Kinesiology

The Department of Kinesiology curriculum is designed to provide the undergraduate student with a major in physical and health education or exercise science along with a strong liberal arts background.

Graduates of the Department of Kinesiology are leading satisfying careers as:

  • Athletic trainers in colleges, high schools, sports medicine clinics, professional athletics, hospitals and industry
  • Exercise physiologists
  • Professors and coaches in colleges and universities
  • Physical therapists / Physical therapy assistants
  • Occupational therapists / Occupational therapy assistants
  • Teachers and coaches in elementary and secondary schools
  • Directors of wellness programs
  • Program directors in health facilities
  • Athletic directors
  • Personal trainers
  • Strength and conditioning coaches
  • Cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation specialists
  • Physicians
  • Physician assistants
  • Chiropractors
  • Pharmaceutical sales
  • Prosthetists/orthotists
  • Medical equipment sales
  • Childhood obesity specialists
  • Public health workers
  • Researchers

WORK/INTERNSHIP PROGRAM:

Opportunities to apply theories and principles developed in the classroom are available for all students planning to major or minor in each of the department's programs. A May Term partnership with private physical therapy clinics provides an intense 150-hour experience in all aspects of physical therapy. Other internships are also available and required. Consult the Department Chair for a copy of the program for your particular area of interest.

Majors

Students currently majoring in the Department of Kinesiology also;

  • Assist in laboratory experiences
  • Assess fitness of college students, community members and athletes
  • Assist in directing the intramural program at Hope College
  • Assist coaches in collegiate sports
  • Assist Professors as tutors in various courses
  • Assist as teaching assistants in various class offerings
  • Work as assistants to physical and occupational therapists in local schools, hospitals, and private practices
  • Serve as camp counselors in scout camps, camps for the handicapped, and church camps
  • Provide meaningful experiences for children in elementary physical education
  • Gain critical experience as athletic training students in colleges, high schools, clinics, and physician offices and during summer sports camps and professional internships
  • Coach or serve as assistant coaches in area junior and senior high schools
  • Work in corporate wellness programs
  • Teach fitness in private health clubs and school settings
  • Work in the Klooster writing center and/or with Kinesiology faculty as writing fellows

APPLICATION PROCEDURES

Major programs of study are available in two areas: health and physical education and exercise science. Physical and Health Education majors have prerequisite requirements. Consult the department chairperson as soon as possible in your college career. See the department website at www.hope.edu/academic/kinesiology.

Exercise Science

Exercise science majors must take a minimum of 38 credits within the department. Required courses are:

  • BIO 221
  • CHEM 103, or CHEM 125/127, or CHEM 131/132
  • MATH 210, or MATH 311 and 312
  • KIN 200, 202, 208, 221, 222, 223, 250, 323, 324, 383, 422, 499 or 299
  • One elective from the following list of courses:
    • KIN 209, 251, 295, 301, 308, 325, 326, 330,  342 or 371/372
Physical and Health Education

Teacher Certification

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Kinesiology Department offers a  degree in physical and health education for grades K-12 through the State of Michigan. This combined  Physical and Health Education Major certification is offered  through Hope College  education program.  It is a 45 credit major and the students need to fulfill the education department course requirements as well.  

Physical and Health Education Major

The major in Physical and Health Education consists of 45 credits. Candidates for certification in physical and health education must pass the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification in physical and health education.

Once a student has declared this as a major field of study and has been accepted into the department, they should be very intentional when scheduling courses. Some of the courses are offered every other year. Required courses in addition to Department of Education requirements are:

prerequisite course
  • GEMS 158, Human Biology in Health and Disease, 4 credits
Required courses
  • KIN 155, Lifeguarding, 2 credits
  • KIN 160, Teaching of Rhythm and Movement, 2 credits
  • KIN 200, Human Anatomy & Lab, 4 credits
  • KIN 204, Exercise Physiology for PE and Health, 4 credits
  • KIN 251, Foundations and Theory in Health and PE, 4 credits
  • KIN 301, Motor Development, 3 credits
  • KIN 330, Principles of Coaching, 3 credits
  • KIN 344, Basic Methods of Teaching PE, 3 credits
  • KIN 345, Methods in Physical Education, 2 credits
  • KIN 346, Clinical Experience in PE, 2 credits
  • KIN 350, Adapted & Therapeutic PE, 3 credits
  • KIN 352, Clinical Experience in Adaptive PE, 1, credit
  • KIN 451, Methods of Teaching Health Ed I, 4 credits
  • KIN 453, Health Ed Methods II and Sex Ed, 4 credits
  • KIN 455, Data & Assessment in PE and Health, 4 credits

Minors

Minors in kinesiology and exercise science are also offered.

