Sociology & Social Work

The Department of Sociology and Social Work provides students with a variety of courses in two major areas.

Majors

The social work major is a professional degree that is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Its principal objective is to prepare students for beginning level, generalist social work practice. (The Social Work Program is fully described following the sociology course list.)

Sociology can be defined as the scientific study of human societies. The sociology major prepares students who plan to enter graduate or professional school in the disciplines of sociology, law, urban planning, the ministry and numerous other professions as well as students intending to enter business.  Students majoring in sociology will be introduced to the major theoretical paradigms and methodological procedures of the discipline. They will also select several electives from a variety of topical courses. Finally, majors will participate in a senior-level capstone course that will focus on current issues of significance or in an off-campus internship in an approved program.

Social Work

The baccalaureate social work major is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Students will learn that social work is a profession dedicated to assisting people to attain life satisfaction through personal, social and environmental changes. Social work uses a variety of generalist practice methods, including direct interventions, community organization, and social welfare planning and policy development. Social work is concerned with meeting the needs of oppressed populations, including those most vulnerable and discriminated against.

Only graduates who are social work majors are eligible for licensing (LBSW) in Michigan and other states.

Social work majors alone are eligible to reduce the time in M.S.W. programs by up to two semesters through advanced standing programs. Please consult the social work faculty for more details.

In addition to their classroom experiences, social work students engage in a wide variety of activities working with various client populations in their internships:

  • Work with community organizations
  • Work with community agencies in program planning and implementation
  • Work with the elderly
  • Work with unemployed and underemployed
  • Work with people encountering difficult life transitions
  • Conduct social research in the community
  • Work with the developmentally and physically challenged
  • Work with juvenile delinquents
  • Work with at risk school children

The requirements for the social work major include the following social work courses:

  • SWK 241 – Introduction to Social Welfare
  • SWK 232 – Social Work and Family, Social Work 242 – Child Welfare or SWK 295 - Studies in Social Work
  • SWK 262 – Methods of Social Research
  • SWK 312 – Human Behavior and Social Environment
  • SWK 315 – Social Work with Diverse Populations
  • SWK 320 – Social Work Interviewing
  • SWK 322 – Contemporary Social Policy
  • SWK 351, 352 and401 – Social Work Interventions I, II and III
  • SWK 443 and 446 – Social Work Field Experience I and II

All social work majors must formally apply to the Social Work Program by February 15 of their freshman year or October 15 of their sophomore year. Admission is competitive and not guaranteed. To be eligible for admission –

  1. Applicants must have completed or be currently enrolled in PSY 100, SOC 101 and SWK 241.
  2. Applicants must have a minimum GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 2.7 in their social work courses.
  3. Applicants need two recommendations from Hope College faculty/staff.
  4. Applicants must submit a written personal statement which includes information about their commitment to social work as a vocation and describes their prior volunteer service in the field.

A student who does not fully meet one or more of the admission criteria may be admitted to the Social Work Program conditionally, provided the student, after an interview with the Program Director of Social Work, agrees in writing to remove the deficiency by the end of the following semester. Conditionally accepted students should be aware that there are risks involved in pursuing the first year of the social work major on a conditional basis. A minimum GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 2.7 in the social work major are required for graduation.

In addition, the following cognate courses are required:

  • PSY 100 – Introduction to Psychology
  • POL 100 – Introduction to American Political Institutions or POL 110 or POL 151
  • SOC 101 – Sociology and Social Problems
  • GEMS 158 - Human Biology or BIO 221 - Human Physiology
  • MATH 210 – Introductory Statistics or Math 311 - Statistical Methods

SWK 241 must be completed in the Spring Semester of the freshman year or the Fall Semester of the sophomore year. To ensure the fulfillment of all the social work degree requirements, students are urged to follow the schedule of courses indicated in the following four year curriculum:

Semester

Course

Credits

Freshman Year  - Fall                                                           Credits
ENG 113 Expository Writing I (EW) 4
IDS 100 First Year Seminar (FYS) 2
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology (S1A) 4
REL 100 Basic Studies in Religion (RL1) 2
Cultural Heritage I Requirement IDS 171/ENGL 231/HIST130 or PHIL 230 (CH1)

