Psychology

The Department of Psychology provides its students with a strong base in psychology's methods and concepts in order to prepare them to think critically about behavior and to pursue graduate study or practical applications of psychology.

The department believes that the best preparation for the unpredictable future comes through acquiring the intellectual tools that enable students to be problem solvers, to change and grow as old ways become obsolete and new approaches become available.

The department offers students opportunities to experience psychology in action, thereby shaping their personal visions. Several of the department's courses offer the opportunity for research experience. The department also offers many internships with Holland area human-service agencies and businesses. Other internships and research opportunities are available on campus and through off-campus study programs at The Philadelphia Center and the Chicago Semester.

The department's exceptional facilities include multimedia instruction, an EEG machine, a psychophysiology laboratory, a psychoacoustics laboratory and other computer-controlled laboratories for data collection and analysis. Many students collaborate with faculty in research in much the same way that graduate students do in universities. Each year psychology students are involved in collaborative research and many present their research at professional conferences.

Hope's Department of Psychology is nationally recognized. The international honor society in psychology has awarded at least one of our students a regional research award 15 of the last 18 years (nine years with multiple winners); approximately 20 are awarded per year out of more than 250 applicants from the 11-state Midwest region. Several leading psychology textbooks and multi-media instructional resources are authored by department faculty. Many of the department's recent graduates have been recruited by top graduate schools, assuring that the department will continue to be a prominent source of future psychologists. Additional information about psychology faculty and their research interests and about alumni is available on our website.

Majors

Those psychology majors intending to work in the human-service professions with a B.A. degree or intending to seek an advanced degree in this area (e.g., masters or doctorate) should consider courses aimed at developing both helping skills and research/evaluation skills.

Currently, helping skills can be learned in the PSY 265 – Theory and Practice of Helping course. Other pertinent courses include COMM 210, 220 and 330.

Students considering work in probation and the criminal justice system might want to take POL 237 and 339 and SOC 221 and 222.

Human service professions related courses include SOC 101, 232 and 233 and IDS 200 – Encounter with Cultures.

Students interested in human resources and/or business should take PSY 350 and MGMT 222. Consultation with your psychology advisor is recommended in making choices from among the courses listed above. Students intending to enroll in an MSW program can choose either the social work major or the psychology major. Recommended courses for other possible career paths for psychology majors, information about careers in psychology and information about graduate study in psychology are available on our website .

Psychology

The psychology major is composed of a minimum of 32 credits plus a statistics course. Only one psychology course may be transferred into the major (unless the student is a transfer student).The major requirements are broken down into the following elements:

Fundamental Courses

All majors must take:

  • PSY 100 – Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY 200 – Research Methods
  • MAT 210 or MAT 311 – Statistics

Survey Courses

Students must take four of the following courses:

  • PSY 211/NSCI 211 – Introduction to Neuroscience
  • PSY 230 – Developmental Psychology
  • PSY 280 – Social Psychology
  • PSY 340 – Cognitive Psychology
  • PSY 370 – Behavior Disorders
Topical Seminar
Students must take four credits of topical seminars, which vary from semester to semester, with the following as examples:

  • PSY 308 – Multicultural Psychology, 4 credits
  • PSY 350 – Industrial/Organizational Psychology, 4 credits
  • PSY 382 – Psychology of Gender, 4 credits
  • PSY 390 – Advanced Research, 4 credits
  • PSY 395 – Studies in Psychology, 2 or 4 credits
  • PSY 410 – Clinical Psychology, 4 credits
  • PSY 420 – Health Psychology, 4 credits
  • PSY 435 - Psychological Science and Religion, 4 credits
Electives

Four additional credits in psychology are required, and these credits may be from another survey course, seminar course, or one of the following courses:

  • EDUC 225 and KIN 371 will also count toward the major.
  • PSY 235 does not count toward the major.
cultural Diversity

The Psychology Department believes it is essential for students to develop cultural perspective-taking. Students are required to take six credits of courses identified as having a Global Learning focus. These courses do not need to be psychology courses.

Service Learning or Field Experience

Students are required to participate in one service-learning course. This can be fulfilled by taking Developmental Psychology or Psychology Internship.

Students who are interested in attending a research-based graduate program are encouraged to take PSY 390 – Advanced Research or a PSY 295/395 course that focuses on conducting research. Students interested in a career in the helping professions are encouraged to take PSY 265

Students who have questions about whether the prescribed 32-credit major is the most appropriate one for them or who would like to form a composite major may design, in consultation with their psychology advisor, a major program suited to their unique needs and goals. A written copy of this alternate major program is filed with the department chairperson. Students interested in an alternative major should contact the Department of Psychology chairperson or their psychology advisor as soon as possible.

