a program assessment tool. Many of the assignments include a clinical experience component.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 313 and Educ 314, Psy 230
Corequisites: Educ 355
3 Credits | Once per year

355. Observation & Assessment Practices in Early Childhood & Early Child Special Educ Birth-K Clinical Ex — Students will be introduced to early childhood assessment practices and appropriate assessment tools and methods for children birth through
kindergarten. Students will develop an understanding of responsible assessment and about ways to include families and other professionals in the
process. Students will enhance their understanding of the IEP/IFSP requirements and about adapting assessment strategies to be appropriate for
young children with special needs. Students will have an opportunity to review program assessment by completing a program assessment tool. Many of the assignments include a clinical experience component.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 313 and Educ 314, Psy 230
Corequisites: Educ 354
1 Credit | Once per year

Introductory Courses

200. Encounter with Cultures for the Educator: Diversity, Inclusion & Equity — This course is one of the first courses in the education sequence and will discuss the reality of diversity in America. Through literature, films, autobiographical writings, lectures, cultural events, and tutoring of diverse students, teacher candidates will explore their heritage and experiences and those of others. Psychosocial and cognitive development theories, and environmental factors will be studied. Exploration will occur of creative classroom environments that will justly serve every student with various backgrounds. This knowledge and experience will provide a foundation for further learning in the education program.
Corequisites: Educ 201
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

201. Encounter with Cultures for the Educator: Diversity, Inclusion and Equity Field Placement — This course give hands on experiences and accompanies ED 200. Teacher candidates will work with diverse populations in a combination of tutoring and outside events.
Corequisites: Educ 200
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

220. Educational Psychology — This course focuses on the growth and development of children with special emphasis on their social, emotional, and intellectual development. Careful study of the learning process is emphasized and its implications for teaching and the classroom are examined. Students will be introduced to the department's Professional Abilities and program options.
Corequisites: Educ 221
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

221. Educational Psychology Field Placement — This clinical experience is a corequisite with Educ 220 and will provide opportunities for students to work with mentor teachers in K-12 classrooms and to interact with children in large and small groups and/or one-to-one to discover the complexities of the teaching/learning process, and to determine if teaching is a desired career choice.
Corequisites: Educ 220
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

225. The Exceptional Child and Adolescent — This course provides an introduction to categories of disabilities, the legal and historical foundations of special education, identification, and referral and IEP processes when working with individuals identified as exceptional, gifted, English Language Learners, and/or at-risk. This course addresses differentiation, including modifications, accommodations, technologies, and Universal Design for Learning. Educ 200 and Educ 201 are highly recommended prior to this course. Cross-listed with Psy 225. This may be used as an elective for the psychology major, but not the psychology minor.
Corequisites: Educ 226
3 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

226. The Exceptional Child and Adolescent Clinical Experience — This clinical experience provides opportunities for interaction with persons identified as exceptional, gifted, English Language Learners, and/or at-risk in public, charter, private schools, residential facilities, or community agencies. Teacher candidates will participate as aides, tutors, and instructors with individuals and small groups. Educ 200 and Educ 201 are highly recommended prior to this course. Cross-listed with Psy 226. This may be used as an elective for the psychology major, but not the psychology minor.
Corequisites: Educ 225
1 Credit | Fall, Spring, Summer

241. Introduction to Emotional Impairments — This course provides an introduction for teaching students with emotional/behavior impairments. Definitions and characteristics of an emotional impairment will be emphasized as well as historical, philosophical, etiological, and specific theoretical models identified regarding educating students with emotional/behavioral impairments.
Corequisites: Educ 242
3 Credits | Spring

242. Field Experience: Emotional Impairment — This clinical experience provides an opportunity for Hope students to work with individuals with emotional/behavioral impairments and observe how to service these individuals in school settings.
Corequisites: Educ 241
1 Credit | Spring