4

TOTAL   16
Freshman Year  - Spring                                                   CREDITS
SWK 241 Introduction to Social Welfare 2
Or    
Natural Science  GEMS, mathematics, or science course (MA) or (NS2) 2
KIN 140 Health Dynamics (HD) 2
POL 100 Intro to American Political Institutions and Lab (S1B) or  4
POL 110* Topics in Political Science (S2B) or  2
POL 151 Introduction to Global Politics (S1B) 4
SOC 101 Sociology and Social Problems (CD) 4
Language Requirement Language 1 - 101/121/171 4
  *If the 2-credit POL course is taken, 2 credits of electives will be needed.  
TOTAL   16
Sophomore Year  - Fall                                                   credits
MATH 210  Introductory Statistics (MA1) 4
Arts II requirement Studio or performance course(s) in art, creative writing, dance, music, theatre (FA2)  
Or    
Social  Work Elective SWK 232 Social Work and Family
SWK 242 Child Welfare or
SWK 295 Studies in Social Work
2
Cultural Heritage II requirement IDS 172/ENGL 232/HIST 131 or PHIL 232 (CH2) 4
Language requirement  Language II 102/122/172 (FL2) 4
Natural Science GEMS, mathematics, or science course (MA) or (NS2)  
Or    
SWK 241 Introduction to Social Welfare 2
TOTAL   16
Sophomore Year  - Spring                                               credits
SWK 351 Social Work Interventions I 4
Arts I Requirement ART 109 or 110/IDS 101/MUS 101 or 104 or 105/THEA 153 (FA1)  
Or    
SWK 320 Social Work Interviewing  4
GEMS 158 Human Biology in Health and Disease (NSL) or
BIOL 221, Human Physiology
4
REL 200+ 200-level course in biblical, historical, theological or world religions studies (RL2) 4
TOTAL   16
Junior Year - Fall                                                                     credits
SWK 312 Human Behavior in the Social Environment 6
SWK 320 Social Work Interviewing  
Or    
Arts I Requirement ART 109 or 110/IDS 101/MUS 101 or 104 or 105/THEA 153 (FA1) 4
SWK 352 Social Work Interventions II 4
Electives  2 credits in Electives 2
TOTAL   16 
Junior Year  - Spring                                                              credits
SWK 262 Methods of Social Research 4
SWK 315 Social Work with Diverse Populations 4
SWK 322 Contemporary Social Policy 4
SWK 401

Social Work Interventions III   
Or    
Electives 4 credits in Electives  4
TOTAL   16
Senior Year -  Fall                                                                     credits
SWK 401

Social Work Interventions III   
Or    
Electives 4 Credits in Electives 4
Or    
SWK 443 Field Practicum I 6
Arts II 
Requirement
Studio or performance course(s) in art, creative writing, dance, music, theatre (FA2) 2
Or    
Social Work Elective SWK 232 Social Work and Family
SWK 242 Child Welfare
SWK 295 Studies in Social Work
2
Electives 4 Credits in Electives 4
TOTAL   16
Senior Year  - Spring                                                            credits
SWK 446 Field Practicum II 6
Senior Seminar  IDS course numbered 400 or above (SRS) 4
Electives Electives 6
TOTAL   16

With prior permission, social work students may be allowed to carry out internships at The Philadelphia Center or the Chicago Semester.

No academic credit for life experience or previous work experience will be given in lieu of any social work or cognate courses required for social work major.

Graduates of Hope's Social Work Program have been involved in a variety of satisfying careers such as:

  • Social workers in a variety of practice settings
  • Graduate programs in social work
  • Ministers and church workers
  • Legal aid lawyers
  • Directors of drug clinics
  • Professional counselors
  • Supervisors in counseling centers
  • Urban planners
  • Teachers of social work
  • Community organizers
  • Director of social welfare programs

 

Sociology

The sociology major requires a minimum of 28 credits. This must include:

  • SOC 101 – Sociology and Social Problems
  • SOC 261 – Theoretical Perspectives in Sociology
  • SOC 262 – Methods of Social Research
  • At least two 4-credit 300-level courses
  • SOC 495 – Capstone Seminar in Sociology

In addition, students must demonstrate competence in statistics; this is usually accomplished by completing MATH 210 or 311.