Minors

Psychology

The psychology minor consists of a minimum of 20 credits of psychology. Only one psychology course may be transferred in to count toward the minor (unless the student is a transfer student). The minor includes the following required courses:

Fundamental Courses

All minors must take:

  • PSY 100 – Introduction to Psychology
  • PSY 200 – Research Methods
Survey Courses

Students must take two of the following courses:

  • PSY 211 – Introduction to Neuroscience Lecture/Lab
  • PSY 230 – Developmental Psychology
  • PSY 280 – Social Psychology
  • PSY 340 – Cognitive Psychology
  • PSY 370 – Behavior Disorders
Elective Course

Students must take 4 credits of elective course work. Courses must be in the psychology curriculum, with recommendation to take a Survey, Seminar, Psychology Internship, Theory and Practice of Helping, or Race in America. 

Courses that cannot be taken for the minor include PSY 335 Brain and Cognition, EDUC 225 Exceptional Child, KIN 371 Sport and Performance Psychology, PSY 290 Supervised Study and PSY 490 Special Studies.

Psychology Education

Students who minor in psychology for teaching certification must take a minimum of 20 credits in psychology. EDUC 225/226 (Exceptional Child) cannot be used for a teaching minor in psychology. See the Department of Education web page for more information about courses required for this minor.

Psychology

100. Introduction to Psychology — An introduction to the science of behavior and mental life, ranging from biological foundations to social and cultural influences on behavior (introducing most of the content areas covered in other psychology courses). Laboratory experiments and exercises provide hands-on experience.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Social Science 1 (SS1)

110. Race in America — Social understandings of race in the United States have changed dramatically over the last 500 years, but race still determines many of our life experiences and shapes our personal, social, and political views. In this course, students will read psychological research and other literature on the role of race in twenty-first century America and explore how we can work together toward greater justice, respect, and appreciation in an increasingly diverse society.
2 Credits | Fall | Global Learning Domestic (GLD), Social Science 2 (SS2)

200. Research Methods — A beginning study of research methodology in contemporary psychology. Specific examples from different areas of psychology are used to teach the student basic concepts and methods of observation, measurement, hypothesis formation, experimental design, data collection, data analysis, interpretation and generalization. Laboratory projects provide hands-on experience with an emphasis on experiments. Math 210 or equivalent is highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Psy 100
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

211. Introduction to Neuroscience — This interdisciplinary course covers basic information from biology, chemistry, psychology, and philosophy that is relevant for understanding the nervous system and its role in behavior. Topics include structure and function of neurons, brain anatomy, sensory and motor systems, and the neuroscience of motivation, emotion, sleep, memory, language, and consciousness. Laboratory projects expose students to research methods in neuroscience, including monitoring the activity of individual neurons and recording physiological responses from humans. Three hours of lecture plus one 3-hour lab session per week.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

225. The Exceptional Child — See course description under Educ 225. This may be used as an elective for the psychology major, but not the psychology minor.

230. Developmental Psychology — An introduction to theories, research methods, and findings related to physical, intellectual, linguistic, emotional, perceptual, social and personality development during the life-span, with emphasis on childhood and adolescence. All students will participate in a field placement or other practical experience. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

235. Brain and Cognition — This course is designed for Special Education Learning Disabilities majors. It will explore the rapidly expanding fields of cognition and brain function. It combines topics from two fields of psychology, physiological psychology and cognitive psychology. Course covers the basic anatomy and physiology of the brain, and then this material will be used in learning about the remaining course topics. Does not count for psychology major or minor credit.
4 Credits | Spring

240. Human Sexuality — This course will provide an overview of human sexual behavior. The course will cover developmental, biological and neurological explanations of sexual behavior, cultural and social explanations, and clinical conditions related to sexuality. In addition, the course will attempt to integrate historical, philosophical, and theological understandings of human sexual behavior.
2 Credits | Spring

265. The Theory and Practice of Helping — Helping skills are essential to conducting an effective interview, whether the interview takes place in counseling, social work, nursing, personnel work, or the ministry. The course teaches concepts and skills that are designed to help the student develop specific competencies in helping relationships. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
2 Credits | Fall

280. Social Psychology — The scientific study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Topics include the self, conformity, persuasion, prejudice, and interpersonal attraction. Data collection and analysis are part of the laboratory experience. Psy 100 and Psy 200 are highly recommended prior to this course. Cross-listed as Soc 280.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

