English

The program of the Department of English is designed to meet the needs of students who want to pursue the study of English literature and students who want to develop their skills in creative or expository writing. The two strands are closely related and complement each other fully.

Literature enables readers imaginatively to enter and share the stories, feelings and experiences of other persons. It presents, with beauty and power, perennial human situations and issues – problems of identity, purpose, relationship and meaning. The study of literature helps students expand their appreciation and understanding of literary works and their knowledge of the literary world. The English major with a literature emphasis is designed for students interested in secondary teaching, graduate school in literature or careers in such fields as editing and publishing, government service, librarianship, business, law and ministry, as well as students who just love books and want to improve their skills in reading and interpretation.

The study of creative writing enables students to view writing as a process of seeing and re-seeing the world. It helps them learn to value and express their own stories, to reflect on their lives and to believe they have something of use to put into words. The English major with a creative writing emphasis is designed for students interested in graduate school in creative writing or careers in such fields as editing and publishing, government service, librarianship, business, law and ministry, as well as for students who simply enjoy writing creatively and want to develop their skills further.

While the curriculum provides majors who wish to teach or attend graduate school the specialized courses they need, it also seeks to meet the needs of all students pursuing the broad aims of a liberal education. Courses in literature and writing help develop students' abilities to read, to think and to express themselves logically, coherently and imaginatively.

Students considering a major or minor in English should take English 248 as early in their college careers as possible. English 113 or the equivalent is a prerequisite to all other writing courses.

Majors

Students considering an English major should consult with the department chairperson or another faculty member in the department before beginning to take English classes for help in deciding about the most appropriate course selections. Students preparing for careers in elementary and secondary school teaching should see the section below and consult the Department of Education website for detailed interpretation of major requirements for teacher certification.

English Major with a Creative Writing Emphasis

A minimum of 10 courses distributed as follows:

  1. ENGL 248 – Introduction to Literary Studies. Students are encouraged to take this foundational course as early in their studies as possible and certainly before they enroll in 300-level courses.
  2. ENGL 231 – Western World Lit I or ENGL 233 – Ancient Global Literature IDS 171, 173 or 175 may be substituted for ENGL 231
  3. Two four-credit literature courses numbered 270 or above, at least one in British literature and at least one in early literature British pre-1800 or American pre-1850
  4. A four-credit course in American ethnic literature (ENGL 282 – Survey of American Ethnic Literatures or a designated 37x or 495 course involving American ethnic literature).
  5. English 253. Introduction to Creative Writing (recommended) or another four-credit creative writing course at the 300 or 400 level.
  6. A four-credit creative writing course at the 200 or 300 level.
  7. A four-credit creative writing course at the 300 or 400 level in genre different from #6 for students who did not take English 253.
  8. A 400-level creative writing workshop.
  9. A culminating course to be chosen from the following: another 400-level creative writing workshop; ENGL 360 – Modern English Grammar; ENGL 480 – Introduction to Literary Theory; ENGL 495 – Advanced Studies; or an internship.

Students considering graduate study in creative writing should include English 480 – Contemporary Literary Theory among their elective courses. They should take additional upper-level literature and creative writing courses so that their majors will total at least 44 credits and should participate in the departmental honors program.

English Major with an Emphasis in Literature

A minimum of nine courses, distributed as follows:

  1. ENGL 248 – Introduction to Literary Studies. Students are encouraged to take this foundational course as early in their studies as possible and certainly before they enroll in 300-level courses.
  2. ENGL 231 – Western World Lit I or ENGL 233 – Ancient Global Lit. IDS 171, 173 or 175 may be substituted for ENGL 231 or 233.
  3. Four credits in writing courses numbered above 113 . English 253. Introduction to Creative Writing is recommended. ENGL 360 – Modern English Grammar or ENGL 375 -History of the English Language may be substituted.
  4. Six four-credit literature courses, numbered 270 and higher. At least three of these courses must be numbered 300 or higher and at least one must be at the 400 level (ENGL 480 – Introduction to Literary Theory or ENGL 495 – Advanced Studies). *In addition, these six courses must fulfill the following distribution requirements:
    • At least two of the 4-9 courses is to be in literature pre-1800 (if predominantly British, such as ENGL 270 – British Literature I, ENGL 373 – Shakespeare or a designated 37x or 495 course) or pre-1850 (if predominantly American, such as ENGL 280 – American Literature I or a designated 37x or 495 course). ENGL 375 – History of the English Language may count toward this requirement but cannot be counted toward #3 as well
    • At least one of the 4-9 courses is to be in British literature (ENGL 270 – British Literature I, ENGL 271 – British Literature II, ENGL 373 – Shakespeare or a designated 37x or 495 course)
    • At least one of the 4-9 courses is to be in American literature (ENGL 280 – American Literature I, ENGL 281 – American Literature II or a designated 37x or 495 course)
    • At least one of the 4-9 courses is to be in American ethnic literature (ENGL 282 – Survey of American Ethnic Literature or a designated 37x or 495 course)
    • ENGL 359 – Internship in English may be substituted for one of the 4-9 courses, but whenever possible it should be taken as a 10th course

