Modern & Classical Languages

The Department of Modern and Classical Languages seeks to provide undergraduate students communicative competence in a second language, greater understanding of and appreciation for other cultures, insight into the human experience of other peoples, intellectual development through enhanced cognitive and analytical skills, and the integration of these experiences with liberal arts into a world view which encompasses the historic Christian faith.

Instruction is offered in Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Japanese, Latin, Russian and Spanish. Some courses are designed primarily to increase fluency in speaking, reading and writing, and understanding speakers of the second language. Others stress the patterns of life and thought and the great works of literature written in that language.

Since appreciation of other cultures and fluency in the use of another language is greatly enhanced by maximum immersion in the culture and constant challenge to use the language, the department offers many opportunities in which language students may participate:

  • Apprentice teachers in beginning language program
  • Language clubs
  • The presence of native speaking assistants in French, German, Japanese, Spanish 
  • French and Spanish language houses in which native speaking students provide conversational leadership and tutoring
  • Co-curricular activities, such as, foreign films, lectures and field trips
  • Semester or year abroad or summer programs, in target language countries
  • Tutoring opportunities at the college and in the community of Holland
  • Practical experience through local or international internships

All departmental faculty have traveled and studied abroad. Fourteen are natives of countries other than the United States.

Alumni of Hope have integrated their foreign language major or minor into a great variety of careers in business, communications, health care, journalism, international studies and international affairs.

GENERAL EDUCATION

All French, German and Spanish courses fulfilling the language component of the Cultural History and Language Requirement are based upon an oral proficiency approach which combines classes taught by the faculty with review and reinforcement sessions conducted by undergraduate apprentice teachers.

The course offerings can be found under the Course Tab.

  • Classics (Classical Studies, Biblical Hebrew, Greek and Latin)
  • Arabic
  • Chinese
  • Dutch
  • Education
  • English As a Foreign Language
  • French
  • German
  • Japanese
  • Linguistics
  • Russian
  • Spanish

The descriptions of major and academic minor programs follow under these headings:

  • Chinese
  • Classics (Classical Studies, Greek and Latin)
  • French
  • German
  • Japanese
  • Spanish

When you study abroad, a number of core classes you can take in an overseas program may count for both the language major and minor and the general education requirements at Hope. Students are encouraged to take IDS 171 (CH1) or IDS 172 (CH2) at Hope. Many courses offered abroad can help fulfill the Cultural Heritage requirement, especially the CH2 requirement. Students should discuss study abroad courses with their faculty advisor prior to registration in order to discern which  Hope requirement(s) the course(s) will fulfill.

Majors

The department offers major programs in Classics (Classical Studies, Greek and Latin), French, German, Japanese Studies Composite and Spanish. The major programs are designed to meet the needs of students with a wide variety of career interests. 

Classical Studies

In the college curriculum, “Classics” primarily refers to the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean, with special focus on Greece and Rome. Classicists are interested in how the peoples of these cultures and civilizations have inspired traditions that have shaped the world from the medieval cultures of Christian Europe and the Islamic Middle East to today’s America.

The Greeks give us Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, political ideas of freedom and democracy, the beautiful poetry of the tragic hero, intellectual foundations of science and philosophy, and some of the most striking art and architecture the world has ever seen. The Romans give us the political development of republican thinking and practice, technological developments, terrific comedies, stoic philosophy and an extraordinary empire within which Christianity had its origins.

Classics is a multidisciplinary enterprise. Language study is necessary to help us think like a Roman or a Greek, but work in Classics involves attention to many fields – history, philosophy, religion, art and theatre among them. Since the classical Mediterranean world included lands on three continents (Africa, Asia, Europe), Classics is very much a multicultural endeavor.

A few Classics majors go on to careers as high school Latin teachers or college professors of Classics. Most majors and minors, however, regard Classics as a way to acquire a well-rounded education and a lifelong ability to see beyond the busy surface of the world around us. Law, ministry and medicine are common professions of our graduates, but others do everything from Bible translation to work in the banking industry.

Courses in Latin and Greek are available every semester, and the department also offers courses in Hebrew regularly. 

MAJOR IN CLASSICAL STUDIES:

Students select courses based on their own interests and in accord with these general guidelines:

  • 12 credits in an ancient language. At least 4 credits of these must be completed on-campus.
  • 12 credits in Classics courses or more ancient language(s).
  • 8 credits in courses focused on the ancient world. On-campus options include:
    • English 231
    • History 130
    • Philosophy 230
    • Political Science 341
    • Theatre 301
    • Many offerings in the IDS 170s (Cultural Heritage I) such as, IDS 175 – Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey or IDS 171 – Tragedy, Comedy, Democracy.

TOTAL: 32 credits.

German

  • The German major is an integrated program of language and culture designed for students pursuing German for professional or personal interests. Course topics vary each year, but include contemporary German culture, German film, the development of German through history, literature, pronunciation, German for economics, and others.
  • The major consists of 32 credits of German courses. these must include:
    • German 201 and 202 (or equivalent by examination or transfer, 8 credits)
    • 24 credits in German courses numbered 280 or higher

 

German Education

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers a teaching major in German for certification through the State of Michigan. Students planning to teach a foreign language at the secondary level must meet all requirements of the Education Department upon being formally admitted to the Teacher Education program in addition to those of the language department (see the Education Department and Modern and Classical Languages websites).

Requirements for the 32 hour German teaching major are:

  • 28 credits in German at the 300-level and above (see major requirements).
  • 4 credits of Linguistics (LING 364).
  • 4 credits of Teaching World Languages K-12 (EDUC 388/389). This course is considered pedagogy and is not part of the 32 hour major.

Teacher candidates are required to spend at least one semester in a German-speaking country. They are also required to pass an oral proficiency exam at the advanced low level prior to graduation, which they are advised to take directly after returning from their study abroad semester

Global French Studies

A major program designed for the student who wishes to acquire a thorough linguistic preparation combined with an extensive background in French and Francophone cultures, societies and literatures.  Linguistic proficiency and cultural competency are essential to this program for they will prepare the student for employment in which linguistic skills and cultural knowledge are necessary, for secondary level teaching, or for advanced studies at the graduate level.

The Global French Studies Major consists of a minimum of 28 credits of courses numbered 280 or higher. The major must include a minimum of two 400-level class seminars. Students who study in France or in a Francophone country for one semester should plan on taking two 300-level classes before leaving and two 400-level class seminars upon their return. Students who study in France or in a Francophone country for two semesters may take only one 400-level class seminar upon their return and be excused from the second 400-level class seminar. These students still need to complete a total of 28 credits of courses. A maximum of 12 credits in French from off-campus study may be applied toward the major.