Exercise Science

An exercise science minor is available at Hope College. Students desiring an exercise science minor must take a minimum of 22 credits to include 18 credits of exercise science courses in the kinesiology department and four credits from Biology 221. Required courses include:

  • BIO 221
  • KIN 200, 208, 221, 222 and 223
  • Three additional credits are required from the exercise science courses listed below:
    • KIN 301, 308, 323, 324, 325, 326, 342, 371, 383
Kinesiology

Students desiring a general minor in kinesiology must take at least 20 credits of kinesiology courses at the 200 level or above. Students desiring a general minor in kinesiology are encouraged to consult with the department chairperson to develop a course plan designed to meet their academic and career needs.

Consult the Kinesiology website, www.hope.edu/academic/kinesiology, for specific details.

Students cannot take courses for the minor on a pass/fail basis.

 

Kinesiology

101. Beginning Tennis — This course will afford students the opportunity to learn basic skills related to the game of tennis. Rules, scoring, skill development, strategy and game play will all be components of this course. Students must be physically able to fully participate in drills or activities required by the instructor.
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

112. Condition and Weight Training — This course will provide opportunity and instruction for development of physical characteristics such as strength, power, speed, endurance, balance, and agility. Students must be physically able to fully participate in the strenuous level of activities required by the instructor.
0-1 Credits | Fall, Spring

115. Dance for Sport — This course is intended to introduce students to the study movement in correlation to dance/sport skills. Throughout the course students will gain experiences of moving in and through space with emphasis on agility, balance, flexibility, transfer of weight, transitions and more. Students will use and incorporate elements of dance: time, space, energy/force to improve movement patterns in sport.
1 Credit | Fall | The Arts II (FA2)

140. Health Dynamics — This course is part of the General Education Curriculum and will establish the knowledge of diet, stress management, and exercise as they relate to fitness and health, and will provide an opportunity for the student to personally experience those relationships by putting into effect an individualized program appropriate to the student's needs and interests.
2 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Health Dynamics (HD)

155. Lifeguard Training — This course provides the student with American Red Cross certification in appropriate water safety and lifeguarding skills as needed for the Michigan Department of Education. There is a heavy emphasis on practical and water safety skills.
2 Credits | Spring

160. Teaching of Rhythm and Movement — Student will study and participate in the essential elements required for the development of rhythmic movement and competency in elementary and secondary school students. These experiences will include fundamental movement skills, rhythmic movement activities, creative dance, groove, fold, square, social and line dances.
2 Credits | Fall, Even Years

200. Human Anatomy — A course where the human body is studied from histological and gross anatomical perspectives. Laboratories include examination of human cadaver prosections, use of models and human specimens. Three lectures and one 3-hour laboratory period per week. Students also register for a Lab section. Cross-listed with Biol 222.
Prerequisites: Permission of department
4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer | Natural Science I with lab (NSL)

202. Introduction to Writing in Exercise Science — This course is an introduction to resources in exercise science and the various aspects of research within the field. The course will include learning how to use the library to acquire recent research articles, how to read the literature, as well as how to compile the literature into written reviews. The major goal of the course will be to learn how to write and cite the literature within our field. A secondary goal will be to introduce the various career options within the field.
1 Credit | Fall, Spring, Summer

204. Exercise Physiology for the Physical and Health Educator — This course is designed to specifically address issues and information related to physiology of exercise for the Physical and Health Educator. Content will cover specialized knowledge as it relates to the adolescent and pre-adolescent population, with emphasis on application principles as they relate to health, fitness, conditioning, nutrition and modifications necessary for successful instruction in K-12 school settings. Labs will focus on transitioning successful students from principles to actual application of skills.
Prerequisites: Gems 158
4 Credits | TBD

205. Safety, First Aid, and C.P.R. — This course provides the student with American Red Cross certification in First Aid: Responding to Emergencies and CPR for the Professional Rescuer. There is a heavy emphasis on "hands-on" laboratory skills.
2 Credits | As Needed

208. Introduction to Nutrition — This course is designed to develop student awareness of the nutritional implications of food choices. Students will learn the physiology of ingestion, digestion, and absorption. They will then learn how the nutrients are transported, stored, and used with the body. We will then cover the structure, function, as well as diseases involved with the over-consumption of carbohydrates, proteins and fats. Topics include the history of the current My Plate and Dietary Guidelines, The National School Lunch Program, as well as how to shop effectively in the grocery store. Each student will be required to practically apply all knowledge learned through a three day diet analysis and correction project.
3 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