253. Introduction to Learning Disabilities — This course provides the foundation for teaching students with learning disabilities. Definitions and characteristics of a learning disability are emphasized in addition to historical perspectives and special education processes, programs and services at all levels - preschool through high school. In addition to exploring medically related issues, theoretical models and their implications for teaching students with learning disabilities are also addressed.
Corequisites: Educ 254
3 Credits | Fall

254. Field Experience: Learning Disabled — This clinical experience provides an opportunity for Hope teacher candidates to work with students with learning disabilities and observe how they are serviced in the school setting. Teacher candidates focus on experiences in a special education setting at the elementary, middle, or high school level.
Corequisites: Educ 253
1 Credit | Fall

270. Foundations of Education — This course focuses on the organizational and operational aspects of education as they relate to current critical issues, problems, and practices in PK-12 American education. Social and cultural contexts of schooling are examined by studying the topics of poverty, equity, and justice. A focus on the whole child is explored through learning centered strategies, research based best practices, high leverage practices, and equitable assessment. A primary outcome is the development of a personal educational philosophy. This course transitions from 2 to 4 credits for students entering Hope Fall 2021 or after.
Corequisites: Educ 200 and Educ 201, for students entering fall 2021 or after, Or, Educ 220 and Educ 221, for students entering prior to fall 2021, Or, Educ 225 and Educ 226
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

Professional Courses

203L. Clinical Experience for the Science Teacher Pre-K through 3rd Grade — This clinical experience provides opportunities for teacher candidates to experience assisting and teaching PK-3 students in science content.
Prerequisites: Declared education major.
1 Credit | Fall

203U. Clinical Experience for the Science Teacher 3rd through 6th Grade — This clinical experience provides opportunities for teacher candidates to experience assisting and teaching students in 3-6th grades, in Science content.
Prerequisites: Declared education major.
1 Credit | Spring

230. Science and Engineering Practices and Pedagogy for the Elementary Teacher — Science and Engineering Practices and Pedagogy for the Elementary Teacher is a half-semester course designed for those seeking Birth-3rd grade and/or 3rd-6th grade elementary certification. During the course, teacher candidates (TCs) will gain understanding of relevant professional standards set forth by the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) Standards for the Preparation of Teachers (Earl\ Childhood, Lower Elementary, and Upper Elementary) that focus on learner-centered supports, scientific sense-making, and pedagogical strategies used in the science classroom. TCs will also understand how to interpret and use the Michigan K-12 Science Standards to engage learners using three-dimensional instruction. Specifically, TCs will gain experience choosing rich scientific phenomena for instructional units as they develop understanding of the science and engineering practices and recognize cross-cutting concepts and how they apply to quality science teaching and learning. Moreover, TCs will gain experiences with MDE Core Teaching Practices including leading group discussions, explaining and modeling, and eliciting and interpreting students thinking. Finally, TCs will learn about research-based strategies involving culturally-relevant pedagogy and promoting equity in the science classroom.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Fall/Spring

232. Social Studies Content and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers PreK through 3rd Grade — This course introduces teacher candidates to the content in the Early Childhood Standards of Quality, Michigan Grade-level Content Expectations and the Sequence of Study. They will also Explore the C3 Framework Inquiry Arc. Teacher candidates will learn how to design compelling questions and rigorous lessons in the four disciplines: history, geography, economics and civics and will have the opportunity to practice the process skills in class.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

251. Assessment, Data and IEP in Special Education — This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to administer formal and informal assessments and use this data to create strength-based Individual Education Plans (IEPs). Legal issues, evidence-based practices, technical understanding of assessment, and reliability and validity concerning testing are examined. Administration of various norm-referenced, criterion-referenced, Curriculum-Based Assessments, observations and informal tests are practiced. This information will be used to develop IEPs while evaluating the effectiveness of instruction using progress-monitoring techniques. This course transitions from 2 to 4 credits for students entering Hope Fall 2019 or after.
Prerequisites: Educ 225 and Educ 226
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