Students wishing to pursue graduate level study in French literature are advised to take French 493, or English 480 – Introduction to Literary Theory, during their senior year. 

FRENCH HONORS PROGRAM

The French Honors Program challenges majors to attain a wider knowledge and a deeper understanding than is required for the major; in terms of reading, writing and thinking about French and francophone culture, history, literature and the arts. In the French Honors Program, students will:

  • Select and discuss supplementary reading materials with the faculty member in whose courses they are registered
  • Research and write more extensive papers
  • Attend the French Cultural Studies Colloquium presentations and participate in the French co-curricular program

Information and application forms are available on Hope’s French website.

French Education

TEACHER CERTIFICATION: In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers a teaching major and minor in French for certification through the State of Michigan. Students planning to teach a foreign language at the secondary level must meet all requirements of the Education Department upon being formally admitted to the Teacher Education program in addition to those of the language department (see the Education Department and Modern and Classical Languages websites).

Requirements for the 32 hour French teaching major are:

  • 28 credits in French numbered 311 and above (see major requirements).
  • 4 credits of Linguistics (LING 364).
  • 4 credits of Teaching World Languages K-12 (EDUC 388/389). This course is considered pedagogy and is not part of the 32 hour major.

Teacher candidates are required to spend at least one semester in a French-speaking country. They are also required to pass an oral proficiency exam at the advanced low level prior to graduation, which they are advised to take directly after returning from their study abroad semester.

Second majors that complement the French major and can be combined with a study-abroad experience:

  • Computer Science
  • Dance – Courses taught through IES Paris include dance choreography, criticism, history, anthropology, writing and/or working for an international dance company.
  • Engineering – Courses taught through IES Nantes include coursework in global engineering.
  • History – Courses taught through IES Paris, IES Nantes or CIEE Rennes include coursework focused on French History. Courses taught through SIT Dakar include coursework focused on Francophone Studies
  • Art History - Courses taught through IES Paris, IES Nantes, CIEE Rennes, or SIT Dakar prepare a student for graduate work in art history, art gallery and museum work, publishing and teaching.
  • Communication – Courses taught through IES or CIEE Paris or Rennes prepare students for a variety of fields including journalism, politics, business, and teaching.
  • Management – Courses taught through IES Paris, Nantes or Nice offer management courses and internships.

Japanese Studies Composite

Students may also pursue a Japanese Studies Composite Major by combining courses taken at Hope with a variety of off-campus study opportunities. Such a major would be an integrated program of language and culture leading to fluency in the language, a high level of understanding of and experience in Japanese culture, as well as a specialized field of study of the student's own choosing.

This major will permit the student to prepare for forms of employment in which a knowledge of Japanese and familiarity with Asian is required.

The Japanese Composite Major consists of a minimum of 36 credits of work divided between:

  • Japanese language study, a minimum of 24 credits
  • Courses from the Departments of History, Philosophy, Political Science and Religion
  • May Term in Japan program, minimum of 8 credits, which are currently taught on a regular basis. Among recommended courses are:
    • HIST 295 – Japanese History and Culture
    • POL 303 – Asian Politics
    • Special courses taught by the Meiji Gakuin exchange professor.
  • A maximum of 16 credits in Japanese with a grade of C+ or better from off-campus study may be applied to the major, with prior approval by the Japanese section head.

Latin Education

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers a teaching major in Latin for certification through the State of Michigan. Students planning to teach a foreign language at the secondary level must meet all requirements of Education Department upon being formally admitted to the Teacher Education program in addition to those of the language department. See the Education Department and Modern and Classical Languages websites.

Requirements for the 30 hour Latin teaching major are:

  • 26 credits in Latin at the 300-level or above, see major requirements.
  • 4 credits of LING 364 – Linguistics.
  • 4 credits of Teaching World Languages K-12 (EDUC 388/389). This course is considered pedagogy and is not part of the 30 hour major

Spanish

This major program is designed for the student who wishes to acquire a thorough linguistic preparation combined with an extensive background in Hispanic literature and culture. This major will permit the student to prepare for advanced literary studies, for secondary level teaching, or for other forms of employment in which a knowledge of Spanish and familiarity with Hispanic culture are required.

The Spanish Major consists of 32 credits of courses numbered 321 or higher and must include:

  • Spanish 321, 322, 341, either 342 or 344
  • Two 400-level courses, one of which must be a literature course, normally 441, 443, or 494
  • Eight credits of electives

Students who study in a Spanish-speaking country must take one 400-level course upon their return. A maximum of 12 credits in Spanish with a grade of C+ or better from off-campus study may be applied to the major, with previous approval by the Spanish section head.

Spanish Education

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers a teaching major in Spanish for certification through the State of Michigan. Students planning to teach Spanish at the secondary level only or in grades K-12 must meet all requirements of the Education Department upon being formally admitted to the Teacher Education program in addition to those of the language department. See the Education Department and Modern and Classical Languages websites.

Requirements for the Spanish teaching major are:

  • 32 credits in Spanish at the 300-level or above, see major requirements.
  • 4 credits of Teaching World Languages K-12 (EDUC 388/389). This course is considered pedagogy and is not part of the 32 hour major.

Teacher candidates are required to spend at least one semester in a Spanish-speaking country. They are also required to pass an oral proficiency exam at the advanced low level prior to graduation, which they are advised to take directly after returning from their study abroad semester.

Minors

The department offers  academic minors in Classics (Classical Studies, Greek and Latin), Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish.

Chinese Minor

The Chinese minor at Hope consists of a minimum of 20 credits numbered 200 or higher. Of these, 4 credits must be a language course numbered 300 or higher; 4 credits must be either another language course numbered 300 or higher or Chinese 295. The additional 4 credits may be completed by selecting one class from the listing below:

  • Philosophy 242 (The Philosophies of China and Japan​)
  • History 270 (Modern China)
  • History 371 (Paris and Shanghai)
  • History ​295 (Disabilities and Medicine in Global History) taught spring 2017
  • Pol. Sci 303 (Asian Politics)

​Students who seek to complete their minor abroad should plan on taking one 300-level course before leaving and must ​select their courses in consultation with the Chinese faculty and the approval of the department chairperson​. ​

Classical Studies

Students select courses based on their own interests and in accord with these general guidelines:

  • 8 credits in an ancient language.
  • 12 credits in Classics courses or more ancient language(s).

TOTAL: 20 credits.

French Education

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers a teaching minor in French for certification through the State of Michigan. Students planning to teach a foreign language at the secondary level must meet all requirements of the Education Department upon being formally admitted to the Teacher Education program in addition to those of the language department (see the Education Department and Modern and Classical Languages websites).