209. Medical Terminology for Health Care Professionals — This basic medical terminology course will provide the framework needed before advancing to a more comprehensive pre-health professional graduate program. This course will focus on the many components of a medical term and how to break down a medical term by simply knowing the meaning of the prefix or suffix or combining form and/or word root. It is important for students to realize that accurate spelling, pronunciation, and usage of medical terms in context is of extreme importance in the care of a patient regardless of their setting in health care.
2 Credits | Spring, Summer

212. Health Advocacy and Care Coordination — This course provides an opportunity to study significant issues concerning health care aimed at developing practical approaches to supporting patients in the community. Students will identify barriers to effective health care as well as strategies for enabling at-risk patients to play a more active role in promoting their own health and well-being. Interactive and thought-provoking group discussions based on class presentations and readings will help prepare students to act as health advocates in the community. Students will learn about population medicine; specific chronic diseases in the community setting; ethical dilemmas about the uninsured and underinsured; methods of improving compliance, and measuring outcomes to name a few topics. This course is a prerequisite for KIN 214, Health Advocacy Practicum. Recommended for pre-med and pre-health science majors in their junior year. Application required.
Prerequisites: Junior standing
1 Credit | Fall

214. Health Advocacy Practicum — This course is a health advocacy practicum to provide experiences to students seeking a career in health care. Students will serve as health advocates to patients with chronic diseases within a transdisciplinary care coordination team in the community setting. As part of this course, students will provide healthcare advocacy services either face-to-face or by phone, to indentified individuals in our community under the direct supervision of a healthcare provider. Students will be responsible for their own transportation. Updated immunizations, background checks, and provider CPR certification required.
Prerequisites: Kin 212
1 Credit | Spring

221. Anatomical Kinesiology — The musculoskeletal system and its action is studied in detail, with specialized emphasis given to origin and insertion of skeletal muscles. The primary emphasis of the course is directed toward the health, fitness and medical fields. The laboratory component of the class will focus on palpation, stretching and strength exercises. Additionally, exercises to explore kinesthesis and proprioception, passive vs. active inefficiency, etc. will be covered. Three lectures and one, 1-hour lab section per week.
Prerequisites: Kin 200 or equivalent
4 Credits | Fall

222. Exercise Physiology — Introduces the specialized knowledge associated with the physiology and biochemistry of exercise and physical conditioning. Additionally, it illustrates the process of the derivation of exercise principles and the application of those principles to health, fitness and/or performance objectives.
Prerequisites: Biol 221
Corequisites: Kin 223
3 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

223. Exercise Physiology Laboratory — Laboratory experience designed to demonstrate physiological principles learned in Kin 222. Required for Kinesiology majors and minors.
Prerequisites: Biol 221
Corequisites: Kin 222
1 Credit | Fall, Spring, Summer

250. Research Methods in Kinesiology — This course is an overview of the qualitative and quantitative research approaches specific to the various disciplinary areas in kinesiology. Topics covered include the role of the researcher, research ethics; selecting and developing a research problem; reviewing the literature; developing research hypotheses; writing research proposals; issues in measurement; sources of error, data collection issues; statistical analyses and communicating the results of research.
Prerequisites: Math 210 or equivalent
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

251. Foundations and Theory in Teaching Health and Physical Education — This course is designed to provide introductory theories and philosophies of health and physical activity to Health and Physical Education students. Students will explore the collaborative relationship between health and physical education within a school and community setting with the Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child model. Topics will include basic epidemiology and behavior change theories. The required lab experience will provide students with physical and health applications in a variety of activities.
4 Credits | Fall

252. Health and Physical Education for Elementary Teachers — This course covers health and physical education concepts typically found in elementary and middle school PE/health curricula, and discusses how to teach these concepts to elementary and middle school students. Students may take Kin 140 either prior to enrollment in or concurrently with course.
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Special Topics in Kinesiology — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

297. Professional Tennis Management Practicum I — This course will provide instruction and experience in the fundamental concepts that lead to the Professional Tennis Management certification United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) and Professional Tennis Registry (PTR). Students will gain experience in the following: lesson set-up and breakdown, teaching group lessons, teaching individual lessons, coaching beginner players, and skills in the pro shop (e.g., stringing, scheduling).
Prerequisites: Permission of department
2 Credits | Summer

299. Internships in Physical Education, Exercise Science or Professional Tennis Management — This program presents opportunities for students to pursue practical work experience in their chosen field of study as it relates to their professional plans. It is expected that the student intern will be a junior or senior with a major in Kinesiology. The department expects the student to have completed coursework necessary to carry out the objectives of the internship as well as possess the habits and motivation to be of benefit to the sponsoring agency. Students pursuing the Professional Tennis Management certification through USTA or PTR will be required to sign up for this course. PTM students will be required to coordinate their own internships, with the assistance from the staff at the DeWitt Tennis Center. An application for the internship must be completed and approved the semester prior to the experience.
1-4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