290. Supervised Study in Psychology — Designed to give the psychology student first-hand learning in laboratory settings or in a field placement under faculty supervision. It is the student's responsibility to obtain prior approval of the project from the faculty supervisor. One to four credits may be taken for a grade (0 credit pass/fail option available). May be repeated for credit but no credit can be applied to the 20-credit psychology minor.
Prerequisites: Psy 100, Permission of instructor
0-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

295. Studies in Psychology — An experimental lecture or seminar course designed as a one-time or trial offering. May be repeated for credit but no more than four credits may be applied to the 20-credit Psychology minor. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | As needed

308. Multicultural Psychology — This course will address how culture influences the individual’s thinking and behavior. It is designed to address both the universality and cultural specificity of psychological principles and theories. The course will cover general topics such as: What is culture? How does it influence the individual? And what is multiculturalism? The course will address theories of multicultural psychology, research and assessment in biological, social, developmental and personality psychology. The course will also examine multicultural issues by learning about the four major minority groups in the USA. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD)

325. Health Psychology — This course is taught in a seminar format and investigates how psychological factors affect aspects of health and illness. A biopsychosocial model is used to examine issues in: 1) health behaviors and primary intervention, 2) stress, illness, and stress reductions, 3) the management of pain and discomfort, and 4) the management of chronic and terminal illness. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

340. Cognitive Psychology — An introduction to the major topics in cognitive psychology including perception, attention, memory, imagery, knowledge representation, categorization, problem solving, language, decision making, and reasoning. Theories dealing with these issues will be reviewed with an emphasis on current research findings and applications. Data collection and analysis are part of the laboratory experience. Psy 100 and Psy 200 are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall

350. Industrial/Organizational Psychology — This course applies psychology to the workplace. An introduction to the major topics including personnel selection and evaluation, organizational dynamics (groups, power, teams, cooperation, competition, and communication), and human factors (reducing stress in the work environment). Course contains psychological theories, research, and practical applications (involving interviews and data analysis). Complements a Management major. Psy 100, Psy 200, and Math 210 or equivalent are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring

370. Behavior Disorders — A study of the major psychological/psychiatric disorders. Information regarding the diagnostic criteria, causes, treatment, attitudes toward people who have disorders will be explored. This course includes a research lab in which data will be collected, analyzed, and reported in a research paper using APA style. Psy 100 and Psy 200 are highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

382. Psychology of Gender — This course examines gender from a psychological perspective and is designed to provide students with a critical analysis of evidence for sex differences and similarities, the development of gender roles and identity, and the effect of gender on traditional issues in psychology. Using gender as a primary lens for inquiry, students examine a variety of topics, including family and close relationships, work and achievement, sexual orientation, personality and emotion, and power. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the personal and societal constructruction and consequences of gender and its intersections with social class, ethnicity, and sexuality. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD)

390. Advanced Research — A psychology laboratory course designed to provide students with hands-on experience with an actual, ongoing research program. Its main purpose is to prepare students for doctoral graduate study. Students will be assisting professors with their research and thus be learning by doing. Students must submit an application (available in the departmental office) no later than noon on the Friday before registration. Permission slips (required) will be distributed at 3:00 p.m. that same day. It is highly recommended that the course be taken no later than during the junior year. This course may be taken only once.
Prerequisites: Psy 200, Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

395. Studies in Psychology — An experimental lecture or seminar course designed as a one-time or trial offering. May be repeated for credit but no more than four credits may be applied to the 18-credit psychology minor. Psy 100 is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-4 Credits | As needed

410. Introduction to Clinical Psychology — This course will introduce the student to the major topics in clinical psychology. The most influential psychotherapies will be studied, including their theoretical background and applications. Research regarding therapeutic effectiveness will be discussed. In addition, the conceptual, statistical, and ethical issues involving assessment of personality and intelligence will be examined.
Prerequisites: Psy 200, Psy 370
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

435. Psychological Science and Religion — This seminar course will explore the ways that psychological scientists, neuroscientists, and theologians think about human nature and explain human behavior. The course will highlight points of difference between religious teachings and secular science, but also offer possibilities for collaboration between psychologists and theologians in the search for the truth about what it means to be human. Although the course will focus on Christianity, readings and examples from other religions will be included. Students who take this course will benefit from a strong background in psychology, and likely will also have a strong interest in and knowledge of the principles of Christian faith or another religious tradition. This course will provide an opportunity for students to explore the interface between those domains of knowledge and to make progress toward building a worldview that incorporates insights from both domains.
Prerequisites: Psy 100
4 Credits | Spring, Alternate Years