Requirements for the 20 hour French teaching minor are:

  • 16 hours in French numbered 311 and above (see major requirements).
  • 4 credits of Linguistics (LING 364).
  • 4 credits of Teaching World Languages K-12 (EDUC 388/389). This course is considered pedagogy and is not part of the 20 hour minor.

Teacher candidates are required to pass an oral proficiency exam at the advanced low level prior to graduation. Study abroad for a minimum of eight weeks in a French-speaking country is strongly recommended to enhance the teacher candidate’s fluency in the language as well as further his/her chances of successfully passing the oral proficiency exam. If French education minors choose to study abroad, they are advised to take the oral proficiency exam directly after returning from their study abroad experience.

French-Speaking Culture and Society

The minor has two options:

  1. Global French Studies
  2. French-Arabic Studies

In Option I, the student completes a minimum of 28 credits. Of those credits, 12 must be numbered 280 or higher. The student may opt for a 4 credit May-June Internship at the Nibakure Children’s Village in Rwanda which may replace one 300 level course.

In Option II, French-Arabic Studies, the student completes a minimum of 28 credits. Of these credits, 24 must consist of FRE 101, 102, 201, 250, 343 or 344 and one 300-level course abroad, or 343 and 344; 4 credits must consist of a minimum of one course of Arabic 101.

In addition to on-campus courses in French and Arabic, students interested in Option II should plan for a semester in Morocco or in Tunisia. These programs, administered by the Institute for the International Education of Students (IES) and the Council for International Educational Exchange (CIEE) in Rabat and the School for International Training (SIT) in Tunis, will prepare a student for a variety of fields including International Law, Politics, Journalism, The Foreign Service, Business, Market Research Analysis, Teaching at the High School and College Levels, and Humanitarian Outreach Organizations (NGO). The programs offer the following special features:

  • Courses in French, English and Arabic Immersion at the IES, CIEE, and SIT centers in Rabat and Tunis
  • French courses at the local universities
  • Housing in local homes as well as independent housing
  • Field trips connected with the IES, CIEE and SIT programs
  • Internships

German

A minor consists of a minimum of 28 credits, of which 12 must be numbered 280 or higher. Minors are strongly encouraged to complement their German minor with courses from other departments. Among recommended courses are: Economics 402; Education 305 and 384; History 131 and 240; Philosophy 373; Theatre 304.

Japanese

A Japanese minor consists of a minimum of 24 credits taken at the college level and approved by the chairperson. Of these, eight must be in courses numbered 280 or higher and up to eight may be taken in a department other than Modern and Classical Languages, e.g., History, Philosophy, Political Science, Religion or other disciplines.

A typical pattern of courses might be: Japanese 101, 102, 201, 202, 301 and/or IDS 280 – May Term in Japan program.

Majors and minors are strongly encouraged to complement their Japanese major/minor with courses from other departments.

Latin Education

TEACHER CERTIFICATION

In partnership with the Hope College Department of Education, the Department of Modern and Classical Languages offers a teaching minor in Latin for certification through the State of Michigan. Students planning to teach a foreign language at the secondary level must meet all requirements of Education Department upon being formally admitted to the Teacher Education program in addition to those of the language department. See the Education Department and Modern and Classical Languages websites.

Requirements for the 20 hour Latin teaching minor are:

  • 16 credits in Latin at the 300-level or above
  • 4 credits of LING 364 – Linguistics
  • 4 credits of Teaching World Languages K-12 (EDUC 388/389). This course is considered pedagogy and is not part of the 20 hour minor.

Spanish

The non-teaching Spanish Minor consists of 20 credits of courses numbered 321 or higher and must include Spanish 321, 322, 341 and eight credits of electives at the 300 or 400 level.

Classical Studies Courses

210. The Greek World — This course surveys the major historical developments and literary figures of Greece from preclassical times to the end of the Hellenistic period. Cross-listed with Hist 210.
4 Credits | Fall, Even Years

215. The Roman World — This course surveys major historical developments and literary figures from the foundation of the Roman Empire to the fall of the Empire. Cross-listed with Hist 315.
4 Credits | Fall, Odd Years

250. Classical Mythology — This course introduces students to the sacred tales of the Greeks and Romans through ancient art and literature. Much attention is also given to the afterlife of the myths in the postclassical world, from Renaissance painting to the cinema. Cross-listed with IDS 175.
4 Credits | Spring

280. Practicum in Classics — Practical experience in various contexts such as teaching Classics at the elementary level. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

285. Women in Antiquity — This course surveys the status and accomplishments of women in the ancient Mediterranean world, from Egypt to the fall of the Roman Empire. It examines questions of matriarchy, marriage patterns, and attitudes toward women displayed in literature and art. Attention is given to problems of methodology and modern interpretations of ancient sources on this subject. Cross-listed with Hist 285.
4 Credits | Spring, Odd Years | Global Learning International (GLI)

295. Studies in Classical Literatures and Cultures — This course is designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Studies in Classical Literatures and Cultures — This course is designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

499. Internship in Classics — This course provides supervised practical experience in anthropology, archeology, paleography, numismatics and epigraphy. Normally junior status and the completion of at least a Classics minor are prerequisites. Although ordinarily taken in conjunction with an existing off-campus program, students working together with faculty may make individual arrangements with a local host institution or organization. Following consultation with the off-campus coordinator, each applicant for this internship is required to submit a proposal describing in detail the program to be pursued, including the materials which will be submitted; a time schedule for submitting evidence; and the criteria for performance evaluation. If possible, proposals should be finalized prior to the semester in which the internship will occur. The number of credits to be determined in consultation with instructor and chairperson. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

Classical Languages Courses

171. Ancient/Biblical Greek I — An introduction to the language spoken and written first in the ancient Greek world and later throughout the eastern Roman Empire. Students learn the elements of Greek grammar and vocabulary that are found in authors from Homer to the New Testament, with special emphasis on the latter. For students with no previous study of Greek.
4 Credits | Fall

172. Ancient/Biblical Greek II — A continuation of Grk 171. Grk 171 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

271. Greek III — A continuation of Grk 171 and Grk 172, with reinforcement of grammar and vocabulary. Selected readings from the Gospels and a number of Classical authors. Grk 172 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

280. Practicum in Greek — Practical experience in the language in various contexts such as teaching Greek at the elementary level. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in Greek — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

371. Greek Prose — A course which focuses on reading and interpreting literary prose texts. Representative topics include Herodotus on the Persian Wars, some dramatic Athenian court cases, Thucydides’ observations on the causes and course of the great war between Athens and Sparta, and Plato’s perceptions on the life and teachings of Socrates. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

372. Greek Poetry — The great works of Greek verse are the subject of this course. Representative topics include the heroes, gods and goddesses of Homer’s epics, the tragic dramas of Sophocles and Euripides, and the sometimes very personal musings of the Lyric poets. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