Students considering graduate study in literature should include Shakespeare and History of the English Language among their elective courses. They should take additional upper-level courses so that their majors will total at least 44 credits and should participate in the departmental honors program. They should elect ENGL 480 – Contemporary Literary Theory and ENGL 495 – Advanced Studies among their courses for the major and courses in history and in ancient and modern philosophy as cognate courses.

Students considering careers in writing and editing should take ENGL 213 – Expository Writing II and ENGL 360 – Modern English Grammar and should consider doing at least one internship, either with a local employer or non-profit agency or as part of an off-campus program. They should consult the Career Development Center or Professor Cole, the department coordinator for internships, early in their college careers to begin plans for including an internship in their academic programs.

Teacher Certification

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of English offers a teaching major and minor for certification through the State of Michigan.

The English Major for Secondary Teaching

The English major for secondary teaching is a minimum of 36 hours of credit distributed as follows:

  1. ENGL 248 – Introduction to Literary Studies. Students are encouraged to take this foundational course as early in their studies as possible and certainly before they enroll in 300-level courses.
  2. ENGL 231 – Western World Literature I or ENGL 233 – Ancient Global Literature. IDS 171 – Cultural Heritage I may be substituted for ENGL 231 or 233.
  3. Three of the following five courses: ENGL 270 – British Literature I, ENGL 271 – British Literature II, ENGL 280 – American Literature I, ENGL 281 – American Literature II, ENGL 282 – Survey of American Ethnic Literature. (Either 281 or 282 may be counted toward the three, but not both).
  4. Two four-credit elective courses in literature, numbered 295 or higher. Note: At least two of 3-7 must be courses dealing primarily with literature before 1800 for British literature and before 1850 for American literature. At least two of 3-7 must be in British literature and at least two in American literature.
  5. ENGL 375 – History of the English Language or its equivalent or ENGL 360 – Modern English Grammar or LING 364
  6. A writing course numbered above 113, chosen from ENGL 213. Expository Writing II or English 253. Introduction to Creative Writing or ENGL 279 – Creative Writing for Teachers or another creative writing course.

ENGL 380 – Teaching of Secondary School English and ENGL 381 – Field Placement are required by the Department of Education for secondary certification but do not count toward the major.

Students preparing for elementary teaching should see the English Language Arts Group Major on the Department of Education website.

Minors

General English Minor

A minimum of 21 credits, consisting of: 1. 248; 2. 231 or 233 (choosing one of these is recommended). IDS 171, 173 or 175 may be substituted, with two credits counting toward English; 3. a writing course above ENGL 113; 4. 12 credits of literature courses numbered 270 or higher. For further details, consult the advisor for English minors.

Secondary Teaching Minor

A minimum of 24 credits, numbered 200 or above, distributed as follows: 1. 213, 253, 279 or 360; 2. 248; 3. 231 or 233 (recommended) - IDS 171, 173 or 175, may be substituted, with or two credits counted toward English; 4. 271; 5. 281; 6. electives in literature or writing to bring the total credits to at least 24. In addition to the 24 credit minor, ENGL 380 and 381 are required. For further details, consult the advisor for English minors.

Writing Minor

A minimum of 18 credits of courses on writing, not including ENGL 113. If arrangements are made in advance, credit toward the writing minor can also be given for internships which involve a significant amount of writing or editing and for courses in other departments which involve internship-type experience and a significant amount of writing. Students should be aware that the writing minor is not approved for teacher certification by the state. Because of the importance of directed experience in writing, students pursuing this minor are strongly encouraged to write for campus publications, assist with the visiting writers series and/or work on the staff of the Klooster Center for Excellence in Writing. Further details and advice about course selection, particularly arrangements for securing English credit for internships in other departments, may be obtained from the advisor for English minors. Courses counted toward a writing minor may not also be counted toward an English major or another English minor.

Honors Program

The departmental Honors Program is intended to challenge majors to go beyond the minimum requirements by taking extra courses, developing an individual reading program, attending department colloquiums, and thinking about literature. In addition, the Honors Program is intended to foster intellectual exchange among students and faculty. Detailed information and application forms are available from the department interim chairperson, Professor Cole. Early application, even in the freshman year, is encouraged.