301. Motor Development — The purpose of this course is to develop student awareness of how motor behavior is developed as a child grows. Special emphasis is given to the study of the acquisition of fundamental motor skills and physical growth and development across the lifespan.
3 Credits | Spring, Even Years

308. Nutrition and Athletic Performance — A study of the relationship between nutrition and physical performance. Subjects to be covered include, but are not limited to, comparison of contemporary diets for athletes; and the function of carbohydrates, fat, protein, vitamins, and minerals in relation to physical performance. Additionally, various popular ergogenic aids will be discussed.
Prerequisites: Kin 208, Kin 222 and Kin 223
3 Credits | Fall, Odd Years

323. Clinical Exercise Physiology — The purpose of this class is to familiarize the student with specialized knowledge in exercise science and its application to health and fitness. Students will understand the epidemiology and etiology of various disease states & health conditions. Further, students will understand how exercise and behavioral changes can impact disease risk. The course will also introduce an integrated approach to the assessment of physical fitness and the design of exercise programs in normal and special populations.
Prerequisites: Kin 222 and Kin 223
Corequisites: Kin 324
3 Credits | Fall, Spring

324. Clinical Exercise Physiology Laboratory — The laboratory portion of this class will expand on concepts learned in Kin 223. Aspects of fitness assessment and exercise prescription will be emphasized utilizing health as well as various special populations.
Prerequisites: Kin 222 and Kin 223
Corequisites: Kin 323
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

325. Science of Conditioning, Strength and Power — This class is designed to provide the student with specific knowledge about the development of conditioning programs as well as strength and power training programs. Additionally it will cover the adaptations that occur within the body during strenuous conditioning and resistance training, and how these adaptations relate to improved performance. The laboratory experience stresses advanced techniques of performance-based fitness assessment and prescription. It will also provide time for the student to learn advanced lifting and spotting techniques.
Prerequisites: Kin 222 and Kin 223
4 Credits | Fall, Even Years

326. Children, the Elderly, and Exercise: Fitness and Health — The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the specialized knowledge in exercise science with application to health and fitness benefits and potential risks in children and older adults. Three lectures per week.
Prerequisites: Kin 222 and Kin 223
3 Credits | Spring, Even Years

330. Principles of Coaching — This engaging course provides students with the knowledge and the essential skills to be a leader in the field of coaching. The teaching of leadership qualities, developing leaders within a team or program, motivation, time management, and overall program development are key concepts taught and essential to coaching profession. Students will be able to learn skills that are transferable to leadership roles outside of athletics as well.
3 Credits | Spring

342. Concepts of Athletic Injury Prevention, Management and Therapeutic Interventions — This course will introduce students to concepts relating to principles of athletic injury prevention, management and therapeutic interventions. Focus will be on both orthopedic and non-orthopedic conditions typically seen in an active patient population. Preventative measures, emergency
management, treatment and rehabilitation for a variety of injuries and illnesses will be discussed. Information presented in this course will build upon foundational coursework in human anatomy and physiology and be valuable for student interested in careers such as athletic training, chiropractic, human performance, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant, physical education and medicine.
Prerequisites: Kin 200, Kin 221, Kin 222 and Kin 223, Biol 221
4 Credits | Fall

344. Methods of Teaching Physical Education — This course emphasizes task analysis, lesson planning, unit planning, styles of teaching, curriculum models, and behavior management in the physical education setting.
3 Credits | Spring, Even Years

345. Methods in Physical Education — This course is taken after KIN 344, Basic Methods of Teaching, and applies the principles learned and mastered in that course to the situations encountered in a K-8 school setting. Prior to Fall 2019, students should follow requirements in their entry catalog.
2 Credits | Fall, Odd Years

346. Clinical Experiences in Physical Education — The clinical experience in physical education will be a hands-on educational experience in a K-8 building with Holland Public Schools. Students will attend 21 hours throughout the semester. Each student will develop and teach a minimum of 3 lessons.
2 Credits | Fall, Odd Years

350. Adapted and Therapeutic Physical Education — A course designed to introduce students to methods of teaching children with disabilities. The laws and issues regarding individualizing the educational process in physical education are examined. Practical application is included in an adapted physical education lab setting one hour each week. This course transitions from 4 to 3 credits for students entering Hope Fall 2019 or after.
Corequisites: Kin 352
3 Credits | Fall, Even Years