373. Koine Greek — A study of the Greek literature which flowers in the post-Classical era. Representative works include passages from the Septuagint, some apocryphal books, Josephus, writings of the Church Fathers, and especially the New Testament. May be repeated for additional credit with a different topic.
2 Credits | As Needed

490. Special Authors — Material covered to vary, depending upon the needs and desires of those who elect the course. Grk 271 is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Studies in Greek Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

171. Latin I — An introduction to the language of the ancient Romans. After the fall of Rome, Latin remained the language of the liberal arts; until far into the modern era, the sounds of Latin were heard in every classroom, in every subject from biology to religion. This course places us in the shoes of centuries of college students, as the active use of Latin in the classroom helps us understand the ancient Roman world – as well as our own.
4 Credits | Fall

172. Latin II — A continuation of Latn 171. Latn 171 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

271. Latin III — Basic Latin grammar and vocabulary are systematically reviewed as students are introduced to the writings of some selected authors, representing the range of literature composed in Latin from antiquity to the modern world. Latn 172 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

280. Practicum in Latin — Practical experience in the language in various contexts such as teaching Latin at the elementary level. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit.
1-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

371. Latin Prose — A course which focuses on reading and interpreting literary prose texts. Representative topics include the speeches Cicero delivered against Catiline, Sallust's essays on the corruption of the Republic, and life in Nero's Rome, whether seen through the eyes of the historian Tacitus, or in the pages of Latin’s oldest novel. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
2 Credits | As Needed | Second Language (FL2)

372. Latin Poetry — Masterworks of Latin verse are the subject of this course. Representative topics include the comic plays of Plautus, Roman love poetry, Virgil's Aeneid (perhaps the most influential book, after the Bible, of Western civilization), and the tragedies of Seneca. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
2 Credits | As Needed | Second Language (FL2)

373. Medieval and Neo-Latin — A look to the literature written in Latin since late antiquity. Representative topics include Jerome's translation of the Bible, tales from medieval Ireland, John Calvin's Institutio, African Voices (Latin poetry composed by ex-slaves), and contemporary Latin. Since the topic will vary each time the course is offered in a four-year period, this course may be repeated.
2 Credits | As Needed

490. Special Authors — Material covered to vary, depending on the needs and desires of those who elect the course.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Studies in Latin Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

Modern Languages Courses

101. Arabic I — This introductory language course develops reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills in Arabic. The course includes technology such as DVD materials for listening comprehension, companion website for video and audio drills, and stresses communication in formal (written) and spoken (colloquial) Arabic. Students will be able to communicate with beginning skills to native Arabic speakers. Students meet three times per week with the instructor and once a week in Drill class.
4 Credits | Fall

102. Arabic II — This course further develops reading, speaking, listening, writing, and cultural skills with added emphasis on the meaning of phrases, sentences, short readings, and compositions. The course includes DVD materials, companion website, and stresses communication skills in formal and spoken Arabic. Students will reinforce their reading, comprehension, speaking, and writing skills with greater accuracy. Students meet three times per week with the instructor, and once a week in Drill class. Arab 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

295. Studies in Arabic — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

395. Studies in Arabic — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

101. Chinese I — A course for beginners of Chinese. The primary goal of this course is to acquire the basic skills necessary to begin communicating in Chinese. The secondary goal of gaining insight in the Chinese language world comes by means of performing the language with an understanding of cultural and contextual appropriateness. Emphasis is placed on four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with a primary focus on oral communication. Class meets three times per week as well as for a conversation session with native speakers. Conducted both in Chinese and English.
4 Credits | Fall

102. Chinese II — A continuation of Chinese I. This course is designed to continue to develop appropriate communicative skills in the Chinese language world. Emphasis is placed on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with a primary focus on oral communication. In this course, writing simple sentences in Chinese will also be introduced. Conducted primarily in Chinese. Chin 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

195. Studies in Chinese — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

201. Chinese III — A continuation of Chinese II. Further study of basic Chinese grammar and continued study of the Chinese writing system, with equal emphasis on speaking and reading. This course helps students develop more linguistic skills, to expand on vocabulary and expressions appropriate to different occasions, and to systematically review previously studied materials. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to write 100 characters and to conduct a spontaneous conversation with a native speaker.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

202. Chinese IV - Intermediate Chinese — A continuation of Chinese III. This course completes the study of beginning Chinese and gives further study of the Chinese writing system, with continued emphasis on both speaking and reading. In this course, we continue improving skills required for writing essays in Chinese. This course helps students to further expand their vocabulary bank, to communicate in Chinese on wider and deeper topics, and also to get a greater insight into Chinese language and culture. Upon completion of this course, students should be able to compose simple and meaningful sentences and initiate a conversation with a native speaker.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

295. Studies in Chinese — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

301. Chinese V Language and Culture — Intermediate Chinese language and culture focuses on word order review, conversation, and the study of Chinese and Asian cultures. Students will gain increased communicative competency and cultural knowledge before studying abroad in a Chinese speaking country. Conducted in Chinese. Chin 202 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

302. Chinese VI Language and Culture — A continuation of Chinese V. This course is designed to expand on the communicative skills acquired in the sequence of Chinese I–V. The secondary objective is to provide the student with basic oral and written translation skills. Chin 301 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

395. Studies in Chinese — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As needed

495. Studies in Chinese — A course designed for advanced students of Chinese. The primary object of this course is to enhance speaking, listening, reading, writing and translation skills in the higher level. Chin 302 is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | As needed

101. Dutch I — A course for beginners in Dutch language study. The primary objective is to enable the student to acquire beginning communicative Dutch. An important secondary objective is to help the student develop significant insights into the culture of the Netherlands and other areas of the world where Dutch is spoken. All four language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing -- are stressed. Conducted primarily in Dutch.
4 Credits | As Needed

102. Dutch II — Continuation of Dutch I, building upon the communication skills acquired there. The emphases upon learning to understand spoken Dutch and using it actively are continued, while reading and writing skills are stressed somewhat more than in the first semester. Dut 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

195. Studies in Dutch — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
2-4 Credits | As Needed

295. Studies in Dutch Language and Literature — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

101. French I — An introductory course teaching beginning communicative skills and enabling the student to develop cultural insights into the French-speaking world. Emphasis is on class participation through authentic video and audio materials, short readings and compositions. Students meet four times per week with the instructor.
4 Credits | Fall

102. French II — Further development of basic communicative skills with added emphasis on conversational practice, short readings and compositions. Students meet three times per week with the instructor and once a week in Conversation class. Conducted primarily in French. Fren 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