Off-Campus Options

Many sociology majors take advantage of off-campus programs, both domestic and international. Students have been enrolled in both the Philadelphia Center and the Chicago Semester as well as in such international programs as those in England, Ireland, Scotland, Santiago, Dominican Republic and Queretaro, Mexico. The department strongly encourages students to avail themselves of these options, and we are ready to review the available course offerings to determine if they can count towards the sociology major or minor. In some instances, departmental credit will be granted for internship experiences in off-campus settings.

Permission for either the Criminal Justice emphasis or the Off-Campus option must be obtained from the chairperson of the Department of Sociology and Social Work.

Sociology majors are encouraged to take the following sequence of courses:

Year

COURSE

CREDITS

First Year
   
SOC 101 Sociology and Social Problems 4
IDS 100 First Year Seminar (FYS) 2
ENG 113 Expository Writing I (EW) 4
REL 100 Basic Studies in Religion (RL1) 2
KIN 140 Health Dynamics 2
GEMS General Education Mathematics 2
GEMs General Education Science 4
Foreign Language Requirement   8
Cultural Heritage Requirement  

4

TOTAL  

32

Second Year
   

SOC 261

Theoretical Perspectives (Fall) 4
SOC 262 Methods of Social Research (spring) 4
4 Credits of Sociology Elective

Students who intend to complete the Criminal Justice Emphasis must take SOC 221 and 222

4
MATH 210

Introductory Statistics (MA1) or

 
MATH 311

Statistical Methods

2-4
Social Science II requirement   2
Cultural History requirement   4
Performing Arts requirement    4
Other Electives   6
TOTAL   30-32
Third Year
   
2 Sociology Electives At 300-level 8
Upper Division Religion Requirement   4
Remaining Performing Art Requirement   2
4 General/Other Electives Students enrolled in the Criminal Justice emphasis should plan on spending the Spring semester of their junior year in Philadelphia; similarly, junior year is the preferred time for other off-campus programs. 16
TOTAL   32
Fourth Year
   
SOC 495 Capstone Course in Sociology (Spring) 4
1 Sociology Elective   4
IDS 495 Senior Seminar 4
4 General Electives   20
TOTAL
  32

 

Sociology with Criminal Justice Focus

Sociology majors may elect to graduate with a Criminal Justice (CJ) emphasis. This 32-credit program is intended for students preparing for careers in law enforcement, the criminal justice system and related occupations.

The CJ emphasis is offered in conjunction with The Philadelphia Center. Students must complete:

  • SOC 101, 261 and 262,
  • SOC 221 and 222 – Criminology I and II sequence
  • Four-credit sociology elective at the 300-level
  • Four-credit course entitled Social Justice (IDS 366 to be offered through The Philadelphia Center)
  • Related 8 credit internship in Philadelphia (IDS 351)

As with all majors, CJ students must demonstrate competence in Statistics.

Minors

Sociology

The Sociology minor consists of 20 credits of courses. Students will be required to complete SOC 101, 261 and 262. In addition, they will have to take another eight credits from among the department’s courses, four of which must be at the 300-level.

Sociology

101. Sociology and Social Problems — An examination of the concepts and theories which make up the sociological perspective, the evidence which tests these theories, and the ways in which the sociological perspective can aid in understanding social phenomena in the contemporary world. A lab is included in this class. This course fulfills the Social Science I, global learning domestic, and cultural diversity requirement of General Education.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD), Social Science 1 (SS1)

151. Cultural Anthropology — A study of the historical trends in anthropology that have led to its present perspectives. The concepts of functionalism and cultural relativism are examined and evaluated. The course surveys various cultural patterns around the world. This course fulfills the Social Science I, global learning international, and cultural diversity requirement of General Education.
4 Credits | Fall | Global Learning International (GLI), Social Science 1 (SS1)

221. Criminology I — Students will be introduced to the principal sociological perspectives on the causes of crime, with special emphasis on critically assessing and comparing key theoretical explanations of crime. This course is required for students planning to major in Sociology with a criminal justice emphasis and fulfills the Social Science II requirement.
2 Credits | Fall | Social Science 2 (SS2)

222. Criminology II — Students will be introduced to the Criminal Justice System with a focus on the principal sociological perspectives on the roles of law enforcement agencies, the judicial and penal systems, and post-conviction treatments. This course is required for students planning to major in sociology with a Criminal Justice emphasis. Students may take Soc 221 either prior to enrollment in or concurrently with the class.
Prerequisites: Soc 221
Corequisites: Soc 221
2 Credits | Fall