352. Clinical Experiences in Adaptive Physical Education — The clinical experience in adapted physical education (not adaptive) is designed to give a hands-on educational experience teaching physical education content to students with disabilities.
Corequisites: Kin 350
1 Credit | Fall, Even Years

371. Sport Performance Psychology — The purpose of this course is to gain an understanding of the relationship of human behavior to sport and how sport influences human behavior. Emphasis is given to the theory, research and application in the area of sport psychology. Must be taken concurrently with KIN 371 lab.
Corequisites: Kin 372
3 Credits | Spring

372. Sport Performance Psychology Laboratory — The objective of this course is for the student to practice and learn the psychological skills of arousal regulation, confidence, focus, imagery, flexible thinking and goal setting. Utilizing assessments, instructor-led discussion/training, partner accountability, and various drills, students will gain a better understanding of the mind's influence on performance and how to better control cognitive processing to improve results. We will also explore concepts such as flow, vision training, personality and burnout. Must be taken concurrently with KIN 371.
Corequisites: Kin 371
1 Credit | Spring

383. Biomechanics — Initially, basic biomechanical principles underlying efficient movement are explored and applied to fundamental physical skills and sport. The second part of the semester is focused on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal injury. Knowledge of physics will make the course more meaningful, but it is not required. Use of mathematical formulae is limited. The laboratory component of the class focuses on practical applications of the material covered in class, including simple machines as applied to the human body. Material mechanics including forces, collisions, bending and rupture of tissue. Center of gravity will be estimated by different formulae, and gait will be explored during both walking and running. Three lectures and one, 1-hour lab section per week. Students must register for laboratory.
Prerequisites: Kin 221
4 Credits | Spring

395. Special Topics in Kinesiology — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

397. Professional Tennis Management Practicum II — This course will provide instruction and experience in the advanced concepts that lead to the Professional Tennis Management certification United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) and Professional Tennis Registry (PTR). Students will gain experience in the following: leading group lessons, coaching USTA travel teams, coaching intermediate and advanced players, designing and conducting youth tournaments, facility management, and legal and ethical behavior.
Prerequisites: Kin 297, Permission of department
2 Credits | Summer

422. Regulation of Human Metabolism — This course focuses on the underlying metabolic events that occur in association with exercise. Skeletal muscle metabolism and substrate delivery are discussed with respect to the intracellular biochemical events involved in regulation of the energy provision pathways. Advanced level. Students must register for an accompanying lab section where group research projects with human participants are designed and carried out.
Prerequisites: Kin 222 and Kin 223, Kin 250, Chem 103 or equivalent
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

451. Methods of Teaching Health Education I — This lecture/lab course is designed to help health education minors develop competencies in planning and implementing health instruction and related learning opportunities. Attention focuses on developing the following skills: designing grade-level programs; preparing lesson plans and materials utilizing existing resources; applying primary teaching strategies used in health education; and delivering lessons that synthesize student outcomes, specific content, teaching strategies, student activities, and materials for all student abilities. This course also includes a school-based practicum.
4 Credits | Fall

453. Health Education Methods II & Sexuality Education — This course provides continued development, methodology, management, administrative, and instructional skills needed to plan and implement a health education program within a school setting. Teacher candidates will begin to explore how to teach sexuality education. Different topics related to sexuality will be discussed by teacher candidates in reflective writing. Students will enhance their understanding of human sexuality with knowledge and skills that will enable them to plan, implement, and evaluate developmentally appropriate instruction related to sexuality education. A capstone experience with a certified health educator will allow students to actively teach health.
Prerequisites: Kin 451
4 Credits | Spring

455. Data and Assessment in Physical Education and Health — This course provides a forum for developing measurement and evaluation skills relevant to physical and health education in schools and community health. Students will develop competencies related to needs assessment and data collection, evaluation, and presentation, which are aligned with current best practice and available resources. Students will implement appropriate assessments to guide decision-making related to instruction and learning.
Prerequisites: Kin 351
4 Credits | Spring, Odd Years

490. Independent Study — This course provides opportunity for the pursuit of an independent research study or in-depth reading project in a specific area of interest. Experience in a research methods course is highly recommended.
1-3 Credits | Fall, Spring

499. Special Studies in Exercise Science or Athletic Training — This class is designed to give senior exercise science students an opportunity to pursue a topic of their choosing in a supervised setting. The project may take one of two forms: 1) laboratory research, or 2) a scholarly project using the library. In both cases a thorough literature review will be required.
Prerequisites: Kin 222 and Kin 223, Kin 250
1-3 Credits | Fall, Spring

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