Writing Courses

102. English for Non-Native Speakers II — An advanced course designed to increase a student's English proficiency in all skill areas. Sometimes required of foreign students before taking Engl 113. By placement.
4 Credits | Fall

113. Expository Writing I — A course designed to encourage students to explore ideas through reading, discussion, and writing. The emphasis is on development of writing abilities. The area of exploration varies with individual instructors. Consult department for current list. Typical topics include Questions of Identity, Critical Thinking about the Future, Crime and Punishment, Writing as Intellectual Exploration, Academic Writing, Pop Culture, Stephen King. May be repeated for additional credit, with a different subject matter. Not counted toward an English major or minor.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Expository Writing (EW)

154. Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction — An exploration of the elements of narrative technique. No prior experience in fiction writing is assumed. Investigates characterization, plot, setting, scene, detail, and point of view. This course does not count toward the English major with a creative writing emphasis.
2 Credits | Spring | The Arts II (FA2)

155. Introduction to Creative Writing: Poems — An exploration of the practice of writing poetry. No prior experience in poetry writing is assumed. Investigates a variety of approaches to the composition of a poem and such elements of poetry as image, rhythm, line, sound, pattern, and structure. This course does not count toward the English major with a creative writing emphasis.
2 Credits | Fall | The Arts II (FA2)

195. Special Topics in English — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

213. Expository Writing II — A course designed to further the student's ability to write effective expository prose. For students in any discipline.
Prerequisites: Engl 113 or equivalent
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

214. Workplace Writing — A course designed to further the student's ability to write the types of expository prose appropriate to business, business administration, and technical fields.
Prerequisites: Engl 113 or equivalent
2 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

240. Professional Writing — A course that teaches practical, applicable, real-world writing skills and forms. The course may focus on grant writing, science writing, technical writing, writing for non-profits, multimodal composing, writing for the web, blogging and digital writing, writing in the public sphere, advanced argument, rhetorical studies, literacy studies, or other composition studies, individually or in combination. Intended particularly for the general liberal arts student and/or English elective credits. May be repeated for additional credit in a different focus area.
Prerequisites: Engl 113 or equivalent
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

253. Intro to Creative Writing — An introduction to the craft of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, including reading as a writer. No prior writing experience required.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | The Arts II (FA2)

257. Creative Writing: Plays — An introduction to the art of writing for the stage. Includes work on selected special problems of the playwright: scene, dialogue, structure, and staging. Cross-listed with Thea 256.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Spring, Odd Years | The Arts II (FA2)

259. Creative Writing: Satire — An introduction to the techniques of satire. Designed to sharpen wits and writing skills, to educate and entertain, and to familiarize students with satiric masterpieces and their own potential to contribute to this humorous genre.
4 Credits | Fall, Odd Years | The Arts II (FA2)

279. Writing for Teachers — An introduction to the basic techniques of creative writing intended especially for prospective teachers. Topics include writing practice in short fiction, poetry, and nonfiction; evaluating creative writing; and pedagogical methods and curriculum development. Includes attention to the student's understanding of his or her own writing process.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | The Arts II (FA2)

293. Individual Writing Project — An independent, student-designed writing project culminating in a significant and complete body of creative or expository writing offered to students who have exhausted the regular offering of writing courses in the department. May be repeated for additional credit with a different project.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Special Topics — A topic in literature, writing, or language not covered in the regular course listings and intended particularly for the general liberal arts student. May be repeated for additional credit in a different field of study.
2-4 Credits | As needed

354. Intermediate Creative Writing: Fiction — Intensive study of and practice with the techniques of fiction. Includes extensive reading in contemporary fiction. Students revise and complete a series of short works or one longer work.
Prerequisites: Engl 253 or equivalent
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | The Arts II (FA2)

355. Intermediate Creative Writing: Poems — Intensive study of and practice with the techniques of poetry. Students write and critique poems, discuss poems in light of current issues, and practice selection and preparation of poems for publication.
Prerequisites: Engl 253 or equivalent
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | The Arts II (FA2)

356. Intermediate Creative Writing: Additional Genres — Intensive study of and practice with the techniques of a creative writing genre such as the Novel, Graphic Fiction, Translation, or Screenwriting. May be repeated for additional credit.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer As Needed | The Arts II (FA2)

358. Intermediate Creative Writing: Nonfiction — Intensive study of and practice with the techniques of the personal narrative essay. Includes attention to style, structure, audience, and critical thinking. Students complete three to four narrative essays and prepare them for publication when appropriate.
Prerequisites: Engl 253 or equivalent
4 Credits | Spring