490. Special Studies — This program affords an opportunity for the advanced psychology student to pursue supervised projects of his or her own choosing beyond the regular course offerings. The project may take on one of two forms: the scholarly treatment of a particular topic using the library or laboratory research. Both types can be done in various combinations, on or off campus. To be eligible for the course the student must have a faculty sponsor, a specific topic in mind, a reasonable background in related course work, good independent study habits, initiative and high motivation. Special Studies credit requires departmental approval. The number of credits and whether the course is taken for a grade or on a pass-fail basis are subject to departmental approval. The course may be repeated but no more than four credits in this course may be applied to the psychology minor requirement of 20 credits. If the proposed research involves data collection, Psy 390 is highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Psy 200, Permission of instructor
0-4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

493. Honors Research — Honors Research is for students with the intellect, maturity, and drive to carry out an approved research project, typically in preparation for future graduate training or a research lab post after graduation. After a student has taken Supervised Studies and Advanced Research Lab, the student may work under faculty supervision to develop an independent research project. Prior to registering for PSY 493 for the upcoming term, the student and faculty person develop a working title and abstract that the faculty person shares with all department colleagues, inviting input from those who wish to contribute insights, concerns, and guidance. The shared abstract may draw on Human Subjects Review Board submission materials for the project. Psy 390 highly recommended prior to enrolling in this course.
Prerequisites: Psy 200
1-4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

495. Advanced Studies in Psychology — An experimental lecture or seminar course designed for a one-time or trial offering. Intended for students of demonstrated maturity, as usually indicated by Senior standing. May be repeated for credit, but no more than four credits may be applied to the 20-credit Psychology minor requirement.
Prerequisites: Psy 100, Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

496. Psychology Internship — A closely supervised practical experience in a professional setting for upperclass Psychology majors. The experience can include observing, assisting, assuming regular duties, or pursuing a special project. The general guideline for credit is 3 hours per week (for a semester) for each credit. This course may be repeated for credit but no more than four credits may be applied to the 20-credit psychology minor. Psy 100, Psy 200, Psy 230, and Psy 370 are highly recommended prior to this course.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-10 Credits | Fall, Spring, Summer

  • Bade, Dr. AmyHope CollegePsychology Department

    A. Paul Schaap Science Center 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7730

  • Brechting, Dr. EmilyHope CollegePsychology Department

    A. Paul Schaap Science Center 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7730

  • Bredow, Dr. CarrieHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1163 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7254

    More Information
  • Brownson, KathrynHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1153 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7179

    More Information
  • Cheadle, Dr. AlyssaHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1159 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7723

    More Information
  • Gall, Dr. AndrewHope CollegePsychology DepartmentNeuroscience

    Schaap Science Center 1157 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7729

    More Information
  • Green, Dr. ChuckHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1156 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3698

    Work616.395.7725

    More Information
  • Griffin, Dr. GeraldHope CollegePsychology DepartmentBiology DepartmentNeuroscience

    Schaap Science Center 2019A 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.6813

    More Information
  • Hernandez Jarvis, Dr. LornaHope CollegePsychology Department

    A. Paul Schaap Science Center 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7730

  • Hunsberger, KristenHope CollegePsychology Department

    A. Paul Schaap Science Center 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7730

  • Inman, Dr. MaryHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1164 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7148

    More Information
  • Mann, Dr. RebeccaHope CollegePsychology DepartmentEducation Department

    A. Paul Schaap Science Center 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7730

  • Meagher, BenjaminHope CollegePsychology Department

    A. Paul Schaap Science Center 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7730

  • Myers, Dr. DavidHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1154 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7728

    More Information
  • Poelker, KatelynHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1162 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7726

  • Roehling, Dr. PatriciaHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1166 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3698

    Work616.395.7732

    More Information
  • Root Luna, Dr. LindseyHope CollegePsychology DepartmentNeuroscience

    Schaap Science Center 1168 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7727

    More Information
  • Trent-Brown, Dr. SonjaHope CollegePsychology DepartmentPresident's Office

    Schaap Science Center 1160 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7264

  • Van Dyke, MarcyeHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1110 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423

    Work616.395.7730

  • Van Tongeren, Dr. DarylHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1169 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7432

    More Information
  • VanderStoep, Dr. ScottHope CollegeOffice of the Dean for Social SciencesPsychology DepartmentInternational Studies

    VanZoeren Hall-Room 291 41 Graves Place Holland, MI 49423-3698

    Work616.395.7903

    More Information
  • vanOyen-Witvliet, Dr. CharlotteHope CollegePsychology Department

    Schaap Science Center 1170 35 East 12th Street Holland, MI 49423-3605

    Work616.395.7167

    More Information