252. Advanced Reading and Literacy Practices for Special Education (K-12) — This course is designed to meet the individual needs of students who are experiencing significant difficulties with reading skills in K-12 classrooms. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practices, assessment-driven instruction, and strategies that meet the unique needs of at-risk readers and students with disabilities in the K-12 setting. This course provides many opportunities for guided independent practice of skills while allowing the teacher candidate to explore and analyze the use of research-based strategies with struggling readers.
Prerequisites: Educ 200 and Educ 201, for students entering fall 2021 or after, Educ 220 and Educ 221, for students entering prior to fall 2021, Educ 225 and Educ 226
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

260. Social Studies Content and Pedagogy for Elementary Teachers 3rd through 6th grades — This course introduces students to the Sequence of Study themes and content for grades 3-6 in the Michigan Grade-level Content Expectations in each of the disciplines: history, geography, economics and civics. They will use the four dimensions of the C3 Framework Inquire Arc to plan and teach rigorous lessons. Teacher candidates will focus especially on civic participation and the high-leverage practice of leading discussions.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 232 for students entering fall 2021 or after
3 Credits | Fall, Spring | Social Science 2 (SS2)

271. Introduction to Elementary Education — This course is the first in the elementary (PK-3 and 3-6) sequence and introduces teacher candidates to foundational concepts, terms and practices of teaching, including basic lesson planning. Teacher candidates explore the following questions in this course: How do young children learn? What and how do effective elementary teachers teach? How do teachers meet the needs of all students in their classroom?
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 272
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

272. Introduction to Elementary Education Clinical Experience — This course will allow elementary track teacher candidates to be introduced to specific types of schools and joys, needs and challenges of the elementary student. This course is the clinical experience and corequisite of Educ 271.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 271
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

275. Introduction to Secondary Education & Instruction Design — In this course, teacher candidates pursuing secondary education will be introduced to the specific needs of working with adolescents and in secondary schools. Topics covered include professional standards, curriculum, assessment, lesson design, organizing for instruction, writing instructional objectives, differentiation, accommodations, using technology for teaching and learning, structures of secondary schools including models of co-teaching, and how to use data from and about students to implement effective instruction.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 220 and Educ 221, Educ 225 and Educ 226, Educ 270
Corequisites: Educ 276
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

276. Introduction to Secondary Education & Instruction Design Field Placement — This clinical experience includes coordinated field trips to a variety of local secondary schools where teacher candidates learn about the structures, missions, and curricular of a range of schools.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 220 and Educ 221, Educ 225 and Educ 226, Educ 270
Corequisites: Educ 275
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

277. Introduction to Teaching Literacy: Concepts and Processes for Elementary Classrooms — This course introduces the literacy processes and key concepts that undergird the teaching of literacy in the elementary classroom. Given that the ultimate goal of literacy is communication, it is imperative that teacher candidates understand how these processes and concepts are inherently connected and are essential to success in schooling, career, and citizenship. This introductory course will support teacher candidates in developing knowledge and skills for teaching literacy for students PK-6.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

280. Literacy I: Reading and Language Arts, Birth to Third Grade — This course is an in-depth examination of literacy instruction that builds on the foundation of Intro to Lit (EDUC 277) and begins in Pre-Kindergarten through the Third grade. All areas of language arts are explored through interactive, integrated and engaged manner to guide the prospective teacher through a current practice approach that focuses on the GELN (General Education Leadership Network) Essentials for Pre-K and K-3. Students will have multiple opportunities to practice balanced literacy approaches from in class assignments, projects and through the clinical experience. This will be accomplished through a focus on children’s literature, assessment of the learning process, writing and a focus on the big ideas of reading through a balanced literacy approach
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 277 for students entering fall 2021 or after
Corequisites: Educ 281
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

281. Literacy I: Field Placement — This coordinated, supervised clinical experience occurs in an appropriate elementary school, Pre-K through grade three.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 277 for students entering fall 2021 or after
Corequisites: Educ 280
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