233. Sociology of the Family — This course examines several theoretical approaches to understanding the family as a social system, examines issues in the family, examines the social-class variations in the family and examines ethnically diverse families in the U.S.
4 Credits | Spring

261. Theoretical Perspectives in Sociology — This course will consider the principal historical and contemporary sociologists and their approaches to the study of society. Through their historical periods and their intellectual and personal biographies, students will be introduced to the major concepts and questions that sociologists consider.
Prerequisites: Soc 101, Declared Sociology major or minor
4 Credits | Fall

262. Methods of Social Research — A beginning course in the research designs, methods, and techniques used by social scientists. Students will become acquainted with probability theory, hypothesis testing, sampling, and elementary descriptive and inferential statistics. Computer-assisted projects and exercises using a variety of data sets will be introduced in laboratory sessions. Cross-listed with Swk 262.
Prerequisites: Soc 101, Declared Sociology major or minor, or declared Social Work major
4 Credits | Spring

269. Race and Ethnic Relations — The role that racial and ethnic diversity plays in society continues to be crucial. Much of contemporary social inequality, social conflict and efforts toward accommodation and assimilation have their roots in this diversity. In addition to describing and analyzing these themes, this course will offer an assessment of the American experience in light of broader global trends. This course fulfills the Social Science II and Domestic Global Learning general education requirements.
4 Credits | Fall | Global Learning Domestic (GLD), Social Science 2 (SS2)

271. Sociology of Gender I — In this course we will examine the different roles prescribed to individuals on the basis of sex. The particular focus will be the role of socialization and social institutions. We will consider the consequences of women's and men's assigned roles for their home and family life, work roles and achievements, media portrayals, and religious practices. This course fulfills the Social Science II and 2 credits of the cultural diversity requirements.
2 Credits | Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD), Social Science 2 (SS2)

272. Sociology of Gender II — In this half of the course we will examine the most popular gender theories and discuss their impact on men's and women's roles in the U.S. culture. We will focus more specifically on men's roles, the history and impact of the women's movement, and prospective gender roles in the future. This course includes an intergroup dialogue experience.
Prerequisites: Soc 271
2 Credits | Spring | Global Learning Domestic (GLD), Social Science 2 (SS2)

280. Social Psychology — The specific study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Topics include the self, conformity, persuasion, prejudice, and interpersonal attraction. Data collection and analysis are part of the laboratory experience. Psy 100 and Psy 200 are highly recommended prior to this course. Cross-listed as Psy 280.
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

281. Sociology of Popular Culture — Human beings are immersed in culture; it touches all aspects of our lives. We create, alter, and are influenced by culture; in fact it is one of the most powerful socialization agents we encounter. In this course we will explore the meanings and impacts of culture. We will discuss how our current culture shapes us, and how we shape current culture. We will begin to view popular culture through what C. Wright Mills called the Sociological Imagination. We will give extensive attention to issues of gender, race, and class and its impacts on popular culture. By the time you finish this course you will be equipped with a new perspective on how to interpret the culture in which you live.
4 Credits | Fall

295. Studies in Sociology — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
2-4 Credits | As Needed

312. Urban Sociology — An exploration into the social forces that create and shape cities. Students will be introduced to the perspectives that sociologists use to study cities and the factors contributing to urbanization. The course will investigate the origins and development of cities, with an emphasis on the temporal and spatial dimensions of urban development. Urban problems will be addressed in comparative and historical perspectives.
4 Credits | Fall

314. Power and Society — Political sociology is centrally concerned with political relations, policies, and practices as well as larger questions of conflict, cooperation, power, influence and authority. Its basic task is to explore the myriad of ways that different groups compete for resources and influence. This course examines the relationship between society and politics, the interactions between individuals and governments. With an awareness of agency and structure, processes of nationalism, globalization and civil society are investigated. We will consider ideology and attempt to understand political identity. We will examine power, social movements, and cultural politics. This course primarily will focus on the relationships between the U.S. and democracy both at home and abroad. Through our sociological study of politics students will gain a better understanding of the interactions amongst class, race, and gender, dictatorship and democracy, culture and mass communication, production, consumption, distribution, centralization and decentralization, competition and coalitions, power and resistance, rights and responsibilities in addition to cultural, philosophical and social concerns. This course will also examine the processes of globalization and polarization and connect these processes to meanings of citizenship and civil society.
2 Credits | Spring | Social Science 2 (SS2)