201. French III - French Language and Culture — Continuation of French II. This course uses film segments to develop listening, speaking, reading and writing skills, and to address contemporary cultural topics such as the family, French college students, employment, leisure activities, and the arts. Students meet three times per week with the instructor and once a week with the French language assistant. Conducted primarily in French. Fren 102 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

250. French IV - Advanced French Language and Culture — Through grammar review, conversation, and the study of French and francophone cultures and writers, students will gain increased communicative competency and cultural knowledge of French-speaking global communities in North Africa (Algeria), Europe (Switzerland), West Africa (Senegal), the Pacific (New Caledonia), and the Antilles (Guadeloupe/Martinique). Students meet three times per week with the instructor and once a week with the French language assistant. Conducted entirely in French. Fren 201 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2), Global Learning International (GLI)

280. Practicum in French — Practical experience in the French language in various contexts such as teaching French at the elementary level, translating, or using French skills in business. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit, but a maximum of two credits from French 280 may be counted as part of a French major or minor. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in French Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

311. French Grammar and Phonetics — An intensive, activity-based review of French grammar and phonetics for greater fluency of expression. A combination of exercises, games, and discussions. Conducted entirely in French. Students meet three times per week with the instructor and once a week with the French language assistant. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall

313. French Conversation — Through authentic videos and CDs, articles from French newspapers and magazines, poems, short stories, and French internet sites, skits and oral presentations, students will increase their vocabulary, improve their communicative ability, and review grammar when needed. Topics will include daily life in France, current events, the media, the new technologies, the environment and the French popular culture (visual arts, graphic novels, music and films). Conducted entirely in French. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As needed

341. Introduction to French Culture and Society — Introduction to French culture and society from the Middle Ages to the present. Possible topics include the role and accomplishments of past and contemporary French women and the visual arts through the study of architecture and paintings from the era of the Cathedrals to abstract art. Materials are drawn from historical accounts, literary works, and artistic production of the different periods. Documentary videos and films are an integral component of this course. Conducted entirely in French. Students meet three times per week with the instructor and once a week with the French language assistant. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall

342. French Society from the Revolution to the 21st Century — A topics-oriented introduction to the intellectual, social, historical, and artistic developments in French society from the 18th to the 21st century. Topics for the course will include one of the following: Paris, Myth and Reality; French Novels and Films. Conducted entirely in French. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As needed

343. Contemporary France — In this course, students will familiarize themselves with cultural, linguistic, and social trends and policies in contemporary French society. Topics include the provinces of France, religion, the European Union, immigration, the family, politics, and education. A wide variety of sources from historical accounts and newspaper articles to literary works and recent French films, will enable students to sharpen their understanding of current events and become discerning readers of French and international news. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Global Learning International (GLI)

344. Francophone Cultures — A study of aspects of Francophone cultures. Topics include language and communication; marriage, and gender roles; immigration (Europe, Africa, Canada, Vietnam, and the Caribbean); cultural and religious practices, and the arts. Materials are drawn from novels, short stories, plays, newspapers, films, music, and video documentation. Conducted entirely in French. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Global Learning International (GLI)

345. French Life Writings — An investigation of autobiography through reading, analysis, and discussion of life writings from France and francophone countries. Representative authors include Apollinaire, Colette, Delerm, Nothomb, Sartre, Sarraute, Duras and Brisac. Emphasis is on the development of critical analysis of texts and of writing abilities through students’ research and own autobiographical essays. Conducted entirely in French. Fren 250 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As needed

346. French for the Professions — In this course, students will look at the economy, political system and social life of France. Students will learn how to interview for a position, hire someone for a company, make arrangements for a meeting or a stay in France. We use authentic material and current information (from newspapers, magazines, web sites, videos), to help develop your proficiency in oral and written French. The course focuses heavily on oral communication.
4 Credits | As Needed

380. French House Practicum — A conversation practicum for students who are residing at the French House. Cultural and language-oriented activities will form part of the practicum, directed by the native assistant under an instructor's supervision. This course may be repeated for credit, but a maximum of one credit may be counted as part of a French major or minor. Fren 102 is highly recommended prior to this course.
.5 Credits | Fall, Spring

395. Topics in French — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

399. Internship in French — This course provides supervised practical experience in international business, media, education, or government. It is taken in conjunction with an existing off-campus program. Following consultation with the off-campus program director, each applicant for this internship is required to submit a proposal describing in detail the program to be pursued, including the materials which will be submitted; a time schedule for submitting evidence; and the criteria for performance evaluation. This course does not substitute for a 400-level class seminar.
4-8 Credits | As Needed

441. The Francophone Experience — This topics-oriented course explores francophone culture of French-speaking societies in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and the Americas. Topics for the course will include one of the following: Francophone Culture and society of Africa and the Caribbean; The Francophone Experience: From Vietnam to Quebec; Francophone Culture: Lebanon and the Maghreb. These topics will cover issues such as decolonization, the search for cultural, religious, and linguistic identity; the clash between modernity and tradition; and the status of women. Readings will be selected from the works of Bey, Carrier, Césaire, Chédid, Fanon, Djébar, Condé, Schwartz-Bart, Hébert, Oyono, and Zobel. Two 300-level Fren courses with a grade of C+ or better are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed | Global Learning International (GLI)

443. Early Modern French Studies — A course on the literary, historical, socio-political, economic, and artistic developments in French society from the Renaissance period to the French Revolution. Topics include one of the following: The Birth of the French Arts de Vivre; Faith and Politics in Early Modern France; Great French Queens, Nuns, Warriors, and Artists from the Renaissance to the 18th Century; stories of passion. Two 300-level Fren courses with a grade of C+ or better are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

444. Contemporary French Cultural Studies — This is a topics-oriented course that explores issues and texts central to 20th century French culture. Topics include one of the following: Modern French Life Writings; “Voyage, voyages”: travel as exploration and introspection; France and the French: the French “Art de Vivre.” The course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Two 300-level Fren courses with a grade of C+ or better are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall

490. Special Problems in French — Individual study under the direction of an instructor in one of the following areas: literature, civilization, or language methodology. A maximum of four credits may be counted toward the major. One 400-level Fren course with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

493. Senior Research Project — An independent study designed to help students going to graduate school to develop advanced research skills and culminating in a thesis or equivalent project. One 400-level Fren course with a C+ or better and senior standing are highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Permission of chairperson
3-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Studies in French Culture — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and expertise. Two 300-level Fren courses with a C+ or better are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As needed | Global Learning International (GLI)

101. German I — Introduction to the German language and the cultures of Germany, Austria and Switzerland where German is spoken. Students will work towards practical proficiency for real-world use of German at work or when traveling.
4 Credits | Fall

102. German II — Continuation of German I with continued emphasis on practical real-world use of German as well as extensive coverage of the cultures of the German-speaking countries. Germ 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