359. Internship In English — A closely supervised practical experience in a professional setting for upper class English majors and minors. Internships may be taken by individual arrangement through the department with a local host company or agency, or as part of The Philadelphia Center, the Chicago Semester, the New York Arts or the Washington Semester programs. At the discretion of the department, up to four credits may be applied toward the student’s major or minor requirements; otherwise, the credits (up to a total of eight) will constitute elective credits beyond the minimum required for a major or minor. The general guideline for each credit is 3 hours on the job per week for a fifteen-week semester.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-8 Credits | Fall, Spring

360. Modern English Grammar — A cumulative study of the conventions governing spoken and written Standard English, designed to model creative learning strategies that are easily adaptable for future teachers, and to develop editing and writing skills in addition to mechanical competence.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

393. Individual Writing Project — An independent, student-designed writing project culminating in a significant and complete body of creative or expository writing offered to students who have exhausted the regular offering of writing courses in the department. May be repeated for additional credit with a different project.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

454. Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction — A workshop for students with demonstrated ability and commitment to the craft of writing fiction. Students write and edit three or four pieces of fiction. A revised story of publishable quality is expected by the end of the semester.
4 Credits | Spring

455. Advanced Creative Writing: Poems — A workshop for students with demonstrated ability and commitment to the craft of writing poetry. Students develop a focused project and complete a 20 to 30 page chapbook. Class sessions spent in critique and discussion of issues pertinent to each student's project.
4 Credits | Spring

493. Individual Writing Project — An independent, student-designed writing project culminating in a significant and complete body of creative or expository writing offered to students who have exhausted the regular offering of writing courses in the department. May be repeated for additional credit with a different project.
Prerequisites: Department acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

Literature Courses

231. Literature of the Western World I — Masterpieces of Western literature through the Renaissance. Meets the Cultural Heritage I requirement.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Cultural Heritage I (CH1)

232. Literature of the Western World II — Masterpieces of Western literature since the Renaissance. Meets the Cultural Heritage II requirement.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Cultural Heritage II (CH2)

233. Ancient Global Literature — Masterpieces of ancient and medieval literature, with emphasis on the epic tradition in western Europe, Africa, India, China, and the Middle East. Attention is given to the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the literary texts. Meets the Cultural Heritage I requirement.
4 Credits | Fall | Cultural Heritage I (CH1), Global Learning International (GLI)

234. Modern Global Literature — Masterpieces of literature written in English by non-British and non-US writers since 1600, with emphasis on the historical, philosophical, and cultural contexts of the literary texts. Meets the Cultural Heritage II requirement.
4 Credits | Spring | Cultural Heritage II (CH2), Global Learning International (GLI)

248. Introduction to Literary Studies — An introduction to college-level study of literature. This course explores a variety of texts from different genres. The course is designed to increase students' skill and confidence in reading literature (especially the close reading of poetry and prose), to practice the interpretation of texts through representative contemporary critical methods, and to enhance students' enjoyment of reading, discussing, and writing about literature. Open to all students. It, or an equivalent experience, is required of English majors and minors, and language arts composite majors.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

270. British Literature I — A historical and cultural study of British literature from the Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. Focuses on major works and authors (e.g., Beowulf, Chaucer, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, Milton, Behn, Swift, Pope, Johnson, Austen) and major genres, forms, and literary movements (e.g., epic, romance, sonnet, devotional poetry, drama, prose, fiction, satire).
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

271. British Literature II — A historical and cultural study of British and Commonwealth literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Focuses on major works and authors (e.g., Blake, Wordsworth, Wollstonecraft, Keats, Browning, E. Bronte, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Beckett, Lessing, Achebe, Heaney, Coetzee, Rushdie) and major genres, forms, and literary movements (e.g., poetry, drama, fiction, Romanticism, Victorian Age, Modernism, Post-Colonial Literature).
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

280. American Literature I — A historical and cultural study of American literature from colonization through the Civil War. Focuses on major works and authors (e.g., Cabeza de Vaca, Bradstreet, Wheatley, Franklin, Irving, Douglass, Poe, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, Dickinson, Stowe) and major genres, forms, and literary periods (e.g., autobiography, poetry, short stories, the Enlightenment, Transcendentalism, Sentimentalism).
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

281. American Literature II — A historical and cultural study of American literature from the Civil War to the present. Focuses on major works and authors (e.g., Twain, Chopin, S. Crane, Cather, W.C. Williams, Stevens, O’Neill, Faulkner, T. Williams, Morrison, Kingston, Brooks, Ginsberg, Rich, Erdrich, Cisneros) and major genres, forms, and literary movements (e.g., essays, poetry, short stories, Realism, Modernism, Postmodernism).
4 Credits | Fall