282. Literacy II: Reading and the Language Arts, Grades 4-8 — This course examines important literacy education topics that equip teacher candidates with essential knowledge and skills to support upper elementary students’ literacy development. Building on the key literacy knowledge and skills learned in Intro to Literacy (ED 277) and Literacy I (ED 280), teacher candidates will learn how to assess and actually teach the knowledge and skills meeting the needs of all upper elementary students, considering each child’s experiences, strengths, needs, and interests. This course will focus on conceptualizing and designing comprehension instruction where teacher candidates can access and unlock meaning in complex texts using various comprehension strategies
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 280 and Educ 281 with a grade of C+ or better
Corequisites: Educ 283
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

283. Literacy II: Field Placement — This coordinated, supervised clinical experience occurs in an appropriate elementary or middle school setting, grades 3-6.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 280 and Educ 281
Corequisites: Educ 282
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

285. Literacy in the Content Area — This course will focus on the integration of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and graphically representing into content subjects for grades 6-12. Course topics include: disciplinary literacy practices, generic literacy skills, modeling comprehension, differentiation, ELL, diverse learners, and assessment practices.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 275 and Educ 276 with a grade of C+ or better
Corequisites: Educ 286
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

286. Literacy in the Content Area Field Placement — This coordinated, supervised clinical experience occurs in an appropriate content area middle school or high school classroom.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 275 and Educ 276
Corequisites: Educ 285
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

287. Classroom Management for Secondary Teachers — This course will examine critical dimensions of adolescent (ages 12-18) development and identify appropriate instructional structures which create effective middle and high school learning environments. Students will study, analyze, and link classroom and behavior management theories and techniques with issues of instructional design. This course is not required for Music Education majors.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 285 or Educ 360
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in Education — This course is designed to allow students at the sophomore and junior level to become involved in studies in special interest areas.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

305. Physical Geography — This course explores the basic concepts and terms related to the study of physical geography. The characteristics and uses of maps, globes, and other geographic tools and technologies are addressed. The course also identifies the characteristics of landmasses and the physical processes in their development, including the shapes and patterns on the earth’s surface, e.g., the atmosphere, the biosphere, the hydrosphere and the lithosphere.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Fall

306. Cultural Geography — This course examines the geographical and climatic factors that have influenced the social and economic development of global populations. It analyzes the relationship of humans and their environment and explores the nature and complexity of earth’s cultural mosaics. It distinguishes the patterns and networks of economic interdependence on the earth’s surface with an emphasis on world health, religions, foods, gender relationships, etc.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Fall

310. Capstone for Elementary Teachers — This is an application course where teacher candidates pull together concepts and skills learned in prior courses and practice planning and teaching with the support of faculty and peers as they moved toward more independence in student teaching. In addition to reviewing key foundational ideas and practices, this course will focus on differentiating instruction, with an emphasis on supporting ELL students, integrating curriculum and unit
planning. This course has an extensive clinical experience in which teacher candidates and faculty will be together in the field analyzing and practicing elements of effective teaching.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 282 and Educ 283 with a grade of C+ or better, Math 225 for students entering fall 2021 or after
Corequisites: Educ 311, Educ 312
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

311. Capstone Clinical Experience for Elementary Teachers — This clinical experience occurs in local elementary or middle school classrooms. Students will observe instruction, maintain classroom routines and work with individual students, small and large groups. Students are required to plan and teach at least two lessons. Recommended for the semester prior to student teaching.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 282 and Educ 283 with a grade of C+ or better, Math 225 for students entering fall 2021 or after
Corequisites: Educ 310, Educ 312
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

312. Classroom Management for the Elementary and Middle School Teacher — This course provides an overview of classroom and behavior management techniques for elementary and middle school teachers in general education settings. Course topics will include classroom organization, setting individual and group behavioral expectations, developing and implementing classroom rules and procedures, working proactively with students, and analyzing a variety of behavioral management philosophies. Special Education majors do not take Educ 312, but rather Educ 356.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 282 and Educ 282 with a grade of C+ or better
Corequisites: Educ 310, Educ 311
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

321. Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School — This course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills and theoretical considerations needed to teach social studies in the secondary classroom by providing pre-service teachers with a comprehensive overview of some of the most effective approaches to planning, implementing, managing, and assessing successful and effective learning experiences for students. Using a synthesis of the College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework, Michigan’s content expectations, and the Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, emphasis is placed on the selection and /or design of rigorous and relevant student tasks and appropriate pedagogical scaffolding to support students’ engagement in those tasks. Teacher candidates will have multiple opportunities to engage in key pedagogical practices while receiving constructive feedback from both the instructor as well as peers through an instructional coaching model.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 322
3 Credits | Fall

322. Teaching of Social Studies in the Secondary School Field Placement — This clinical experience occurs in a social studies classroom in a middle or high school.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 321
1 Credit | Fall

323. Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School — Cross-listed as Math 323. See Math 323 for more information.

324. Teaching of Mathematics in the Secondary School Field Placement — Cross-listed as Math 324. See Math 324 for more information.

331. Teaching of Science in the Secondary School — This course introduces methods of teaching science at the secondary school level. Emphasis is placed on materials and techniques for the teaching of biology, chemistry, geology, and physics. Classroom management, student diversity, at risk students, cooperative learning in the science classroom, the Michigan Curriculum Benchmarks and Content Standards, student-centered activity-based lesson plans, long-term planning, and safe laboratory practices and techniques are topics included in this course.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 332
3 Credits | Fall, Summer

332. Teaching of Science in the Secondary School Field Placement — This clinical experience occurs in a science classroom in either a middle or high school.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 331
1 Credit | Fall

333. Secondary Special Education: Transition from School to Life — This course is designed to prepare teacher candidates to understand and work with students with disabilities at the secondary level, focusing on transition from school to life. This class provides an overview of historical foundations, legal federal implementations, best practices, programming, and assessments for secondary students in special education, and using these assessments to write the Transition Individualized Education Plan for high school students in Special Education. In addition, information about agencies, self-determination, vocational and post-school planning will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Fall

356. Classroom and Behavior Management and Behavior Analysis in Special Education — This course provides an in-depth study of classroom and behavior management for both general and special education pre-service teachers. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practices that address the emotional and behavioral needs of students, including the unique needs of students with learning disabilities and emotional impairments. The course highlights the unique strategies, curriculum options, and programming possibilities available to students with and without disabilities.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
4 Credits | Spring

357. Clinical Experience for Learning Disabilities — This clinical experience provides direct teaching experience in the special education setting. Emphasis will be on the application of assessment, lesson design, classroom and behavior management, technology supports, and remediation techniques. An IEP progress report and evaluation plan will be written on a student. Teacher candidates will receive feedback on lessons, assessments, and IEP development.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Fall

358. Clinical Experience for Emotional Impairment — This placement provides an opportunity to integrate information addressed in Educ 436 and Educ 363 to special education clinical experience settings. Emphasis will be on application of assessment, lesson design, classroom and behavior management, and remediation techniques. An IEP progress report and evaluation plan will be written on a student.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Spring

359. Instructional Design Using Evidence Based Practice: Elementary Focus for Learning Disabilities — This course focuses on curricular methods, evidence-based practices, and materials appropriate for the instruction of elementary students with learning disabilities. Emphasis is on the development of programming, lesson designed on IEP goals, delivery, and evaluation within a one-to-one, small group, or large group setting. Focus areas include curriculum adaptation, technology support, co-teaching, consultation, and content area teaching strategies.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
3 Credits | Fall

360. Secondary Principles — This course is a study of secondary schools, with particular emphasis on principles and practices. The course topics include current issues, lesson and unit design, instructional strategies, assessment, technology, professionalism, educational reform, and working with adolescents.
Prerequisites: Educ 285 and Educ 286 with a grade of C+ or better
Corequisites: Educ 361
2 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