316. Sociology of Law — This course will provide a unique perspective on the law - how it works, how it is made and meted out, and how it impacts on and is impacted by the larger culture. We will examine law as a social process, law in action - recognizing that "law" does not take place in a social vacuum. This course examines the relationship between law and society, focusing particular attention on: the larger social and political context in which laws are created and implemented and the consequences of law for individuals and institutions in society. Students will be introduced to, and then apply, the scholarly theories and research of law and society, including contemporary American legal issues. We will explore the practice of law in American society by examining the nature of legal reasoning and the purpose and function of various parts of the legal process and legal institutions.
2 Credits | Spring | Social Science 2 (SS2)

333. Medical Sociology — An introduction to the sociological study of health, illness, and medicine more generally. The impact of gender, race and social class on health outcomes will be emphasized. Attention will also be directed to health care delivery systems, health professional education and socialization, and patient perspectives and experiences.
4 Credits | Spring

341. Sociology of Religion — The study of religion has been central to sociology from its earliest days. This course will introduce students to the major theoretical approaches which are being used to study religion. A focus will be on sociological explanations of religious beliefs, affiliation and practices. We explore topics such as religious organizations, gender differences in religiosity, generational shifts, secularzation, and how religion patters stratification.
4 Credits | Spring, Even Years | Social Science 2 (SS2)

356. Social Movements — This course is about social movements – collective action in which groups use institutionalized and non-institutionalized tactics to promote or resist social and political change. Students will study the history and impact of the Civil Rights Movement as a template for other historic and contemporary examples of social change. Students will also serve in a local community organizing placement in order to see the application of course material on community development. These placements will be made by the second week of class by the instructor.
4 Credits | Spring, Even Years | Global Learning Domestic (GLD)

365. Sociology of Education and Childhood — This course examines the nexus between children, the education system and the rest of society through a sociological lens. This demands that we consider not just the socialization process but also the structural aspects that impact children and all levels of education. The course surveys principle ways of thinking about schools as organizations and about the consequences of these structures for the distribution for life chances. The focus is on theory and research concerned with the organizational and occupational sides of schools, teaching and children. This course will take a sociological perspective and explore the diversity of children’s experiences with socialization and schools across family structure, race and ethnicity, social class and gender. Key topics include trends in gender, racial and class inequalities in schooling, the content of schooling, current reform politics, issues of school funding, and global differences in education.
4 Credits | Fall

390. Advanced Research Project — A research oriented course designed to get advanced students actively involved in an ongoing research project. The course is primarily intended for students contemplating graduate studies in sociology. Students will be assisting professors with a research project and thus be learning by doing. This course may be taken only once.
Prerequisites: Soc 262, Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Fall

395. Studies in Sociology — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

490. Independent Studies in Sociology — This program affords an opportunity for advanced students in sociology to pursue a project of their own interest beyond the regular course offerings. The project may take one of several forms: 1) library readings on a topic in sociology, 2) a supervised research project, 3) a supervised field project combining study with appropriate work experience.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
2-4 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Capstone Seminar in Sociology — A senior course designed to enable students and faculty to organize and integrate a variety of interest areas in sociology, thereby culminating the major with a synthesis provided through theoretical perspectives. A minimum of 16 credits in Soc courses is highly recommended prior to this course.
4 Credits | Spring

499. Sociology Internship — A supervised practical experience in a governmental, private, and/or non-profit organization. The general guideline for credit is 3 hours per week for each credit hour awarded. This course may be repeated for credit but no more than 6 hours may be applied to fulfilling the sociology major.
Prerequisites: Senior status, Declared Sociology major, Permission of department
1-6 Credits | Fall, Spring

Social Work-CSWE

232. Social Work and Family — This course examines the family from a developmental approach. Research studies will focus on the trends in family life and social problems related to family functioning at each stage of a family's development.
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

241. Introduction to Social Welfare — This course examines the role of social workers in society. Social work fields of practice are explored including medical social work, school social work, poverty-based social work, juvenile corrections, gerontology, etc. This course is intended to be an introductory course for students exploring the possibility of social work as a career. Students may take Soc 101 either prior to enrollment in or concurrently with the class.
Prerequisites: Soc 101
Corequisites: Soc 101
2 Credits | Fall, Spring