282. Survey of American Ethnic Literature — A historical and cultural study of African American, Asian American, Latino/Latina, and/or Native American literatures. It focuses on the evolving literary consciousness and cultural heritage of American ethnic writers, and major genres, forms, and literary movements.
4 Credits | Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD)

371. Historical Connections — An examination, using a comparative model, of how literature, over time, reflects and records intellectual, perceptual, and aesthetic changes. Recent topics include The Middle Ages and Medievalism; Arthurian Literature; Walt Whitman’s America; Jane Austen and Her World; Literature and the American Environment; Donne and Milton; Women on Trial; The House of Gothic; Medieval Romance; Old and Middle English. May be repeated for additional credit with a different topic.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

373. Literary Forms and Reformulations — An examination of how literature interrogates and revises received traditions. By focusing on sequences of works, juxtaposed works, or the works of a single author, it examines imitations, critiques, and transformations within formal literary categories and within canons. Recent topics include Shakespeare's Plays; Short Story Cycles; Exploring Graphic Novels; From Page to Screen: Contemporary Literature and Film Adaptation; The Liar in Literature; Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales; War Stories; Telling Lives – Studies in Women’s Autobiographical Prose. Literature for Children and Adolescents is offered every semester. May be repeated for additional credit with a different topic.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

375. Language, Literature, and Social/Cultural Difference — An examination of literary works as cultural artifacts, examining how they not only record and reflect the dynamics of social and cultural difference but also influence or resist change. Under investigation will be conflicts and modifications in cultural identification, how literature draws upon the lives and times of its authors, and how race, class, gender, and other forms of difference generate social and cultural tensions and express and embody them in literature. Recent topics include African Literature; Religion, Race and Gender in the Literature of Antebellum America; Asian American Literature; Romanticism and Revolution; Culture and 19th-Century American Novels; American Autobiography; Sentimental Fictions; Banned Books; Literature in an Anxious Age (1865-2003). May be repeated for additional credit with a different topic.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

480. Introduction to Literary Theory — A chronological survey of major 20th-century theoretical approaches to literature. Topics include Formalism and New Criticism, Reader-Oriented Theories, Marxism, Structuralism and Poststructuralism, Feminist, Postmodern and Postcolonialist theories. Highly recommended to students considering graduate school.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Fall

Teaching Courses

380. Teaching of Secondary School English — A study of and experience in applying methods of teaching grammar, discussion, literature, and composition in the secondary school. Required for Secondary Certification in English. Does not count toward the English major or minor.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Engl 381
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

381. Field Placement — Must be taken concurrently with Engl 380. Does not count toward the English major or minor.
Prerequisites: Declared education major
Corequisites: Engl 380
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

395. Studies in English — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

Readings And Research

290. Individual Study — An individual research project, by arrangement with a professor, investigating some topic in depth and culminating in a paper that demonstrates literary scholarship and independent thought. May be repeated for additional credit, with a different project.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

299. Readings in Literature — A tutorial arranged with a professor, often as a way to fill in gaps in knowledge of important authors and works and of major trends and patterns. May be repeated for additional credit in a different field of study.
Prerequisites: Permission of department
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

390. Individual Study — An individual research project, by arrangement with a professor, investigating some topic in depth and culminating in a paper that demonstrates literary scholarship and independent thought. May be repeated for additional credit, with a different project.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

399. Readings in Literature — A tutorial arranged with a professor, often as a way to fill in gaps in knowledge of important authors and works and of major trends and patterns. May be repeated for additional credit in a different field of study.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

490. Individual Study — An individual research project, by arrangement with a professor, investigating some topic in depth and culminating in a paper that demonstrates literary scholarship and independent thought. May be repeated for additional credit, with a different project.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Advanced Studies — A seminar in a field designated by the instructor. Preparation and presentation of research papers are central to the course.May be repeated for additional credit in a different field of study. Recent offerings include Jane Austen; James Joyce; G.B. Shaw; C.S. Lewis; Novels of the
American West; Three Southern Writers; Shakespeare's History Plays; Renaissance Poetry; Irish and Scottish Women Writers; Walt Whitman's America; Shakespeare and Marlowe. Previous work in or related to the topic of the seminar is highly recommended prior to this course; students are urged to consult the instructor if they are doubtful about the nature and quality of their previous work.
4 Credits | Spring

499. Readings in Literature — A tutorial arranged with a professor, often as a way to fill in gaps in knowledge of important authors and works and of major trends and patterns. May be repeated for additional credit in a different field of study.
Prerequisites: Departmental acceptance of application
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

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