361. Secondary Principles Field Experience — A coordinated, supervised clinical experience occurs in an appropriate content area middle or high school classroom.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 285 and Educ 286
Corequisites: Educ 360
1 Credit | Fall, Spring, Summer

363. Instructional Design Using Evidence Based Practice: Elementary Focus for Emotional Impairment — This course focuses on curricular methods, evidence-based practices, and materials appropriate for the instruction of students with emotional and behavioral concerns. Emphasis is placed on the development of programming, service delivery models, lessons based on specific IEP objectives, instructional strategies, and evaluation. This course transitions from 4 to 3 credits for students entering Hope Fall 2019 or after.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
3 Credits | Spring

380. Teaching of Secondary School English — Cross-listed as Engl 380. See Engl 380 for more information.

381. Teaching of English in the Secondary Schools Field Placement — Cross-listed as Engl 381. See Engl 381 for more information.

388. Second Language Acquisition: from Theory to Practice — This course focuses on methods of teaching second and world (or foreign) languages in grades K-12. Required of those planning to teach these languages at the elementary and/or secondary levels.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 389 or Educ 392
3 Credits | Fall

389. The Teaching of Second and World Languages K-12 Field Placement — This clinical experience occurs in a foreign language classroom at the elementary and/or secondary levels. This course transitions from 1 to 2 credits for students entering Hope Fall 2019 or after.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 388
1 Credit | Fall

390. English as a Second Language Methods and Assessment — This course examines the theoretical foundation of ESL/EFT teaching, current issues in ESL/EFL, and provides a guided practical experience in teaching English as a Second Language classes at the K-12 level.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 393
3 Credits | Fall

391. Research in Educational Practices — This course affords an opportunity for a student to pursue supervised projects in educational research under the direction of an education professor. The research topics and methods are varied. Registration is restricted and requires departmental approval. Ordinarily, no student will be permitted to register for this research practicum that has not taken basic course work in the educational program.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 200 and Educ 201, for students entering fall 2021 or after, Educ 220 and Educ 221, for students entering prior to fall 2021, Educ 225 and Educ 226, Educ 270
0 Credits | Fall, Spring

392. Critical Issues in Second Language Acquisition and ESL — This course applies core insights from second language acquisition (SLA) theory to ESL contexts. The course will explore diverse pedagogical approaches to ESL in the K-12 environment in light of research-based findings in SLA.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 388
1 Credit | Fall

393. ESL Methods and Assessment Clinical Experience — This course, a required K-12 clinical experience for teacher candidates seeking the ESL endorsement, will combine both theory and practice and implement instructional approaches that support literacy and academic development of ESL learners. It will include 15 hours in an elementary ESL classroom setting and 15 hours in a secondary classroom setting.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 390
1 Credit | Fall

395. Studies in Education — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

434. Learning Disabled Secondary Instructional Design — This course provides a study of theories, programs and strategies relative to adolescence, appropriate for use with students with learning problems in the middle or high school setting. Emphasis will be placed on current pedagogical practices designed to meet the needs of secondary level students with disabilities.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 333, Educ 352, Educ 356, Educ 357 or Educ 358, Educ 359
Corequisites: Educ 453, Educ 454
3 Credits | Fall

436. Emotional Impairment Secondary Instructional Design — This course provides programs and strategies relative to adolescence students with emotional impairments in the middle or high school setting in different types of tier support settings. Emphasis will be placed on evidence-based practices, lesson design, team teaching, and social skills training. Transition, assessments, career services, and networking with agencies will be discussed.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
2 Credits | Spring

488. Cross Cultural Education — This course provides an opportunity for students to be immersed in a diverse culture while interacting with the residents of the area. They will teach in the schools or work with area agencies. Locations include the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota and Watts, Los Angeles.
4 Credits | Summer

490. Independent Studies in Education — This course is for prospective teachers who wish to do advanced study in a special interest field. Approval for study must be given by the department chairperson prior to registration.
Prerequisites: Approval of department chairperson, Declared education major
1-5 Credits | Fall, Spring