201. German III — Continuation of German II. This course focuses equally on language and culture, with particular emphasis on celebrations, media, travel, and post-WWII history. Students meet three days a week in class and one day a week in a tutorial with a native German assistant for focused conversation practice and contemporary German culture. Conducted in German. Germ 102 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2), Global Learning International (GLI)

202. German IV — Continuation of German III. This course focuses particular emphasis on multicultural Germany, former East Germany and German folklore. It is an excellent preparation for study abroad. Students meet three days a week in class and one day a week in a tutorial with a native German assistant for focused conversation practice. Conducted in German. Germ 201 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2), Global Learning International (GLI)

280. Practicum in German — Practical experience in the German language in various contexts such as teaching German at the elementary level, translating, or using German skills in business. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit but a maximum of two credits from Germ 280 may be counted as part of a German major or minor.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor or chairperson
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in Germanic Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

311. The German Speaking World — The cultural focus for this course is Germany as a social state, Austria, Switzerland and a brief survey of German cultural history. The course is designed to provide students extensive practice with real-world German, and form an introduction to more formal cultural concepts to prepare students for study abroad and further study of German at the upper-division level. Conducted in German. Germ 202 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall

313. German for Business — Introduction to the essential vocabulary and style specific to German commercial transactions, as well as to the basic workings of the German economy. Students familiarize themselves with the German used in commerce and economics, industry and labor, import and export, transportation systems, communication, banking, marketing, management-labor relations, and Germany's role in the European Union. Students develop reading, listening, speaking and writing skills using contemporary economics and business texts and conventions. Conducted in German. Germ 202 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

325. German Cinema — A survey of recent German films including comedies, dramas and films addressing current social issues. Particular emphasis is placed on vocabulary development, learning about current German culture and viewing and responding to films. Conducted in German. Germ 311 is highly recommended prior to this course.
2 or 4 Credits | Fall

333. German Theatre — Creation and production of a German play. Students write/edit and stage a play in German, developing proficiency in the language through readings by several authors, such as Friedrich Durrenmatt and Bertolt Brecht, including theoretical writings on the theater. This play will be performed publicly. Conducted in German. Germ 202 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

355. Germany Live — Building on the current explosion in e mail, the World Wide Web and cyberspace, this course will introduce students to Germany through these electronic media. Students will become familiar with many aspects of contemporary German life and culture, such as politics, music, current events, through text, audio, video and other media on line through the Internet. The capstone of the course will be a group project in which students actually build a functioning German language Web site focused on a particular aspect of German culture and life. Conducted in German. Germ 202 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

375. Introduction to German Meisterwerke — This survey of the most significant works of German Literature serves as an introduction to the study of literature in the German language. We will examine and analyze poetry, drama, and Novellen by a variety of authors and learn approaches to secondary literature. Conducted entirely in German. Germ 202 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring

380. German House Practicum — A conversation practicum for students who are residing in the German House. Cultural and language-oriented activities form part of the practicum, directed by the native assistant under the supervision of an instructor. May be repeated for credit but a maximum of one credit of Germ 380 may be counted as part of a German major or minor. Germ 102 is highly recommended prior to this course.
.5 Credits | Fall, Spring

395. Studies in German Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

452. The Germanic World Today: From Weimar to Wiedervereinigung — A study of 20th century German culture, including economic, political, sociological, and creative forces and their influence on the German speaking world. Conducted in German. Two 300-level Germ courses is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

455. Germanic Civilization: Myth and Mythology — A study of origins, development, and significance of Germanic civilization, exploring creation and doomsday mythology, tribal life, courtly society, Minnesang, Hildegard von Bingen, Barbarossa, Luther, Faust, Zarathustra, Grimm Brothers, Marx, Spengler, Wagner, and Nazi mythology. Two 300-level Germ courses is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

464. The German Language Yesterday and Today — An introduction to the history and development of the German language from runes (tribal times) to the present. Topics covered include the relationship of German to English and other European languages, changes in the German language, German dialects and a contrastive analysis of German and English geared to future language teachers. Course conducted in German. Two 300-level Germ courses is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

470. Individual and Society in the German Novelle — A study of major authors of the 19th century (Droste-Huelshoff, Moerike, Stifter, Storm, Keller, Meyer, Fontane), who developed the Novelle, a uniquely German narrative, used extensively to present significant social changes. Conducted entirely in German. Germ 375 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

475. German Literature From the Weimar Republic to the Present — A study of representative works by major modern German authors (Brecht, Boell, Grass, Frisch, Duerrenmatt, Handke, and writers from the former East Germany). Germ 375 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

490. Special Problems in German — Individual study under the direction of an instructor designated by the chairperson of the department in one of the following areas: literature, language, civilization, or methodology. This course may be repeated upon consultation with departmental faculty advisor; a maximum of eight credits may be counted toward the major. One 400-level Germ course is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Studies in German Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

499. Internship in German — This course provides supervised practical experience in international business, media, education, or government. Normally junior status and the completion of at least a German minor are prerequisites. Although ordinarily taken in conjunction with an existing off-campus program, students working together with faculty may make individual arrangements with a local host institution or organization. Following consultation with the off-campus coordinator, each applicant for this internship is required to submit a proposal describing in detail the program to be pursued, including the materials which will be submitted; a time schedule for submitting evidence; and the criteria for performance evaluation. If possible, proposals should be finalized prior to the semester in which the internship will occur. The number of credits to be determined in consultation with instructor and the chairperson. May be repeated for credit but a maximum of two credits from Germ 499 may be counted as part of a German major or minor.
Prerequisites: Permission of chairperson
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

101. Japanese I — A course for beginners of Japanese. The primary goal of this course is to acquire the basic skills necessary to begin communicating in Japanese. The secondary goal of gaining insight into the Japanese language world comes by means of performing the language with an understanding of cultural and contextual appropriateness. Emphasis is placed on four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with a primary focus on oral communication. Class meets four days per week. Online work is also required. Conducted both in Japanese and English.
4 Credits | Fall

102. Japanese II — A continuation of Japanese I. This course is designed to continue to develop appropriate communicative skills in the Japanese language world. Class meets four days per week. Online work is also required. Emphasis is placed on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with a primary focus on oral communication. Conducted primarily in Japanese. Japn 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

201. Japanese III — A continuation of Japanese II. The objective of this course is to further expand communicative skills in Japanese with cultural and contextual appropriateness. Class meets four days per week. Online work is also required. Japn 102 with a grade of C or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

202. Japanese IV — A continuation of Japanese III with added emphasis on reading and writing skills. Class meets four days per week. Online work is also required. Conducted primarily in Japanese. The prerequisite can also be met with an equivalent course or placement. Japn 201 with a grade of C or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