242. Child Welfare — This course examines the philosophy of child welfare as a specific part of social welfare and the programs that constitute the child welfare institutions. Child abuse and neglect is a major topic of this course.
2 Credits | Fall

262. Methods of Social Research — A beginning course in the research designs, methods, and techniques used by social scientists. Students will become acquainted with probability theory, hypothesis testing, sampling, and elementary descriptive and inferential statistics. Computer-assisted projects and exercises using a variety of data sets will be introduced in laboratory sessions. Cross-listed as Soc 262.
Prerequisites: Soc 101, Declared Sociology major or minor, or declared Social Work major
4 Credits | Spring

295. Studies in Social Work — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
1-4 Credits | As Needed

312. Human Behavior & Social Envirn — This course will focus on the interaction between persons and the social systems they encounter throughout maturation. Special attention will be given to the interactions and systems as they relate to and affect social work practice with a variety of populations, including those experiencing ethnic, racial, sexual, and age-based discrimination.
Prerequisites: Declared Social Work major
6 Credits | Fall

315. Social Work with Diverse Populations — This course will prepare students for ethnically sensitive social work practice. Students will examine assumptions, strategies, and procedures that will enhance their values, knowledge and skills to more effectively interact with diverse populations at each stage of the social intervention process.
Prerequisites: Declared Social Work major
4 Credits | Spring

320. Social Work Interviewing — This course will focus on the principles of the social work interview; the examination of techniques and theoretical models that increase the effectiveness of social work interventions; and the demonstration and practice of these skills.
Prerequisites: Swk 241, Declared Social Work major
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

322. Social Policy — This course examines the history and philosophy of the profession of social work. It also examines social policy issues such as poverty and mental illness and the significance of social, economic, and political factors in policy making implementation.
Prerequisites: Swk 241, Pol 100 or 110, Declared Social Work major
4 Credits | Spring

351. Social Interventions I — This course is the first in a series of practice courses in the social work major curriculum. It will focus on the generalist interventions process of working with client systems: engagement, assessment, goal setting, intervention planning, contracting, intervention applications, evaluation, and termination. Attention will be given to social work values; ethical decision making; roles of the social worker; and ethnic, racial and gender sensitive practice.
Prerequisites: Swk 241, Declared Social Work major
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

352. Social Interventions II — This course is the second in a series of practice courses in the social work curriculum. It will focus on the generalist practice skills, interventions and issues involved in working with client systems consisting of families and small groups. Planning, assessment, intervention and termination stages will be addressed. Attention will be given to social work values; ethical decision making; roles of the social worker; and ethnic, racial and gender sensitive practice.
Prerequisites: Swk 351
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

395. Studies in Social Work — A course offered in response to student and instructor interest. Topics are not generally covered in the regular course listings. Course may be taken multiple times if topics are different.
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
1-4 Credits | As Needed

401. Social Interventions III — This course is the third in a series of social work practice courses. It will examine the types of human service organizations within the community and examine the political and social context in which community organizing takes place in contemporary society. As an interventions course, it will continue to focus on the stages and processes utilized in generalist social work practice through a problem solving approach.
Prerequisites: Swk 352
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

443. Social Work Field Experience I — This program offers the opportunity for advanced social work students to work with individuals, groups, and community organizations under the close supervision of professional social workers. The program is offered in cooperation with several social and criminal justice agencies in Western Michigan. Work may include direct service, client advocacy, training, referral service, and community organizing for client systems. Students will spend 220 hours per semester in the field. The weekly practicum seminar is also a component of this course. Students may take Swk 401 either prior to enrollment in or concurrently with the class.
Prerequisites: Swk 401
Corequisites: Swk 401
6 Credits | Fall

446. Social Work Field Experience II — This course is a continuation of Swk 443.
6 Credits | Fall, Spring

490. Independent Study — This program allows advanced students in social work to pursue a project of their own interest beyond regular course offerings. Project may take the form of library research and study project or supervised research project. Students must have a specific project in mind. A minimum of 20 credits in Swk courses is highly recommended prior to this course.
2-3 Credits | Fall, Spring

495. Advanced Seminar in Social Work — A senior level seminar course designed for trial course offerings which enable faculty and students to organize and integrate a variety of interest areas in social work.
Prerequisites: Senior standing, Declared Social Work major, Permission of instructor
4 Credits | Fall, Spring

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