Professional Student Teaching

455. Student Teaching Seminar — The student teaching seminar is a required component of the Professional Semester experience and is taken in conjunction with student teaching. It provides an opportunity to synthesize the student teaching experience and move the student teacher toward the world of teaching at a professional level. Meeting once a week, it offers information on the certification and employment search processes, while also presenting chances to reflect on their experiences and practice. Student teachers also meet with their college supervisors in order to examine their practice in the field.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 470 or Educ 480 or Educ 485
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

457. Student Teaching Seminar — This seminar-style course is taken during student teaching and is intended to provide opportunities for teacher candidates to reflect on their emerging practice as they make connections between course content and practice in the field. Teacher candidates collaborate with peers about cases from their clinical experience classrooms, discussing instructional decision-making and managing a classroom. Teacher candidates learn about and engage stakeholders beyond the classroom to support student learning and well-being, including parents, district personnel and community agencies.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Student teaching seminar
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

460. Student Teaching, Learning Disabilities — This field-based, full-semester, clinical experience, supervised by the Department of Education, is done in cooperation with area school systems. The student teacher is placed in a program for students with learning disabilities for the purpose of making application of previously acquired knowledge and skills. Offered for 9 credits for fall, 10 credits for spring. Double Special Education majors register for 5 credits during spring only.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 455
5-10 Credits | Fall, Spring

465. Student Teaching, Emotional Impairments — This field-based, full-semester, clinical experience, supervised by the Department of Education, is done in cooperation with area school systems. The student teacher is placed in a classroom for students with emotional impairments which provides a vehicle for application of previously acquired knowledge and skills. Offered for 9 credits for fall, 10 credits for spring. Double special education majors register for 5 credits during spring only.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 455
5-10 Credits | Fall, Spring

470. Student Teaching in the 3-6 level — This-field based, full-semester, clinical experience, supervised by the Department of Education, is done in cooperation with area school systems. Students are placed in elementary or middle school classrooms for a full semester’s clinical experience in order to develop and demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to teach. Completion of content-area methods coursework and admission to the student teaching program are required. Spanish elementary majors register for 5 credits. Early childhood minors register for 6 credits. All other K-12 elementary track majors register for 10 credits.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 455 or Educ 456
5-10 Credits | Fall, Spring

475. Student Teaching in the PK-3 level — This-field based, full-semester, clinical experience, supervised by the Department of Education, is done in cooperation with area school systems. Students are placed in early childhood or early elementary for a full semester’s clinical experience in order to develop and demonstrate knowledge and skills necessary to teach. Completion of content-area methods coursework and admission to the student teaching program are required. Spanish elementary majors register for 5 credits. All other PK-3 elementary track majors register for 10 credits.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 456, Educ 470
5-10 Credits | Fall, Spring

480. Student Teaching in the Secondary School — This field based, full semester, supervised by the Department of Education, is done in cooperation with area school systems. Students are placed in classes matching their major and/or minor areas of study at the middle or high school levels for a full semester’s clinical experience.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Educ 455
10 Credits | Fall, Spring

485. Student Teaching in the Elementary and Secondary Schools (K-12) — This field based, full semester, supervised by the Department of Education, is done in cooperation with area school systems. A full semester’s clinical experience is provided at both the elementary and secondary levels, enabling students majoring in art, music, dance, kinesiology (physical education), and Spanish K-12 to obtain a K-12 endorsement. Spanish elementary majors register for 5 credits. All other secondary track majors register for 10 credits. Completion of content methods course(s) is highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Declared education major, Educ 360 and Educ 361
Corequisites: Educ 455
5-10 Credits | Fall, Spring

500. Perspectives in Education — This seminar focuses on current critical issues facing K-12 education, including school finance, legal issues, unions, and school contracts. This is an 11-week course.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
1 Credit | Fall, Spring | Social Science 1 (SS1)

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