280. Practicum in Japanese — Practical experience in the Japanese language in various contexts such as teaching Japanese culture at the elementary level or using Japanese skills in business. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. This course may be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Intro to Japanese Culture and History — An overview of Japanese culture and history from ancient to modern times. This course takes an in-depth look at the modern Japanese scene first, including business, society, education, politics, and religion; and, secondly, moves into historical Japan. The course consists of lectures, presentations, multi-media and some practical Japanese lessons. Conducted in English.
4 Credits | Summer

299. Apprentice Teaching Internship — A practical and contractual internship in assisting the beginning level of Japanese classes. Enrollment by selection.
0 Credits | Fall

301. Advanced Japanese I — This course is designed to develop more advanced communicative skills with emphasis placed upon acquiring greater proficiency in performing the language in a culturally appropriate manner. Conducted in Japanese. Japn 202 with a grade of C or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

302. Advanced Japanese II — A continuation of Japn 302. This course is designed to expand on the communicative skills acquired in the sequence of Japanese I-IV and Advanced Japanese I. The secondary objective is to provide the student with a basic skill of translation. Jap 301 with a grade of C or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

399. Apprentice Teaching Internship — A practical and contractual internship in assisting the beginning level of Japanese classes. Enrollment by selection.
0 Credits | Spring

490. Special Problems in Japanese — Individual study under the direction of an instructor designated by the chairperson of the department in one of the following areas: literature, language, civilization or methodology. This course may be repeated upon consultation with departmental faculty advisor; a maximum of eight credits may be counted toward the major.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Studies in Japanese Language and Translation — A course designed for advanced students of Japanese. The primary object of this course is to enhance speaking, listening, reading, writing and translation skills in the higher level. Students are required to take the Japanese Language Proficiency Test instituted by the Japanese Ministry of Education at the end of the semester. The secondary objective is to provide the student with an advanced skill of translation and understanding of business in Japan. Conducted entirely in Japanese. The prerequisite can also be met with an equivalent course or placement. Japn 302 with a grade of C or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

499. Internship in Japanese — This course provides supervised practical experience in international business, media, education or government. Normally junior status and the completion of at least a Japanese minor are prerequisites. Although ordinarily taken in conjunction with an existing off-campus program, students working together with faculty may make individual arrangements with a local host institution of organization. Following consultation with the off-campus coordinator, each applicant for this internship is required to submit a proposal describing in detail this program to be pursued, including the materials which will be submitted; a time schedule for submitting evidence; and the criteria for performance evaluation. If possible, proposals should be finalized prior to the semester in which the internship will occur. The number of credits to be determined in consultation with instructor and the chairperson. This course may be repeated for credit
Prerequisites: Permission of chairperson
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in Linguistics — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

364. Intro Descriptive Linguistics — An introduction to the science of general and descriptive linguistics, with a consideration of the problems of the phonemic, morphemic and syntactical analysis of language. This course fulfills the linguistics requirement for French and Latin teaching majors and minors, and German teaching majors. Instructor approval required for Spanish majors and minors.
4 Credits | As Needed

395. Studies in Linguistics — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

101. Russian I — A course for beginners of Russian. The primary objective of this course is to enable the student to acquire the basic skills necessary to begin communicating in Russian. The secondary objective is to begin to give the student insight into the Russian language world. Emphasis is placed on all four language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Conducted in English and Russian.
4 Credits | Fall

102. Russian II — A continuation of Russ 101. This course is designed primarily to continue to develop the acquisition of a comfortable communication knowledge of Russian. A secondary objective is to expand the student's insight into important features of Russian society. Emphasis on all four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Conducted primarily in Russian. Russ 101 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Second Language (FL2)

201. Russian III — Continuation of Russ 102 with greater emphasis on reading. Culture will also be studied in additional depth. Russ 102 with a grade of C- or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall | Second Language (FL2)

202. Russian IV — Continuation of Russ 201 with greater emphasis on writing. Cultural history will be touched on through the medium of short stories in Russian. Russ 201 with a grade of C- or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

295. Studies in Russian Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

121. Spanish I — A course for beginners of Spanish. The primary objective of this course is to enable the student to acquire beginning communicative skills in Spanish. The secondary objective is to help the student develop insights into the Spanish language world. Emphasis is placed on all four language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. Conducted primarily in Spanish.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

122. Spanish II — This course is designed primarily to continue the development of a comfortable communicative knowledge of Spanish. A secondary objective is to expand students' insight into important aspects of Hispanic culture. Emphasis on all four language skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. Conducted primarily in Spanish. Span 121 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

195. Studies in Spanish — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed | Second Language (FL2)

221. Spanish III — A thorough review of structures learned in the first year with added emphasis on reading and writing skills, as well as the study of the culture in greater depth. Span 122 or Span 124 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

222. Spanish IV — This course introduces students to the Spanish-speaking world, its cultures and history. The course contoinues the development of language competency through reading and writing, and convrsational practice. A general review of grammar also takes place. Conducted in Spanish. Span 221 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

280. Practicum in Spanish — Practical experience in the Spanish language in various contexts such as teaching Spanish at the elementary level, translating, or using Spanish skills in business. The number of credits granted will be determined by the number of hours involved per week. May be repeated for credit but a maximum of two credits from Span 280 may be counted as part of a Spanish major or minor.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in Hispanic Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
3-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

321. Spanish V - Advanced Grammar and Conversation — A course designed to improve student language competency in Spanish through an in-depth review of grammar and continued work in listening, reading, speaking and writing. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Specific Span 321 sections are offered for heritage and native or near-native speakers of Spanish. Span 222 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

322. Spanish VI - Advanced Grammar and Composition — A continuation of Span 321, this course is designed to improve student language competency in Spanish, with particular emphasis on writing. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Span 321 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Second Language (FL2)

325. Spanish Conversation — A course designed to develop oral competency in Spanish. Conducted entirely in Spanish. May be repeated for credit but may be counted only once as part of Spanish major or minor. Span 222 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
1 Credit | Fall, Spring

341. Introduction to Literature — In this transition course from language to literature, students become familiar with the key literary terms for further studies in Hispanic literature. Readings represent different time periods and various literary genres and reinforce grammatical structures, linguistic content, and general familiarity with current Spanish usage. Conducted in Spanish. Span 322 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

342. Modern Spanish Literature and Culture (or equivalent) — A survey of Spain from 1808 to the present. Through film and literature, the course explores the cultural production and representations of the historical, social, political and economic experiences Spain experienced during those years, as well as the rich and varied cultural heritage of the country. Span 341 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Yearly | Global Learning International (GLI)

344. Modern Hispanic American Literature and Culture (or equivalent) — A study of Hispanic American literature and cultural production from the wars of independence until the present (19th and 20th Centuries). Politics and important historical events are discussed through the analysis of literary texts and most representative works of the corresponding period (other sources such as documentary videos, newspapers, and films are considered). Students are exposed to a wide variety of literary genres ranging from narrative, drama, poetry, essay, etc. Conducted in Spanish. Span 341 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Yearly | Global Learning International (GLI)

380. Spanish House Practicum — A conversation practicum for students who are residing in the Spanish House. Cultural and language-oriented activities form part of the practicum, directed by the Spanish native assistant under the supervision of an instructor. May be repeated for credit but a maximum of 1 credit of Span 380 may be counted as part of a Spanish major or minor. Span 222 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
.5 Credits | Fall, Spring

395. Topics in Spanish — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

421. Business Spanish — This course is designed to give advanced-intermediate and advanced level students a solid foundation in business vocabulary, basic business and cultural concepts, and situational practice necessary to be successful in today's Spanish-speaking world. It is assumed that students have already mastered the fundamentals of Spanish grammar and that they control the general vocabulary needed for basic communication. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Span 341 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | As Needed

441. Medieval and Golden Age Spain (or equivalent) — A survey of Medieval and Golden Age Spain as expressed in literary selections of Spanish prose, poetry, and theater. Cultural and literary topics include the Reconquest, religious ideals, courtly love, mystical poetry, and the social crises during the Hapsburg reign. Emphasis on reading, writing, and conversational skills. Materials are also drawn from films and videos. Conducted in Spanish. Span 342 or Span 344 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Yearly

443. Pre-Columbian/Colonial Hispanic American Literature (or equivalent) — A study of colonial Hispanic American literature from pre-Columbian works and the chronicles of encounter, through the 19th century literary manifestations of political and cultural (in)dependence. Possible topics include the cultural heritage and identity of both the colonizer and the colonized; the concept of historicism; canonical genres and their adaptations; Center vs. Periphery; discourse, counterdiscourse and the marginalized voice; criollismo; the relationships of socioeconomic progress and literary development and (in)dependence, etc. Students are exposed to a wide variety of literary genres ranging from narratives to dramas, poetry and essays, as well as pertinent historical background information. Conducted in Spanish. Span 342 or Span 344 with a grade of C+ is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Yearly

462. Spanish Linguistics — A course for advanced students of Spanish. The primary objective of this course is to approach the grammar of Spanish in a way which is most useful for those who will teach Spanish to native speakers of English. It is a course in Applied Linguistics where the knowledge of the structure of the Spanish language is discussed and supported by the study of both Spanish and English. Fields dealt with include: Phonetics and Phonology, Morphology, Syntax, Semantics, Second Language Acquisition, and Language and Culture. This course counts both as the Linguistics requirement and as an elective. Conducted in Spanish. Span 341 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

490. Special Problems in Spanish — Individual study under the direction of an instructor designated by the chairperson of the department in one of the following areas: literature, language, civilization, or methodology. May be repeated for credit but a maximum of 2 credits from Span 490 may be counted as part of a Spanish major or minor.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
3-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

494. Literature Seminar — A course in advanced literary studies whose topic varies from year to year depending on the interests of students and the on-going research interests of Spanish faculty at any given time. Emphasis on critical thinking and writing of well-developed papers. Recommended for students planning on graduate studies in Spanish. Conducted entirely in Spanish. Span 342 or Span 344 with a grade of C+ or better is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Yearly

495. Studies in Spanish Language and Literature — A course designed to allow a professor to teach in an area of special interest and experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-8 Credits | Fall, Spring

499. Internship in Spanish — This course provides supervised practical experience in international business, media, education, or government. Although ordinarily taken in conjunction with an existing off-campus program, students working together with faculty may make individual arrangements with a local host institution or organization. Following consultation with the off-campus coordinator, each applicant for this internship is required to submit a proposal describing in detail the program to be pursued, including the materials which will be submitted; a time schedule for submitting evidence; and the criteria for performance evaluation. If possible, proposals should be finalized prior to the semester in which the internship will occur. The number of credits to be determined in consultation with instructor and chairperson. As part of a major or minor, this may be counted as an elective for 4 credits. Junior status and the completion of at least a Spanish minor are highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Permission of chairperson
1-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

  • Andre, Dr. MariaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center -Room 220 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

  • Awad, HabeebHope CollegePaul G. Fried Center for Global EngagementModern and Classical Languages DepartmentAsian Studies

    Martha Miller Center 118 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7608

  • Bradley, RichHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 208 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

  • Carrasco de Miguel, Dr. BertaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 224 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7957

    More Information
  • Cheng, AudreyHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Floor 2 Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570

  • Chuang, Dr. FloraHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages DepartmentAsian Studies

    Martha Miller Center 212 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7293

    More Information
  • Cunningham, Dr. DavidHope CollegeKlooster Center for Excellence in WritingModern and Classical Languages DepartmentCrossRoads Project

    VanWylen Library 53 Graves Place Holland, MI 49423-3617

    Work616.395.7121

    More Information
  • De Grau Amaya, RodrigoHope CollegePaul G. Fried Center for Global EngagementModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 208 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7570

  • deHaan, Dr. SanderHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center -Room 218 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7560

  • Dentel, MariaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 208 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7563

  • Dorado, Dr. LilianaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center -Room 227 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7565

  • Duclos, DelphineHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570

  • Erskine, TimothyHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570

  • Fernandez-Dominguez, Dr. RenataHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages DepartmentInternational Studies

    Martha Miller Center -Room 225 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7314

  • Forester, Dr. LeeHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center -Room 219 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7567

    More Information
  • Gyulamiryan, Dr. TatevikHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 223 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7557

    More Information
  • Hamon-Porter, Dr. BrigitteHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages DepartmentInternational Studies

    Martha Miller Center -Room 229 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7132

  • Kallemeyn, SylviaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center -Room 232 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7981

  • Kraut, JoshuaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570

  • Maiullo, Dr. StephenHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 230 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7761

  • McGrath, ChristopherHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 208 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7563

  • Mulder, MelissaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center -Room 214 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7566

  • Nakajima, AndyHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages DepartmentAsian Studies

    Martha Miller Center -Room 231 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7885

    More Information
  • Remy, Dr. PaulineHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 221 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7933

  • Stephenson, MandyHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3698

    Work616.395.7570

  • ten Berge, BramHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570

  • Tsai, JoanneHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570

  • Woolsey, Dr. DanielHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center-Room 228 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7269

    More Information
  • Yasuhara, EmmaHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center-Room 213 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423-3615

    Work616.395.7439

  • Zwyghuizen, MelanieHope CollegeModern and Classical Languages Department

    Martha Miller Center 257 Columbia Avenue Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7570